Prisoner of Conscience (Jurisdiction Series Book 2) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Prisoner of Conscience Mass Market Paperback – February, 1998


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Library Binding
"Please retry"
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$4.29 $0.01

Dead Shift by Richard Phillips
Dead Shift by Richard Phillips
Enjoy the final chapter of the Rho Agenda Inception series. Learn more | See related books

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

After earning an undergraduate degree in psychology, Susan R. Matthews was commisioned into the United States Army, where she was the operations and security officer for a combat support hospital specializing in nuclear, biological, and radiological warfare. Currently working as an auditor for an aerospace manufacturer, Susan lives with her partner in Seattle, Washington.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Avon Books; 1st Printing edition (February 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0380789140
  • ISBN-13: 978-0380789146
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 4.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,105,764 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Susan was born into a military family. Her mother moved her entire family all over the world as her father's assignments took them from coast to coast in the United States, to Germany, and to India; she spent half of the first fourteen years of her life with no access to radio or television in the English language. As a result the family, thrown on its own resources, read ravenously and passed books around from sib to sib as they came in. Her first exposure to science fiction came with her oldest brother's subscription to science fiction book clubs, which brought "I, Robot," "The Voyage of the Space Beagle," and "The World of Null-A" into the house years before "Stranger in a Strange Land" or even "Fahrenheit 451."

In a resource-constrained environment the obvious response to a desire to read a particular story was to write it oneself, because there was no other way to get to read it. That's where she started, and where she still is, writing stories that she wants to read so that she'll get to read them when she's done. (This might give rise to speculation given the subject matter of the Jurisdiction series, but her mother said that "a writer can write about anything she pleases, because a writer's world is the world of the mind." If that helps any.) The fact that other people enjoy reading them too remains a slightly confusing wonderment, but she's very grateful that people do.

Susan and her wife Maggie were recently legally married in the state of Washington after thirty-three years of living in sin. She has two dogs, three brothers, two sisters, manyseveral nieces and nephews; a "general" ham radio license; and lives in Seattle.

Scott versus Amundsen: Amundsen
Peary versus Cook: Cook
Seahawks versus the world: Seahawks
More versus RIII: RIII
Paper versus plastic: whatever's handy will do fine

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 7, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I don't usually like books that romanticize evil. I tolerate them only when they are extremely well written. This one is.
Matthews presents a disturbing universe and asks us to care about a character who engages in sadistic acts. For the most part, we do care about him. He is psychologically interesting and, evil as are his actions, he is so much better than most of the other evil people around him. At least he has standards and limits.
Among the most fascinating aspects of this series are the reactions of other people to the main character. Victims who forgive and even love their victimizers are nothing new. But Matthews helps us see the psychology behind it.
I look forward to other novels in this series.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Reader on November 7, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I think that previous reviewers have put their senses of outrage on overdrive: let's remember that Miss Matthews' world is a FANTASY one - there is no Judiciary - and where do the Germans come in to it??? "Prisoner of Conscience" is actually a very interesting insight into the nature of wickedness (the old "two sides to every person" story), and wouldn't work at all if the writer were not sympathetic to her man. It's a bit grisly in parts but basically a fab read. Susan R Matthews is a really refreshing new(ish) talent on the sci-fi scene - and, my goodness, wasn't it about time for one?
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By sriddle@pobox.com on February 7, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Aside from a few minor quibbles with language and a slightly bumpy beginning, Prisoner of Conscience is superb. The characters we met and came to love and fear in An Exchange of Hostages grow and become more real. The dark study of An Exchange of Hostages is continued.
In the Amazon.com interview with Susan R. Matthews the author says that one of her favorite writers/ writing models was Joseph Conrad. While the prose styling (thankfully) does not betray this model, the thematic development and structure do. In this book I felt once again as I felt when I read Heart of Darkness--a gathering of horror and of revelation, and a profound reflection of society's truisms and foibles.
If An Exchange of Hostages held up a mirror to each person, Prisoner of Conscience holds up a mirror to society and asks the same hard questions.
This book is serious science fiction by a writer who is obviously skilled in her art and gifted at handling serious thematic material. From the first sentence you are drawn into the narrative and into the gradually unfolding horror of genocide, hatred, and in some very real ways the interior workings of corporate America.
Throughout the work I was reminded of Hannah Arendt's observation of Adolf Eichmann--"The Banality of Evil."
This book and its predecessor are two of the must-read science fiction books not just of the year but, perhaps, of the decade.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By SH in Tampa on March 19, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
What would you do if you had the power of life and death over people every day? What if you felt guilty because you loved having that power?
This is the dilemma that faces the protagonist in Susan Matthew's "Prisoner of Conscience". Set in a universe where independent planets face conquest and suppression by a theocratic government and punitive slavery is enforced by biomechanical devices, Ms. Matthews relies on interesting moral conflicts and well written characters rather than complex scientific gadgetry to tell her story.
Given the strong psychological suspense and not so subtle sexual undertones, this book seems more like a BDSM novel than straight science fiction. Either way, this book makes an engrossing read and I would recommend it quite strongly.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By H. Sowle on April 5, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Prisoner of Conscience is not a delightful book, yet it is a book that keeps you mesmerized and enthralled to the end. It is a profound and deeply disturbing story of a young man set upon a task that he can not enjoy, overcoming the obstacles to come to grips of what he is and what he must do and not lose his humanity in the process. Susan R. Matthews weaves a story that captures the imagination and doesn't allow you to put it down until it is over, makes you want more.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 2, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
The second book in the 3-part series, it fleshes out Kosciusko's character and clarifies his moral code and courage. The only thing I found unsatisfactory about this book is the. points. in. the. dialogue. where. Ms. Matthews interjects periods. It's a good technique when used sparingly, but this book has about 50 uses too many. Irritating.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 4, 1998
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Imagine Serbs given free hand over Moslem prisoners in a Nazi-style work camp, and you'll have some kind of idea of how Pyana relate to the subjugated Nurail, and what kind of mess the protagonist Koscuisko has walked into as he takes up his duties as medical officer and Inquisitor at Domitt prison. For all that his duty requires that Andrej be a monster and a curse to the Nurail, his honor leads him to individual acts of compassion at considerable personal risk. It is interesting to watch the author lay down additional threads, begun in the first book and continued here, in what one suspects she will pull together and weave into the Koscuisko Legend. But seeing the threads does not mean we can guess the tapestry. The author works subtle surprises, like the element of mysticism in a book that would seem on its face to be brutally "hard" science fiction. Unlike all those books jamming the shelves where you know how it's going to end almost before you get started, and unlike all those authors content to give us the umpteenth re-working of the predictable same ol' same ol', Matthews keeps her story fresh and keeps us wondering where she is going. Prisoner of Conscience is a worthy successor to An Exchange of Hostages and I'm looking forward with much anticipation to the next installment. There is every reason to expect great things.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews