Engineering & Transportation
Principles of Optics and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$91.42
Qty:1
  • List Price: $99.00
  • Save: $7.58 (8%)
Only 10 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Principles of Optics: Ele... has been added to your Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $29.22
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Principles of Optics: Electromagnetic Theory of Propagation, Interference and Diffraction of Light Hardcover – October 13, 1999

ISBN-13: 978-0521642224 ISBN-10: 0521642221 Edition: 7th

Buy New
Price: $91.42
35 New from $77.67 20 Used from $51.60
Amazon Price New from Used from
eTextbook
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$91.42
$77.67 $51.60
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student

$91.42 FREE Shipping. Only 10 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Principles of Optics: Electromagnetic Theory of Propagation, Interference and Diffraction of Light + Introduction to Fourier Optics + Optics (4th Edition)
Price for all three: $329.26

Buy the selected items together
  • Introduction to Fourier Optics $90.39
  • Optics (4th Edition) $147.45

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

China
Engineering & Transportation Books
Discover books for all types of engineers, auto enthusiasts, and much more. Learn more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 985 pages
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 7th edition (October 13, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0521642221
  • ISBN-13: 978-0521642224
  • Product Dimensions: 9.8 x 7.1 x 1.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.9 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #87,849 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Principles of Optics is a great, rigorous, ponderous, unwavering mathematical tract that deals with a welath of topics...a great book, the seventh edition is a fine one, and as I said, if you work in the field you probably should own it." Physics Today

"Principles of Optics is a great book, the seventh edition is a fine one, and if you work in the field you probably ought to own it." Physics Today

Book Description

Principles of Optics is one of the classic science books of the twentieth century, and probably the most influential book in optics published in the past 40 years. The new edition is the first ever thoroughly revised and updated edition of this standard text and contains much new material. This standard work has been on the market for nearly 40 years and reprinted 16 times. The new edition will continue to be invaluable to advanced undergraduates, graduate students and researchers working in most areas of optics.

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
14
4 star
6
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 20 customer reviews
I specifically like the chapters devoted to geometrical optics and the rigorous treatment of diffraction.
Wilhelm
A typical undergraduate text that I recommend is Optics by Eugene Hecht who also wrote the Schaum's Outline for Optics.
stanley b. kocsis
Also the shapes of the characters in the equations looks much more pretty so it helps reading, understanding.
Jinwon Sung

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

59 of 64 people found the following review helpful By GPK on December 31, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Already for many years, this is a classic on optics. Almost any subject you can think of is covered in this book, in a fundamental way. That is its strength and its weakness: experienced scientists will find everything they need, but for students it is not a good book because it is far too detailed: they will get lost in all the mathematical details before they grasp the essence of the subject.

This problem also exists - to a lesser extent - for professionals who try to use the book to fill in a gap in their knowledge: they too will find themselves asking why they have to read so many (well thought-through) pages before the authors finally make their point.

My advice: use other books to study from, and use this book when you are already experienced and need a high-quality reference work.

A note for scienctists: please mention section numbers when referring to this book in your own publications.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
33 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Yvan Dutil on December 12, 2002
Format: Hardcover
This book is a classic with all problems associated. Half of the reference quoted have been written before the WWII. Very useful if you like to quote original papers. This book cover most topics of the classical optics but hardy cover modern topics.
However, it is hard to read and use a weird notation. Certainly not useful for rapid referencing. Like the bible, use it only when you have serious problem to deal with.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
26 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Jinwon Sung on September 21, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This seventh edition of the famous classic standard book on optics is really neat! The notations, symbols became a little more modern than the previous editions. Also the shapes of the characters in the equations looks much more pretty so it helps reading, understanding. As most of you know, this has everything you need to study about, refer to classical wave optics. The only weak point of this book is the material covering geometrical optics. It's too abstract, mathematical and lacks modern treatment of optical designs, aberrations. But, regarding the wave optics, it's hard to find any flaws, downsides. Even though I am working on micro-photonic elements, I often need to refer to this book for some wave optics principles, knowledges. But this book alone does not cover the whole optics including optical design, photonics. If you want to have the best minimum combination of books covering the basics of the entire optics. I would recommend "Fundamentals of Photonics(Saleh)", "Modern Optical Engineering(Smith)" and this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By "bomohwkl" on March 13, 2003
Format: Hardcover
It is just a rare book on physical optics based on Maxwell equations. Rarely a book states the assumptions,the validity of the equations, the principles and how the equations arrived. Certainly, it is a great book for postgraduates and researchers in physical optics not so for undergraduate students who don't want to go through all the mathematics.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Reliability Guru on April 1, 2000
Format: Hardcover
It should be on the shelf of every serious optical engineer or scientist. I find myself referring to it at least monthly. What more needs to be said?
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Patrick Van Esch on August 8, 2002
Format: Hardcover
It is of course the reference for optics, and is very complete
and rigorous. I didn't learn optics from it, I only use it
as a reference and I suppose that is its function.
It feels a bit oldfashioned (for example, I haven't found
speckel applications in the chapter on coherence) but I
suppose that that is due to the fact that it is a classic.
My other, personal, objection is that I hate Gaussian
units, I prefer by far SI units. Even Jackson finally
conceded to switch to SI units, but Wolf clings on this
Gaussian system.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Ulfilas on March 1, 2013
Format: Hardcover
In reading Max's Born's My Life and My Views I learned that he reworked his lectures on optics into his original 1933 textbook while recovering from a nervous breakdown brought on by heavy demands of his groundbreaking research on quantum mechanics at Gottingen. This volume is the latest version of his inspired tome. Originally, I picked up Born and Wolf in order to understand the origin of the third order spherical aberration coefficient--a derivation that I found completely satisfying. Many important issues are addressed by Born, including Kirchoff's integral and diffraction theory, including Fresnel and Fraunhoffer diffraction. Both thin and thick lenses are also treated.

At Gottingen Born benefited from what he characterized as excellent lectures on optics by Woldemar Voigt, as well as Voigt's advanced course on optical experiments. Born later returned to Gottingen as Voigt's assistant. It should also be noted that Born had concentrated on astronomy at different points in his studies and career, which may have also contributed to these lectures. It is worth noting that his treatment of lens aberrations (pp.207-211) was taken from that of Karl Schwarzshild (of the Schwartzschild Radius for black holes) who was Born's astronomy professor at Gottingen--a method which Born describes as "similar to that used in calculations in celestial mechanics." Born was also a guest at Albert Michelson's laboratory at University of Chicago in 1922, where he performed spectroscoptic experiments using Michelson's state-of-the-art diffraction gratings. Perhaps that visit contributed to the section in this book on stellar inferometers.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By stanley b. kocsis on September 11, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a great book that I have used often. This is a graduate text. You should have had an undergraduate course in optics first. A typical undergraduate text that I recommend is Optics by Eugene Hecht who also wrote the Schaum's Outline for Optics. This being a graduate text you should have taken math for each of the four years of your undergraduate studies. My graduate work is in Microelectronics & Photonics and I use the book now as reference book. This book covers the theory very well; I have not found any other book that even comes close.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?