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31 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent and Important
In his 2005 article "Correctional HMOs and the Coming Prison Plague," author Will S. Hylton writes, "It occurs to me now that prisons are designed for keeping secrets, for holding inside not just men [and women] but also their lives and the details of those lives."

In Prison Profiteers, Tara Herivel and Paul Wright chronicle hundreds of instances where prisons...
Published on February 28, 2008 by sabonis

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars but predictably not much fun to read
This is one of those books that everyone should read, but predictably not much fun to read. Mercifully, it is easy to read. In other words, one can read it quickly.
Published 3 months ago by albriaun


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31 of 31 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent and Important, February 28, 2008
By 
sabonis (Brooklyn, NY) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Prison Profiteers: Who Makes Money from Mass Incarceration (Hardcover)
In his 2005 article "Correctional HMOs and the Coming Prison Plague," author Will S. Hylton writes, "It occurs to me now that prisons are designed for keeping secrets, for holding inside not just men [and women] but also their lives and the details of those lives."

In Prison Profiteers, Tara Herivel and Paul Wright chronicle hundreds of instances where prisons not only kept their secrets close, but let corrupt politicians and huge corporations make off with millions by doing so. The authors compile essays and articles dealing with the private prison industry from every angle -- mapping prison costs in low-income urban neighborhoods, the effect of prison construction on small-town America, the mega-corporations that run what passes for health care inside prisons and the politicians that shape laws to help themselves and their rich friends, with little care about those people who actually pass through the system. The bottom line in every article seems to be the bottom line. Much more energy is spent by public officials flossing the image of being "tough on crime" for public support so they can cut deals that will supposedly lessen budget deficits or fill their pockets than create actual rehabilitation services or safety within prisons.

One of the most powerful advocacy pieces is Jennifer Gonnerman's article, "Million Dollar Blocks: Neighborhood Costs of America's Prison Boom." It looks at how much money is spent keeping prisoners behind bars, per person, added up per city block. The total is often over one million dollars for one block, mainly in some of the poorest neighborhoods in the country, where people -- usually people of color -- have little access to education and good jobs, and there is no other financial investment in their communities except keeping them in prison. By mapping these areas within cities, activists hope to show legislators that the money would be better invested in education, job placement programs and other opportunities for residents.

Some of the most riveting essays were those that read less "academic" and were more personal accounts of investigative journalism, such as Hylton's piece on Correctional Medical Services, where he interviewed various personalities involved with the secrecy of prison health care. He opens the article with a visit to a prisoner with grotesque disfigurements due to health officials' lack of / botched care for his hepatitis, who dies only a week after his visit, reportedly from "unknown causes." He examines the numbers of inmates who have hepatitis -- which is highly contagious throughout a person's life -- and asks what is going to happen as they are continually un-treated and then leave prison with the disease. A pattern emerges as he talks to local prison activists, ex-nurses and an evasive public relations rep -- there is no real accountability for CMS's actions, beyond an occasional successful lawsuit. A nurse even admits as much: "We have no accountability. If I deny care, that's it. You have no recourse."

Herivel and Wright have put together an excellent compendium covering the numerous ways profit is made on the backs of prisoners. This is a highly recommended read, for not just prison activists but all concerned about the state of the "justice" in this country, the convoluted priorities of many public officials and what a number of local activists, academics and journalists are trying to do to combat these corporations.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must read for anyone interested in preserving human rights and defeating slavery, October 28, 2011
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This book is a compilation of articles written by no less than 15 respected authors. Chock full of statistics, the well sourced articles cover a range of topics related to the mass incarceration industry. This is a must read for anyone who wants to understand what is driving the unprecedented growth of the American prison system.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Prison Profiteers is a well written and concise book, March 16, 2008
This review is from: Prison Profiteers: Who Makes Money from Mass Incarceration (Hardcover)
Prison Profiteers is a well written and concise book that outlines and details the spiraling costs of incarceration today. The costs are many and more then they seem as future generations will be impacted by what is going on now with the Draconian sentences and policies being adhered too. Prisons run for profit, this is American right? A very good book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A necessary part of criminal justice reform, August 24, 2011
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This work explains the increases in cost and worisome trends in our prison system. Backdoor prison financing, the political expedience but practcal fantasy of shifting prison costs onto prisoners, the private prison industry, the prison health care industry, the prison manufacturing industry, and the prison telephone industry, to name a few.

This is a good read for anyone with loved ones serving time in our prison system, and for anyone with political leanings in county, amd state government.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Speaking truth to power, November 24, 2013
By 
Frank Smith (Bluff City, KS USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Prison Profiteers: Who Makes Money from Mass Incarceration (Hardcover)
. America needs to be regularly shaken by works like this, a basic necessity if it is ever to awaken and survive.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, July 3, 2014
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This was a gift and well received.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, September 3, 2014
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This review is from: Prison Profiteers: Who Makes Money from Mass Incarceration (Hardcover)
a must read to undeerstand how america is being enslaved by ruthless corrupt officials
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Turning people into commodities, September 7, 2011
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Though its hitting the headlines more and more many American's are not even aware that there is a growing trend of privation of prisons in our country and what it means. But it is one of several reasons that the U.S. holds the world record for having the most people behind bars... even more than China! When prisons are privately owed money is made by having more and more people behind bars. And these corporations who hold the purse strings are lobbying congress to make sure that happens. Complete with a lot of factual documentation info.

Nancy Rector, author of:
"A Painful Truth - The Entrapment of America's Sick" (How being ill got me arrested.)
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars but predictably not much fun to read, August 17, 2014
By 
albriaun (Keeler, CA USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Prison Profiteers: Who Makes Money from Mass Incarceration (Hardcover)
This is one of those books that everyone should read, but predictably not much fun to read. Mercifully, it is easy to read. In other words, one can read it quickly.
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4 of 14 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars dry as toast, October 7, 2009
By 
J. Collier (San Antonio, TX USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Prison Profiteers: Who Makes Money from Mass Incarceration (Hardcover)
I received this product by ultrafast shipping in excellent condition & it was exactly as described so I have no complaint about the transaction. The book however is extremely dry, comparable to a documentary on television. There are a lot of facts & figures which tend to run together after a while. I guess I expected more real life stories and not so many statistics.
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Prison Profiteers: Who Makes Money from Mass Incarceration
Prison Profiteers: Who Makes Money from Mass Incarceration by Wil S. Hylton (Hardcover - January 1, 2008)
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