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89 of 91 people found the following review helpful
Casio Graphing Calculator (FX-9750GII-WE)
If you are on a tight budget, check out the link above for the 9750 GII by Casio. This is the best bargain of all graphics calculators. About the only things I find missing on this 50.00 calculator are geometry and spreadsheet apps. Mathematically, this is a powerhouse.
But, if you have a few extra dollars, you should definitely consider the Prizm. It has all the capabilities of the 9750, plus a spreadsheet and the best portable geometry software I have ever used. The hi-res color screen makes this possible, and it is a real breakthrough.
When you are using your computer (Linux, Windows, or Mac), be sure to download the free software "GeoGebra". The Prizm is a portable machine which does the mathematics of GeoGebra.
And finally, compare the Prizm to the remarkable apps being developed for the IPhone and IPad. The Prizm excels since it has a genuine keyboard and gives such beautiful results. (It also has a battery which lasts 140 hours as compared to the two hours on an IPhone.)
This calculator is truly superior. I use it extensively for solving difference equations,
carrying out statistical analyses, solving calculus problems, and exploring geometrical relationships.
This is the finest graphics calculator I have ever used in my many years of teaching mathematics. It is a beautiful tool to make mathematics really enjoyable.
Update: Jan16, 2011
You might get a Kindle Fire or IPod Touch and use WolframAlpha for CAS and three dimensional graphing. Store your math references on it. Store instruction manuals. But use the Prizm for the daily chores in math.
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48 of 52 people found the following review helpful
on May 23, 2011
I am a math department head at a private Bronx high school, and we chose the Casio line over the TI's when the school began 7 years ago. We did so because when comparing The TI and the Casio side by side, hands down, the Casio won, and it was cheaper as well. Note - I do not work for Casio or TI.

We have been slowly upgrading to the newer models ever since, of which the Prizm will be our latest incarnation. My experience with the Prizm has been nothing short of a series of "Wows" over and over again.

Here are some things to consider when comparing the TI and Casio.

A) The Casio is more user friendly. The options are menu driven in a more intuitive way. What took me a minute or two to locate and figure out out the TI, took less than half the time on the Casio. Don't trust me- see for yourself.
B) This Casio is blazing fast - more so than the TI's I work with when tutoring students in other schools.

C)Features: The casio adds a dynamic graphing system (lets you change a coefficient and watch the graph change), which is very useful when teaching. I also like the EQUA feature, which lets my students calculate 2/3 equations, 2/3 unknowns, and solve quadratic or polynomial equations. The TI does this too after you download programs. It is not nearly as intuitive.

D) The color is really nice! Necessary - no, but it does make lessons come alive.

E) There a number of additional features available only the Prizm, such as modelling equations off of points on pictures on the calculator. It is more than I have time to explore or use in class, but you might have fun with it.

The only downside is that most colleges use the TI's, unfortunately. I liken it to most places using Microsoft when there are better alternatives out there (monopoly power). Anyway, a student who uses the Casio can do anything the TI-83 can do and more.

I'm a big fan, and my students like it a lot.
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40 of 43 people found the following review helpful
on January 24, 2011
Casio outdid themselves with the Prizm FX-CG10. I am impressed by this calcualtor and its design.

First, the keys are large. You can press the keys and have full confidence that the right one will register. I really like the way Casio made the keyboard for this model.

Second, the screen. Color is only the beginning. The display is super clear. The menu items are readable, squinting is not required. An added plus is that when you enter parenthesis, they are in color - which makes it easy to tell which set of parenthesis you are working with. You can also choose which color a function is graphed (from a maximum of 8 colors though).

Third, speed. The Prizm does calculations and graphs fast. It might beat the earlier incarnations of the 9860G Series (Slim, GII, etc).

The function set is similar to the 9860GII and 9860G Slim. Programs can be transferred from the 9860G series with relative ease.

