Programming Books C Java PHP Python Learn more Browse Programming Books
Qty:1
  • List Price: $39.99
  • Save: $10.07 (25%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: While this book has been loved by someone else, they left it in great condition. Hurry and buy it before someone else does and take advantage of our FREE Super Saver Shipping!!!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Pro Active Record: Databases with Ruby and Rails (Expert's Voice) Paperback – September 13, 2007


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, September 13, 2007
$29.92
$0.01 $0.01
Amazon%20Web%20Services
Interested in Databases? Amazon Web Services provides fully managed relational and NoSQL database services. Get started for free.


Frequently Bought Together

Pro Active Record: Databases with Ruby and Rails (Expert's Voice) + Ruby on Rails Tutorial: Learn Web Development with Rails (2nd Edition) (Addison-Wesley Professional Ruby Series)
Price for both: $59.40

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Shop the new tech.book(store)
New! Introducing the tech.book(store), a hub for Software Developers and Architects, Networking Administrators, TPMs, and other technology professionals to find highly-rated and highly-relevant career resources. Shop books on programming and big data, or read this week's blog posts by authors and thought-leaders in the tech industry. > Shop now

Product Details

  • Series: Expert's Voice
  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Apress; 1 edition (September 13, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1590598474
  • ISBN-13: 978-1590598474
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 7 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,372,300 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Chad Pytel is president of thoughtbot, Inc., a software development consulting firm that specializes in agile, test-driven web application development using the Ruby on Rails framework and located in Boston and New York City. A firm believer in the Model-View-Controller design pattern and realistic software development, with a history in Java and EJB development, Chad strongly believes that Ruby and Ruby on Rails represents a new, exciting, and better way to develop software. Chad lives with his wife in Somerville, Massachusetts. When not at the office managing projects and writing code, Chad enjoys acting in and producing theater, film, and improv comedy. To follow along with Chad and the rest of the thoughtbot team's thoughts on business, design, development, and technology, visit their blog at Giantrobots.thoughtbot.com.

Jon Yurek is chief technology officer at thoughtbot, Inc. Born a programmer, Jon has been developing software professionally since 1999. After seeing the elegant and expressive power of Ruby, Jon quickly moved all new development at thoughtbot away from Java and Perl to using Ruby and Rails. Jon is a graduate of Worcester Polytechnic Institute and currently lives in Somerville, Massachusetts.

Kevin Marshall is a software developer at heart. He is a consultant to a number of companies and currently runs 50+ sites of his own many of which are now happily taking advantage of ActiveRecord with the Ruby on Rails framework, including the popular DraftWizard.com. As a technology writer, Kevin has published a short article, "Web Services with Rails," contributed a few recipes to the Ruby Cookbook, and contributed a number of articles to the Association of Computing Machinery's periodical, Computing Reviews (available online at Reviews.com).

Kevin is also a member of the Pro Football Writers Association, the Fantasy Sports Trade Association, and the Fantasy Sports Writers Association. When he's not deep into coding, building content, or talking football, he's generally off playing with his sons. To learn more about what he's up to right now, you can visit his company site, Falicon.com, or just drop him a note at info@falicon.com.


More About the Author

Chad Pytel is founder and CEO of thoughtbot, inc. a leading software development firm that specializes in agile, test-driven web application development using Ruby on Rails. He currently lives in Newton, MA with his wife and son.

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 23 people found the following review helpful By James Stewart on October 24, 2007
Format: Paperback
Right at the start of Pro Active Record the authors address a possible problem some may have with it: that there's not enough in Active Record to warrant a full book. They point out that the basics are well covered as sections elsewhere but that this is the first book to really dig into working with legacy schema and other `advanced' uses. That's fair enough, but after reading the book I am still left with the question of why, then, they dedicate the first half to covering ActiveRecord's most basic concepts?

