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Professional JSP 2nd Edition Paperback – April, 2001

ISBN-13: 067-6623049582 ISBN-10: 1861004958 Edition: 2nd

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Product Details

  • Series: Programmer to Programmer
  • Paperback: 1000 pages
  • Publisher: Wrox Press; 2 edition (April 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1861004958
  • ISBN-13: 978-1861004956
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 7.2 x 2.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,313,143 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

This book is for professional Java programmers who want to use JSP and Servlets to create the web front end of their J2EE applications, and to see how these technologies separate presentation from the generation of dynamic content. No knowledge of JSP or Servlets is required, but the reader is assumed to be familiar with the Java language and core APIs. Some knowledge of XML and EJB will be of benefit, but is not essential.

About the Author

Based in London, Simon Brown is a senior software engineer with over 4 years experience of Java and related technologies. He has acted as technical lead and mentor to others as well as writing and delivering training material. Outside of work he has spoken at several Java events including JavaOne 2000, and has an article published on javaworld.com. Simon has a First class BSc (hons) degree in Computer Science from the University of Reading and is a Sun Certified Enterprise Architect for J2EE, and a Certified Developer for the Java 2 Platform. He can be e-mailed at simon_g_brown@yahoo.com.

Robert Burdick is an industry veteran with 14 years software design and development experience. He is president and founder of wAppearances, a consulting and training firm specializing in mobile and wireless computing.

Darko Cokor, born in 1970, graduated in 1997 from Zagreb with a major in Computer Sciences and is now working towards his Mr.Sc. He currently works as a Senior Consultant with all things Java, Perl, Apache, Servlet, Linux, JSP and much more.

Jayson Falkner is a full time student at the University of Miami pursuing a degree in Information Technology. He has been programming in Java for the past year and a half and is now focusing on JSP. Jayson is the CTO of Amberjack Software LLC and Webmaster of JSP Insider. In his spare time Jayson likes to program in binary and write not-so-funny jokes using XML.

Ben Galbraith first started programming when he was eight years old. He spent a considerable amount of his youth as a hobby programmer. In his late teens, he was hired by a Silicon Valley computer manufacturer to develop Windows-based client-server applications. In 1995, Mr. Galbraith began developing for the web and fell in love with Unix, VI, and Perl. After some years as an Internet consultant, Mr. Galbraith now leads the Java development team at an insurance company in Salt Lake City. He regularly lectures, evangelizes and gives classes on Java technology.

Rod Johnson is an enterprise Java architect specialising in scalable web applications. He is currently designing a J2EE solution for FT.com, Europe's largest business portal. After an arts degree majoring in music and computer science, Rod completed a Ph.D. in musicology before returning to software development. Rod has worked with Java on both client and server since its release, and has concentrated on Internet development since 1996. His main interests are J2EE architecture, EJB and OO web development. He can be reached at rod.johnson@bigfoot.com.

Larry Kim is a Technologist with netNumina, a systems integrator of customized distributed financial applications. He completed an undergraduate degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Waterloo, and is finishing graduate studies in distributed computing. He was the former Product Manager for the JRun Server at Allaire, and has co-authored several other books on Java Server Programming. Please come see his technical session on JSP web application frameworks & tag patterns at JavaOne 2001, the official Sun Microsystems Java Developer Conference.

Casey Kochmer's professional programming experience spans the past 11 years. Since 1996 his emphasis has been on web development using the server side web languages. Now actively promoting JSP, Casey is a co-founder of JSPInsider.com, a web site devoted to technical support for programmers making the jump to this development environment. Casey is also President of Amberjack Software LLC.

Thor Kristmundsson is a Freelance Developer specializing in distributed computing. He lives in Aalborg, Denmark with his wife Unnur and son Arnar (4).