This calculator is easy to use, fun and a pleasure to use (because of the screen and colors). This is Casio's best calculator yet.
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24 of 27 people found the following review helpful
on February 4, 2011
Considering my vision is not as good as it used to be, the color display really helps reading the numbers, graphs, etc. Even though the programming capability is limited, the other functions (e.g., spreadsheet, lists) work well; although, they are also limited, such as the lack of standard deviation in the spreadsheet. Overall, however, I use this calculator more than the numerous others (mostly HP) that I own because of the display visibility.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on October 8, 2011
I work as a research biologist and purchased this to replace an aging Casio fx-300. I'm very impressed overall, particularly with the screen quality and range of applications in the menu -- the progress made in calculator technology really shows. The spreadsheet function has been most valuable so far, allowing me to quickly perform lengthy multi-step calculations in the lab and without heading back to the office to perform them in Excel. The spreadsheet is also excellent for preparing master mixes; for example, I have a column with the volumes needed to set up a single reaction, and another column that automatically calculates the volumes needed for X number of reactions specified in another cell -- simple but very handy. The graphing and solving abilities are also excellent -- allowing me to easily calculate at what time a cell culture will reach a desired cell density based on its current cell density and known exponential growth rate. The persistent memory of the calculator and ability to save files and functions is much appreciated and overall the calculator saves me time and the automation and memorization of certain calculations likely reduces the potential for human error.

My only gripe is that the screen is very scratch prone, so I would recommend purchasing some screen protection. I bought a screen protector pack designed for the iPhone and cut it to size, works great and just $0.81 cents including shipping: [...]
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on February 17, 2011
Use this for my microelectronics classes and works flawlessly (at least in the first week of use). It's great for working in polar or rectangular formats, converting and so forth. The spreadsheet is also very handy for data collection. Convert it to a cvs format and you can load it with excel on your computer. Own a ti-83, played with an Nspire for a day before I returned it. This is far better than both. The picture plot feature requires submitting a picture to casio for them to format to their proprietary format. I didn't think I'd use that application in any significant way anyhow, however it is fun to play with. The screen and the intuitive layout makes this calculator very user friendly. In a week of use I already know how to use more features than a whole semester with the clunky old ti-83. It does not use CAS as some of Texas Instruments. Don't know if that will be a hindrance to me in future math classes.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on September 22, 2011
This calculator is by far the best calculator I've ever owned. It works well for all kinds of math, from the simplest to most advanced math. It's color screen and big buttons are nice additions, and its also much faster than most TI calculators I've tried. Also, even though it has a color screen (which gets surprisingly bright) the battery life is remarkably long, I've had it for over a month now and the battery level is still full! It has more functions than most common TI calculators and is much more intuitive than the TI's. It's also becoming more common for teachers to support Casio calculators - so integrating them into your class should be easy. For such a cheap price, I expected something much less but got an amazing, durable calculator!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on December 31, 2014
Meh. If you look at it from a "power" or "capbility" viewpoint, what you're getting with this thing is just a bunch of purty colors. Big deal.

Now, why do I say that?

Here's why: You're paying extra, but you're STILL limited to solving 6 linear equations in 6 unknowns, just like the FX-9750GII. You're paying extra, but you're STILL limited to solving polynomials of degree 2 to a maximum of degree 6 , just like the FX-9750GII. You're paying extra, but you're STILL not able to tackle systems of NONLINEAR equations in two or more variables, just like the FX-9750GII. When it comes to shelling out more moolah ($) for a calculator, I want more muscle, i.e., computing power. You can't tell me with a straight face that TI can cram software in their 89 Titanium or Voyage 200 or Nspire that can handle 30 linear equations in 30 unknowns, along with a ridiculously powerful polynomial solver and the capability (howsoever kludgy) to do nonlinear systems, and Casio can't do ANYTHING to soup up their own devices for which they want more money---I ain't buyin' it. Literally. All you're getting is a box of crayons (colors) to go with what a cheaper calculator already offers. Does that make sense?!?
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Vine Customer Review of Free Product( What's this? )
The Casio fx-CG10 comes packaged in a hard clear plastic case which resisted all normal attempts to be opened. Frustrated, I finally resorted to a Dremel cut-off tool and sheared off the outer case. This allowed me to extract the calculator, the hard plastic faceplate (which can be installed as a backplate when the calculator is in use), a USB cable, a serial cable, a Utilities CD-ROM (Windows only), and the four AAA batteries necessary for operation. A printed Quick Start Guide was included. The calculator, received on 1/23/13, had version 1.0 of the software installed.

