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Professional Data Warehousing with SQL Server 7.0 and OLAP Services Paperback – January, 2000


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Product Details

  • Series: Professional
  • Paperback: 600 pages
  • Publisher: Peer Information Inc. (January 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1861002815
  • ISBN-13: 978-1861002815
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 1.4 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,251,807 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Written for those who work with databases on the SQL Server 7 platform, Professional Data Warehousing with SQL Server 7.0 and OLAP Services gives you what you need to implement a data warehouse successfully. This hands-on tutorial exploits the built-in capabilities of various Microsoft tools.

Besides a general introduction to the world of data warehouses (and data marts) done the Microsoft way, this book is best at showing you how to master tools like OLAP Manager, which lets you effectively create and manage data warehouses. There are dozens of screen shots for a variety of tools in action, including the Data Transformation Services (DTS) Designer (for transforming data from one source to another) and the powerful PivotTable tool (which can be used to analyze information).

This tools-based approach means that you can get up and running with OLAP tools without understanding every theoretical detail. (The book does cover the basics here, but it's the practical focus that will make it useful to the working data architect.) There is also coverage of the powerful (and somewhat quirky) Multidimensional Expressions (MDX) from Microsoft, which extends SQL for querying against dimensional data in "cubes." Chapters on basic and advanced MDX will show you how to get the most out of this standard with your databases. (For samples, the book relies mainly on case studies from the Microsoft Web site.)

It used to be that data warehousing required a lot more work just to get started. Armed with Microsoft tools and this capable guide, most anyone can plan and build a data warehouse successfully for SQL Server 7. This is a solid how-to on an essential topic in enterprise database development. --Richard Dragan

Topics covered: Online Analytical Processing (OLAP) and data warehouse basics; data marts; data mining; Microsoft OLAP and tools; Data Transformation Services (DTS); metadata and the Microsoft Repository; MS OLAP architecture for servers and clients; dimensions and OLAP cubes; drill-down and roll-up; slicing and dicing; star, constellation, and snowflake schemas; virtual cubes; partitions; project design for data warehouses; case studies from Microsoft; techniques for capturing data; OLAP Manager tutorial; using the cube editor; DTS packages and the DTS designer; automating data transformation; data-driven queries; bulk inserts with BCP; beginning and advanced Multidimensional Expressions (MDX); OLAP presentation; using PivotTable; design considerations for data marts; data mining basics; statistics and third-party tools; security; administration and maintenance for data warehouses; replication techniques; optimization and tuning.

From the Publisher

This book discusses the architecture of a data warehouse, and introduces the concept of multidimensional data representation using Microsoft OLAP. This book provides a complete introduction to designing, building and tuning Datawarehouses using SQL Server 7. There are many features new to SQL Server 7 that facilitate storage, retrieval, analysis and distribution of large amounts of data from Data Warehouses. This book covers them all in detailed examples - as well as showing how to design and build a bespoke Datawarehouse in SQL Server. OLAP and Microsoft Decision Support Services, ROLAP, and HOLAP options are covered. How to maximize performance using the new Query Analyzer, Tuning Wizard, and SQL Profiler tools is included as well as how to implement incremental backup. This will enable the analysis of large amounts of complex information with the latest data warehousing technologies. By reading this book you'll learn how best to employ data warehousing and OLAP in your business and how to leverage it to provide your organization with improved revenue and profitability.

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Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Jerry Tucker on March 20, 2000
Format: Paperback
While WROX Press usually covers programming topics well, this title is an exception. I've read all three books on MS OLAP. Many of the MDX examples are incorrect in syntax (no quotes where required, or CREATE SET SESSION instead of CREATE SESSION SET). It also blithely talks about syntax that MS OLAP doesn't support (like sets in the WHERE clause) without letting you know you're wasting your time trying it. Some errors, like multiple descriptions of and references to the non-existent CREATE SET GLOBAL, or stating that drill-down functions don't work on tuples when they do, state clearly that the author doesn't really know Microsoft's MDX. The author makes other odd claims, for example that virtual dimensions are useful for security (how?)
I found it really interesting that area after area (discussions of preparing a database, discussions of MDX, database optimization, many of the diagrams, the discussion of NULL values and invalid member references, a large number of small asides) follow the outline, diagrams, examples and occasionally unique terminology of "Microsoft OLAP Solutions" fairly closely, including idiosyncrasies such as the attention to dealing with irregular hierarchies in more depth than leveled hierarchies early on, and yet goes into far less depth. It strains belief that the author didn't study this prior work and borrow heavily.
It also disappoints in the areas where it could have offered some unique insights. Unlike the other two books, it devotes a small chapter to types of data mining, and offers in chapter introduction that it will discuss whether OLAP Services supports data mining. At the very end of the chapter, he only says that "Microsoft has yet to come up with a ...
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 1, 2000
Format: Paperback
The writing in this book is very incoherent. It is really hard to read and the author rambles on and on about useless obvious things. The examples provided are erroneous. What the author calls a very complex sql query is actually a very basic sql query and on top of that is incorrect. Example: in trying to count the num of transactions, the author made the mistake of sum(tran_id) instead of count(tran_id). If he cannot write a simple select statement how could he provide input on data warehousing. I got more information from SQL OLAP Tutorial in the books online than from reading the 1st 4 chapters. Also the author does not provide any solid examples drawn from his experience. It appears as though he is summarizing the books online and another great data warehousing book, "The Data Warehouse Lifecycle Toolkit" by Ralph Kimball.
Save your money and look for another book.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 19, 2000
Format: Paperback
A better title maybe "Professional Data Warehousing with OLAP Services in SQLServer 7.0". As a designer and developer of a data warehouse back-end, I thought I had found a great book to enlighten me as to SQLServer7 specific data warehousing techniques, but in reality the author rarely deviates from discussing OLAP in SQLServer and data cubes. If you're looking for information on creating and optimizing a data warehouse as a back-end system, I would highly suggest looking elsewhere. Although there is basically no discussion of data warehousing, the book "Transact-SQL Programming" offers a much more well rounded approach to the awsome capabilities of SQLServer.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By John Ressidi on April 19, 2000
Format: Paperback
This is the best and most comprehensive book I read or reviewed about MS OLAP and data warehousing. It has it all. It discusses MDX, DTS, Multidimensional data modling, data warehouse design, maintenance, and even a brief discussion of decision support objects in an appendix. The only thing I think it lacks is a discussion of ADO-MD and examples of how it can be used to access OLAP data from client apps. I hope the next edition will cover these topics along with the new topics in SQL 2000 OLAP Services. If you are out looking for a good book on MS OLAP, you found your wish with this book.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Carl Malek on April 10, 2000
Format: Paperback
I found this book to be the best among several book I reviewed about SQL Server data warehousing and OLAP. It handles most topics in a way that sets you on the right path to knowing what you need to know to do the job. It did help me, as a beginner, to smoothly start my first MS OLAP project. Of course, no one book can equally cover aspects of data warehousing. Therefore, this book will serve more as an intro, and in some cases, more than an intro to the world of MS DW.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Jim Peek on September 7, 2000
Format: Paperback
I was hesitant to buy this book at first when I read some of the reviews online. However, when I started to look at it in the book store I found that it is the book that the book was very nicely written and structured. It is written for someone who does not have a background in data warehousing and OLAP, but yet, provides a great deal of knowledge by the time you finish reading it. I found that the book satisfies my needs. I have been using this book as a reference for Microsfot OLAP Services for the last three months and it helped me with a couple of projects already. For those who do not like the book, please keep in mind that if it does not satisfy your particular need, it does not mean that it is not a good book that can help others.
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