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on May 17, 2011
To some extent, this book does what it says: it gives you the PROCESSES of constitutional decision making by presenting scattered material more or less chronologically. However, the organization of this book is a complete and utter failure, and is probably useless to most american law student enrolled in a constitutional law course. Law students will be tested on doctrine, not abstract historical narrative. True, the historical context in which a case is brought is of importance to understanding how and why the Court reached a decision, but this casebook elevates historical narrative at the expense of a necessary focus on the doctrinal point at issue. The book's interest in illustrating the historical evolution of Supreme Court decision making is not unimportant, but would be of much greater service to students (and professors, who all too often lack the ability to TEACH material in a class beyond their particular research interest) if the historical narrative was subdivided doctrinally. In short, rather than present ridiculous chapter headings such as "The Taney Court and the Civil War" or pointless sub-headings such as "The Cases of 1803," this book could (and should) have broken down the text into areas of law to shown students how each area of law (commerce clause, due process, equal protection, etc.) evolved and addressed particular sub-areas over time. In short, if you actually want to understand constitutional law (including it's historical revolution within a particular area), you'd be better off looking to Erwin Chemerinsky's treatise, Constitutional Law: Principles And Policies (Introduction to Law Series), which combines concise summaries of doctrinal decisions with historical narrative and, best of all, the addresses underlying tensions between cases in a way much more effective than an ambiguous case note infused with shameless citations of other authors without effective editing.
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on July 4, 2012
Not the greatest legal text. I realize Constitutional opinions are friggin' long, but this book is still too much. They should cut at least 20% of it. I had a really hard time lugging this massive thing around Boston all the time. Plus, it just wasn't the greatest casebook to begin with; too wordy and too superfluous.
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on May 15, 2014
This book has a perfunctory, but also a relatively boring writing style. Though, considering the subject matter, I have to give the authors credit for making the subject as enjoyable as they did. That being said, the actual book is too long, the type face is minuscule, and the pages are so thin that you can actually see through the page to the type on the other side. Honestly, I got a headache every time I tried to read, just simply due to the formatting, since the authors tried to cram as much as they could into the book, despite the fact that the book is already over 1800 pages long.
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on August 3, 2014
Terrible.

Difficult to read and incredibly boring.

Do yourself a favor and get the Chemerinsky treatise.
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on January 8, 2013
Just what I needed for class. Easy to follow for the most part and able to get what I needed out of it!
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on September 3, 2014
Good quality, but not new.
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on September 30, 2008
The textbook approaches Con Law with a thorough historical perspective. It truly delivers a framework for the PROCESS of "Constitutional Decision Making."
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on September 27, 2010
Seriously, this book is just awful. But I guess if you're in law school there's no helping that.
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on January 21, 2014
I wish there was an option to pay more for a better quality book. The book I received was WAY to highlighted and written in to be of any use.
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on August 25, 2013
This is absolutely ridiculous. I purchased a used-acceptable version of a law book and I received a book that BARELY had its binding attached. Not only is the book unable to be used because it falls apart, the inside is literally FILLED with highlighting and notes written in black and blue ink throughout the entire book. I wasted $150.00 on this terrible book!! This seller is absolutely SCAMMING everyone who buys a book or item through them. Please think twice before giving your money to this seller, you will most likely be disappointed and stuck with an useable item. Due to this incredible inconvenience, I must start my first year of law school with a book I cannot even read, thank so much for an absolutely horrible experience with Amazon.com.
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