Sing Li, bitten by the microcomputer bug since 1978, has grown up with the microprocessor age. His first personal computer was a $99 do-it-yourself Netronics COSMIC ELF computer with 256 bytes of memory, mail ordered from the back pages of Popular Electronics magazine. Currently, Sing is an active author, consultant, and entrepreneur. He has written for popular technical journals and is the creator of the "Internet Global Phone", one of the very first Internet phones available. His wide-ranging consulting expertise spans Internet and Intranet systems design, distributed architectures, digital convergence, embedded systems, real-time technologies, and cross platform software design. Recently, he has completed an assignment with Nortel Multimedia Labs working in Computer Telephony Integration, and Advanced Callcenter Management products. Sing is a founder of microWonders, an emerging company specializing in products to fulfill the ubiquitous "computing anywhere" vision. He is also an active participant in the Jini community.

Dan Malks is an Enterprise Java Architect with Sun Microsystems, working in the Sun Java Center in McLean, VA. He received a Master of Science degree in Computer Science from John Hopkins University in 1996 after having earned a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science from the College of William and Mary in1987. While focusing on Object-Oriented technologies, he has developed in a variety of environments, including Smalltalk and most recently Java. He has published a number of articles about Java in leading industry periodicals, in addition to being a contributing author to Pro JSP. Currently, he has been focusing on Distributed, Service-based architectural designs, patterns and implementations.

Mark Nelson is currently a software engineer for Distributed Object Technologies (DOTech), a Sun Microsystems Authorized Java Center. A graduate of the University of Connecticut, Mark holds a degree in Computer Engineering. He has been developing in Java since 1996 with a focus on applications and server side programming. Mark can be contacted at mark@dotech.com.

Grant Palmer has worked as a scientific programmer in the Space Technology Division at the NASA Ames Research Center for the past 15 years. He has worked with Java since 1996 developing programs for scientific applications as well as converting older FORTRAN and C codes to the Java platform. Grant lives in Chandler, Arizona with his wife, Lisa, and his two sons, Jackson and Zachary. In his spare time, Grant enjoys skiing and gardening, and is a competitive swimmer. He also likes to watch movies and read historical fiction.

Bob Sullivan has been building large-scale software systems for almost 20 years. He is a co-founder of Distributed Object Technologies (DOTech), Inc., a Sun Microsystems Authorized Java Center that enables its clients to leverage Java, XML and related technologies to construct IT systems and solutions that provide a competitive edge. He has been developing and teaching Object Oriented systems since 1985. Prior to starting DOTech, he was a Systems Engineer with Sun Microsystems where he architected enterprise solutions for large corporate customers. He has a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering from the University of Hartford (1982), and a Masters of Science in Computer Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (1987). He can be reached at sully@dotech.com.

Geoff Taylor is a Senior Software Engineer and has worked at Kainos Software Ltd for the last 8 years. He wrote his first web application in PL-SQL in 1995 (back when web programming was hard) and is impressed with how much simpler it all is now. He can be reached at g.taylor@kainos.com.

John Timney is a postgraduate of Nottingham University having gained an MA in Information Technology following a BA Honours Degree from Humberside University. John currently works for Syntegra at their Newcastle office and specializes in Internet development. His computer expertise has gained him a Microsoft MVP (Most Valuable Professional) award.

Sameer Tyagi writes regularly for online and print publications. He has over four years of experience in software design and development and specializes in server side Java based distribution applications. (N-Tier architectures, JDBC, JNDI, EJB, JMS, RMI, JSP, Servlets et al). He has a Bachelors in Electronic Engineering and numerous other certifications.

Geert van Damme studied Mathematical Psychology and Philosophy but ended up working in the IT business after a short while. In 1997 he started his own development and consulting company Darling, currently focusing on server side Java. Since then he has worked as an independent consultant on a number of projects. He can be reached at geert.vandamme@darling.be.

Steve Wilkinson is a hands on software developer with over 13 years experience. Steve is currently a Principal with Elkhorn Creek Software Inc. where he concentrates on design and implementation of web based applications using Java technologies. Steve has been using Java technologies since 1996. He has worked on projects for companies that range from start-ups to fortune 500 companies like Sun Microsystems, MCI, BellSouth and IBM. In these previous positions, Steve has used various Java technologies, such as RMI, Java Servlets, JHTML, JavaServer Pages, Java Applications and Java Applets. Steve has written on Pro JSP.