Judging from postings on the rails email list, there's certainly a lot of confusion about ActiveRecord, associations, observers, how to work with legacy table names and primary keys, and so on. But in a book with a title prefix of "Pro" I was expecting to jump straight into the nitty gritty of topics like compound/composite primary keys and performance tuning, probably with some real world examples, and maybe with a serious exploration of AR's internals. As it is, such topics only get a quick treatment in the final chapter (the compound/composite primary keys section is a paragraph referring users to a plugin).

It's almost always instructive reading other developers' code and it would be unfair to claim that I didn't spot a couple of tips that may prove useful, but they were passing things. And sometimes I found myself wondering what happened to the tech review process, particularly in the coverage of the has_one association, where not only is the variable naming confusing, but they seem to be calling the each method on a single ActiveRecord instance.

I'm left wondering what the audience is for this book.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By J. Pease on November 12, 2007
Format: Paperback
Visuals:
Font size and layout are good. Easy on the eyes. Large and frequent sub-headings make it easier to locate information.

Audience:
The book lists it's intended "User level" at "Intermediate-Advanced".

Practicality:
It really depends on what you are expecting. I've been using Rails and ActiveRecord for about 2 years, so I should fit into the target audience. After reading the book I still think it will be a great reference book to have within arm's reach while working with ActiveRecord. To me it will serve as an API to AR. So it will be practical in that sense.

On the other hand, while reading it I never experienced any "aha!" moments where I felt like I learned something new or exciting, which I had hoped for from a "Pro" book.

If you are a beginner (never having used AR) it will definitely save you time (and eye strain) hunting down tutorials on blogs.

Overall:
It's a good Active Record reference & usage tutorial(s). I would have appreciated this book even more when I was first starting to use the Ruby on Rails framework. So if you are a beginner, don't let the "Intermediate - Advanced" user level scare you off. If you are using Rails, even as a beginner, you will probably be using Active Record too. In fact I think this book would probably be better named "Beginning Active Record" instead of "Pro Active Record".

I was kind of surprised when I read the Introduction to the book that it starts off with:

"Is there really enough to talk about in Active Record to fill a whole book?"

"Our answer, then and now, is, "Yes and no""

As an "Intermediate - Advanced" user, that's kind of how I felt at the end of this "Pro" book.

I give the book 4 stars, with the assumption that you go into it with the expectation of "Beginning Active Record".
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Charles Harvey on September 21, 2007
Format: Paperback
ProActive Record fills a void in RoR texts. From some of the descriptions I was worried that the book would be too focused on using ActiveRecord without rails. My assumptions were unfounded.

By having basically unrestricted space to focus on one part of the MVC framework, the book is able to go into much deeper discussion about many of the topics on ActiveRecord covered only partially in previous Rails texts.

This book focuses on the practical instead of the abstract to its credit.
One chapter is devoted entirely to real world issues in a Q and A style that most every Rails developer will eventually face. It is more like participating in a lab rather than being preached to in a classroom.

Note while this book does not target total beginners it is extremely useful for someone who is past the newbie stage.

Highly recommended for the RoR professional.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By C. Young on June 4, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
My team was midway into our first big Ruby on Rails project, and we were having some problems with database interaction. We were migrating an older, fairly complicated database from MS SQL Server and C# .Net to RoR and MySQL. This book walked us through exactly how to handle some of those complicated situations, like how to update two tables from the same form, with one table having one row updated and the other table having several rows updated. I would consider the book perfect for anyone migrating a database from an older system.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Alex P. Keaton on October 4, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
No fear of the legacy database!

Excellent book overall, but Chapter 7 is what takes the cake for me.
It's generally considered a pain to use ROR with legacy databases, but
K.Marshall et al, show that it is not only doable, but not bad at all.

Excellent examples and explanations, showing code in a step by step approach - starting at the very beginning (what active record is, configuring/installing it, etc...).

At the same time, the style is extremely laid back (at times the authors poke a bit of fun at each other), which is always welcomed when learning something new.

Great book and great choice to include information on getting active record working with legacy databases.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images