Upgrading the software requires a PC (not a Mac, though it works fine with a PC emulator on the Mac, which is how I tested it). I downloaded Version 1.04 of the software along with several other upgrades on the Casio site and installed them. That took a little time as I was trying to use my regular USB cable. The cable that comes with the Casio works perfectly but is slightly non-standard; don't lose it. I also added Physium, which displays an interactive Periodic Table and contains a number of standard mathematical constants that aren't otherwise in the calculator. The calculator has about 9MB of free memory once the operating system and basic components are all installed.

Upon initially turning on the calculator, you're faced with several color icons, as if you had opened up a folder on your computer. There's one for statistical activities, another for financial calculations, one for geometry, and so forth. How do I add 2+2, though? It's not entirely clear when turning on the calculator how you would quickly perform basic math. Luckily, this is the first option, mysteriously titled, "Run-Matrix." The screen itself is a significant upgrade to your average calculator display. There is extensive use of color where appropriate, and the screen generally presents black text on a white background, very much like a modern computer rather than an old-fashioned calculator display (such as on the HP 50g).

Although the calculator screen can be reproduced on a PC, this is not possible under the Mac OS. In either computer environment, you can boot up the Prizm and interact with its memory. Adding Physium, for instance, was as simple as dragging it from my download folder into the Prizm folder. It appears that there are many applications available for the Prizm, largely games which others have written and posted online.

The keyboard works well though I prefer the HP calculator keyset, which has a rectangular shape and cleaner clicking action. The Casio's buttons yaw and tilt to some extent and it's not necessarily clear that you have fully depressed a key as there is no subtle feedback as on the HP. Each key has three potential functions, modified with Shift and Alpha keys and indicated in yellow and red respectively. The red is difficult to read in low light. I'd like to see a Clear All function that clears the entire screen, but this is not here (at least not obviously so). There is a multidirectional button in the middle on the right that allows one to choose menu options; but then to select the chosen option, one has to hit the EXE key at the bottom right. I'd prefer if the multidirectional key could be depressed in the middle to make the selection as that is a typical interface on other keypads (e.g. remote controls, typically).

That said, the full manual, available for download and on the Utilities disc, is 601 pages long. This is not by any means a straight-forward calculator but rather a basic computer with a limited interface presented by the overall size of the unit. As such, extensive programming capabilities are present alongside the built-in application sets.

Overall, this is an advanced calculator with capabilities akin to a computer including animation, spreadsheet, extensive personal storage, and interface capabilities to computers and projectors. It can even be connected to other Prizms so that information can be shared. I'd like to see a somewhat more intuitive UI in the future, but otherwise the capabilities are here. This should serve the vast majority of students through high school and college.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on February 23, 2014
The Casio Prizm is far and away the best graphing calculator in terms of price, performance, and features.
This innovative calculator (3 years old) can be picked up for less than the price of the aging TI 84 Plus (nearly 20 years old).
It has a 32-bit SH-4 RISC processor which leaves the 8-bit Z-80 processor of the TI 84 line in the dust.
It's graphing features are easier to use and much more flexible than those found on the TI 84. For example, no need to specify left and right bounds for determining roots of an equation and all graph functions are available via soft function key presses (clearly labeled at the bottom of the graphing screen). Both y= and x= equations can be graphed (TI 84 only allows graphing of y= equations). The Modify graph feature allows viewing changes to parameters of the standard types of algebraic and trig functions - an impressive feature which facilitates a student's understanding of function behavior - and not as easily implemented on the TI 84. The ability to model and graph real life recursive functions (such as compound interest) is yet another unique feature of this graphing calculator.
There are many YouTube videos covering all aspects of this calculator - no need to crack the manual for learning how to use it. Start off by viewing the "Guided Tour" videos (5 - 10 minutes each) and you can be productive with this amazing tool in under an hour. For more advanced features - the SeeMathRun series of videos is very instructive as well.
In summary, this is the most underrated and easy to use (watch the "GuidedTour" videos on YouTube) graphing calculator out there and definitely gives the "greatest bang for the buck". .
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