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Pro JavaFX 2: A Definitive Guide to Rich Clients with Java Technology Paperback – February 28, 2012

ISBN-13: 978-1430268727 ISBN-10: 1430268727 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 640 pages
  • Publisher: Apress; 1 edition (February 28, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1430268727
  • ISBN-13: 978-1430268727
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 1.4 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,456,412 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Jim Weaver is an author, speaker, teacher, and developer in rich Internet application technologies such as JavaFX, and may be contacted at jim.weaver@javafxpert.com.

Weiqi Gao is a principal software engineer with Object Computing, Inc. in St. Louis, Missouri. He has more than 15 years of software development experience and has been using Java technology since 1998. He is interested in programming languages, object-oriented systems, distributed computing, and graphical user interfaces. He is a member of the steering committee of the St. Louis Java Users Group. Weiqi holds a Ph.D. in mathematics.

Open-source developer and agile manager Stephen Chin is founder of numerous open-source projects including WidgetFX and JFXtras, and senior manager at Inovis in Emeryville, California. He has been working with Java desktop and enterprise technologies for more than a decade, and has a passion for improving development technologies and process. Stephen's interest in Java technologies has lead him to start a Java- and JavaFX- focused blog that is targeted at early technology adopters (SteveOnJava.com).

Dean Iverson has been writing software professionally for more than 15 years. He is employed by the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute, where he is a senior researcher and rich client application developer. He also has a small software consultancy called Pleasing Software Solutions, which he co-founded with his wife.

Johan Vos is a Java Champion who started to work with Java in 1995. As part of the Blackdown team, he helped port Java to Linux. With LodgON, the company he cofounded, he has been mainly working on Java-based solutions for social networking software. His main focus is on end-to-end Java, combining the strengths of backend systems and embedded devices. His favorite technologies are currently Java EE/Glassfish at the backend and JavaFX at the frontend. He contributes to a number of open source projects, including DataFX and the Android port of JavaFX. Johan’s blog can be followed at http://blogs.lodgon.com/johan, he tweets at http://twitter.com/johanvos, and can be reached at johan@lodgon.com.

Customer Reviews

You'll learn much better and faster.
Okur Yazar
For those looking for a quick summary, here it is: Overall, I thought it was a really good book that should get you up and running with JavaFX very quickly.
Amazon Customer
I say the book is really nothing more than a list of things that you will need to look up in the JavaDocs and research online.
Grant S. Robertson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Grant S. Robertson on February 24, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
How this book gets good reviews just boggles my mind. About the only good thing I can say about this book is that it gives a little bit of information that is not mentioned in the JavaDocs.The general pattern of every section goes about like this:

"X is an important new feature in JavaFX. We are going to tell you all about X. Here is an example which uses X."

[A several page example where X is used but is obfuscated pretty badly because most of the code uses advanced features of Java or JavaFX that have not even been mentioned yet and/or the example uses inconsistently named classes, objects, and variables and there are few comments.]

[An incredibly brief, paragraph or two, discussion of the example which rarely explains what is doing what and why. Essentially, this text usually just mentions that X was done or used without even telling you where. Every once in a while they will smuggle in some incredibly important fact buried in the middle of a paragraph, mentioned almost as an afterthought. It is usually some gotcha to watch out for that the creators of JavaFX probably don't want to advertize too loudly.]

"Now that you have mastered X we will tell you about Y."

Section heading

"Now that you know all about X it is time to tell you all about Y."

And the pattern repeats itself over and over.

The authors highly recommend that the reader have access to the JavaDocs while reading this book. I say the book is really nothing more than a list of things that you will need to look up in the JavaDocs and research online. The authors were obviously more concerned with filling space than actually explaining anything.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Kai Wähner on April 18, 2012
Format: Paperback
The book gives an introduction to JavaFX 2, a web framework for realizing Rich Internet Applications (RIA). Overall, this is good book. If you want to get started with JavaFX 2, then you should buy this book. The book is easy to read and has good code examples (which you can download, too) for every feature.

Content
The book begins with a "getting started" chapter, which explains the initial setup of software and tools, and explains the basic concepts. This is what you need when you start with a new technology.

Afterwards, several chapters go into more detail about creating a user interface, defining properties and bindings, and using UI controls. After reading these chapters, you are ready to realize your first JavaFX application.

The next chapter explains the thread concept of JavaFX. This is very important to understand for writing responsive applications. After reading this chapter, you can start programming production-ready JavaFX clients. Of course, you also need to connect to a backend, so the chapter "accessing web services" is a must-read for developer who do not write standalone applications. The book explains several ways how to connect to a backend via XML or JSON. Even several addons and frameworks are mentioned including code examples (e.g. RESTFX or Jersey).

Further chapters describe how to use advanced UI controls for creating charts or including media files.

The last chapter describes how to use alternative JVM languages and layout markup languages besides Java, namely Groovy, Scala, FXML, and Visage. This chapter is awesome.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on April 3, 2012
Format: Paperback
For those looking for a quick summary, here it is: Overall, I thought it was a really good book that should get you up and running with JavaFX very quickly.

Now, the details. As I said, I think this is a very solid technical book, which is hard thing to accomplish. Some books are really dry and overly technical, making them hard to read and reference, while others are fun to read, but shallow and not very helpful. This book, though, strikes a great balance, I think. There's a wealth of knowledge, but I found it flows pretty well and doesn't bog the user down in the super technical details. I do, though, read a fair number of these types of books, so maybe I'm numbed to that. Your mileage may vary. : )

Chapter 1, "Getting a Jump Start in JavaFX", might be the most important, as it introduces the technology to the user. Lose him here, and the rest of the book is worthless to him. The authors did a great job of working through a simple, yet functional application, hitting the high points. They didn't spend a great deal of time on the details, but gave the reader enough to grasp kinda-sorta what's going on. There is tons of source code and pictures, which is extremely helpful. You don't have to go download the source and glance back and forth between the book and your computer. It's literally all right there.

Chapter 2 deals with "Creating a User Interface in JavaFX". The component library in JavaFX is large and growing, so the book can't (and shouldn't) cover all of them, this chapter hits some of the major ones, showing how to put them on the screen, lay them out, have them respond to events like mouse clicks, etc. Again, there is a lot of source code, giving the reader plenty of complete examples right the book to follow.
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