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Principles of Concurrent and Distributed Programming (2nd Edition) Paperback – March 6, 2006

ISBN-13: 978-0321312839 ISBN-10: 032131283X Edition: 2nd

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley; 2 edition (March 6, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 032131283X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0321312839
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.7 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,041,183 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

Final Cover Copy – Ben-Ari

 

Principles of Concurrent and

Distributed Programming

2nd Edition

 

M. Ben-Ari

 

The latest edition of a classic text from a winner of the ACM/SIGCSE

Award for Outstanding Contribution to Computer Science Education.

         

Software today is inherently concurrent or distributed – from event-based GUI designs to operating and real-time systems to Internet applications. The new edition of this classic introduction to concurrency has been completely revised in view of the growing importance of concurrency

constructs embedded in programming languages and of formal methods

such as model checking that are widely used in industry.

 

The 2nd edition:

 

Ø     Focuses on algorithmic principles rather than language syntax;

Ø     Emphasizes the use of the Spin model checker for modeling concurrent systems and verifying program correctness;

Ø     Explains the implementation of concurrency in the Java and Ada languages.

Ø     Facilitates lab work with software tools for learning concurrent and distributed programming.

 

Check out the companion website for the book at www.pearson.co.uk/ben-ari  to find additional resources for both students and instructors, including source code in various languages for the programs in the book, answers to the exercises, and slides for all diagrams, algorithms and programs.

 

About the Author

 

Mordechai (Moti) Ben-Ari is an Associate Professor in the Department of Science Teaching at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel.  He is the author of texts on Ada, concurrent programming, programming languages, and mathematical logic, as well as Just a Theory: Exploring the Nature of Science.  In 2004 he was honored with the ACM/SIGCSE Award for Outstanding Contribution to Computer Science Education.

 

About the Author

Mordechai (Moti) Ben-Ari is an Associate Professor in the Department of Science Teaching at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel.  He is the author of texts on Ada, concurrent programming, programming languages, and mathematical logic, as well as Just a Theory: Exploring the Nature of Science.  In 2004 he was honored with the ACM/SIGCSE Award for Outstanding Contribution to Computer Science Education.


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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By WILSON YEUNG on October 9, 2002
Format: Paperback
An excellent, rigorous, mathematical introduction to concurrent programming. This book concentrates on principles and theory, providing an excellent background for concurrent programming.

Readers expecting a tutorial on pthreads or win32 threads should look elsewhere.

A calculus for reasoning about concurrent programming is presented, along with problems, solutions, and proofs for common concurrent programming concerns.

A superb academic treatment of the topic, but not for the weak kneed.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Jacob on October 15, 2011
Format: Paperback
Overall I think this book is good, but contains a ton of unnecessary imperfections
that could have easily have been avoided. If you are able to ignore those parts
and not let them ruin your mood, I think you will enjoy this book and learn efficiently from it.
I want to add that my grade is closer to 2 stars than to 4 stars. With some improvements,
I think the book could easily deserve 4 or even 5 stars.

MERITS:
It has a nice mathematical/rigorous view of the subject and emphasizes the
important things, which are the principles and concepts of concurrent programing.
I am greatly in favor of this philosophy, because the first thing you want to do
when learning a new subject is to get the panoramic view of what are the problems
and techniques of the field, and how do all the concepts relate to each other.

There is also merit in isolating what is actually unique about concurrent programming,
and avoid bloated 1000-page works that are filled with things you already know
about other subjects, e.g. general programming techniques. Also focusing on pseudocode
instead of cluttering the algorithms with syntax of particular languages is a benefit.

Ben-Ari succeeds in writing a pretty friendly page-turner which will have you understand
what concurrent programming is about, and most of the central constructs, in a matter of a couple of weeks.

DEMERITS:
At the level of details, the book is, unfortunately, not well thought out. There are tons
of sentences that are vague, unnecessarily complicated or ambiguous. In most of these
spots it is possible to rule out all incorrect interpretations, or to fill in the gaps,
given enough time.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 26, 1999
Format: Paperback
A very good introductory text to concurrent programming, using something like pseudo-ada as the example language. It starts introducing the basics concepts, like deadlocks, starvation, contention, etc. There's a entire chapter for Semaphores and Another one for Monitors. So, it explores the folclorical problem of the Dinning Philosophers. Real paralell programming is discused too. There's special chapters for the Languages Linda, Ocan and Ada. It ends with a review of the Spartian Generals problem and a chapter about real time sistems
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Kenneth Fox on May 17, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is a poor choice for an introductory concurrency textbook. The concepts of concurrency and the mechanisms used to implement it are not that diffcult to understand, however, the author's overly terse and poorly presented core material renders an otherwise simple subject incomprehensible. Some chapter introductions read reasonably well; however the author routinely dismisses the completion of various proofs as trivial, rendering self-study virtually impossible if something is not clear. If the book is used in a course with a poor instructor, you'll waste a lot of time trying to learn from the book, and will need to find additional resources.

A primary drawback is the author's heavy reliance on mathematical proofs (admittedly a core part of proving concurrence works) is unsupported by an adequate quantity fully completed non-trivial proofs properly organized and documented to be suitable for teaching the process and logic the author used to reach a given conclusion. As with many mathematical texts, the author assumes that the audience, understands all of the steps he has skipped to get from A to B. The style is suitable for technical papers but not texts intended to teach the more abstract subject matter.

A second issue is the author's contrivance of a psuedo-code shorthand that is used throughout the book. While the psuedo code is reminiscent of many mathematical notations as well as the the pseudo code notation used in Knuth's 'The Art of Computer Programming', the teaching aspects would be better served by providing inline comments, and other cues that are generally expected in mordern software. Knuth's explanations are a benchmark in educational texts.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 28, 1998
Format: Paperback
Used this text at Stanford 5 years ago and was very happy with it. Now recommending to others. Oldie, but goodie.
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