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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 5, 2001
Format: Paperback
Wrox Press continues their time-honored tradional of piling as many authors into one 1200 page volume that they can in the hopes that they will end up with a definitive treatment of the subject. The authors range from seasoned professionals with real-world experience to pimple-faced hacks with nothing but a year or two of college computer science courses behind them. .... I must confess that I am not sure what I was expecting in these chapters but since JSP Tag Libraries seemed to be one of the more challenging and interesting areas of JSPs I was hoping for some more meaningful, 'meaty' content.
The assembly of these 18 (yes, 18!) authors wind up generating a book that essentially could have been put together with more precision and continuity if it had 15 fewer authors. It very much comes off as a rushed effort, without any tightness whatsoever. The writing style of this second edition can only be described as amateurish. This, fortunately, can be a little easier to swallow if you accept the spirit of the book (in Wrox's words 'Programmer to Programmer'). Take the text as quickly put-together material from programmers that have been through it (even if it was brief or only in school) and you should be fine.
Many unnecessary forward references exist throughout the text and, because of the unusually large number of authors, there is a large amount of repetition in the body of most chapters. The book's page count could also have been greatly reduced had the authors not consistently given condensed introduction to material that ends up being the subject matter for entire chapters later in the book. For example, two early chapters describe the basics of Tag Libraries, only to have them surface as the primary topic of chapters 8 - 11.
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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on May 17, 2001
Format: Paperback
Well, i bought this book with one aim: Be able to learn and actually write JSP in limited terms. Since I found a job where they wanted me to do JSP, and I was doing ASP for last 2 years. This book has even section for ASP developers on how to move to JSP. So, with this book, I was able to write jsp in a week or so. ok, Now, actually about the book:
a) Great code explanation provided, as usual in any WROX books
b) Great code examples (especially voting application and database explorer one)
c) Tomcat and MySQL tutorial make my life easier, so i don't have to browse their sites for help - I have everything in one place (well, not everything -- but still, better then nothing)
d) Yes, price is kind of high, but, they got so much in one book, so i'm pretty sure that you will be glad once you buy it
I'd recommend this book for people who have to move from ASP (or any other programming language) to JSP. I would not recommend it to someone who is new to programming.
Thanks for all authors. Great Job.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on August 5, 2002
Format: Paperback
Wrox Press continues their time-honored tradional of piling as many authors into one 1200 page volume that they can in the hopes that they will end up with a definitive treatment of the subject. The authors range from seasoned professionals with real-world experience to people with nothing but a year or two of college computer science courses behind them. I must confess that I am not sure what I was expecting in these chapters but since JSP Tag Libraries seemed to be one of the more challenging and interesting areas of JSPs I was hoping for some more meaningful, 'meaty' content.
The assembly of these 18 (yes, 18!) authors wind up generating a book that essentially could have been put together with more precision and continuity if it had 15 fewer authors. It very much comes off as a rushed effort, without any tightness whatsoever. The writing style of this second edition can only be described as amateurish. This, fortunately, can be a little easier to swallow if you accept the spirit of the book (in Wrox's words 'Programmer to Programmer'). Take the text as quickly put-together material from programmers that have been through it (even if it was brief or only in school) and you should be fine.
Many unnecessary forward references exist throughout the text and, because of the unusually large number of authors, there is a large amount of repetition in the body of most chapters. The book's page count could also have been greatly reduced had the authors not consistently given condensed introduction to material that ends up being the subject matter for entire chapters later in the book. For example, two early chapters describe the basics of Tag Libraries, only to have them surface as the primary topic of chapters 8 - 11.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By jackofsometrades on June 6, 2001
Format: Paperback
When I needed to learn JSP (I got a job to build some serious custom tag libraries) my first stop was the Core series. I liked the Core Java 2 books. At first I liked the Core JSP books too, they are quick to read and easy to understand.
But then after some weeks working on real projects I noticed that they lacked very much essential information. I found myself searching through the office copy of Professional JSP 1st edition again and again to get the job done.
This 2nd edition is even better. If you are a decent programmer (not a complete beginner who's better of with some dummies books) and want to get the job done - this is the choice. The book relies heavily on examples. Several case studies with all the code implemented.
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