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99 of 103 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best intermediate level JSP books on the market
This books lives up to its title in that it provides both real-world JSP techniques (through 7 very informative case studies chapters), as well as JSP background information that serves as a quick start guide. I rank it as one of the top 2 JSP books currently available (the other one is Web Development With JavaServer Pages by Messrs. Fields and Kolb).
After the...
Published on June 8, 2000 by Eric L. Ma

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30 of 34 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good guide to JSP, overlaps with other Wrox titles though
For developers involved with web-based projects, whether it be an online store for electronic commerce or an Intranet site for accessing and modifying company data, the powerful blend of JavaServer Pages (JSP) and Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) technologies can really make life simple. Once you've mastered them, creating new components that encapsulate business logic, or...
Published on July 24, 2000 by David Reilly


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99 of 103 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best intermediate level JSP books on the market, June 8, 2000
This books lives up to its title in that it provides both real-world JSP techniques (through 7 very informative case studies chapters), as well as JSP background information that serves as a quick start guide. I rank it as one of the top 2 JSP books currently available (the other one is Web Development With JavaServer Pages by Messrs. Fields and Kolb).
After the JSP fundamentals are out of the way (which I am sure any JSP newcomer will appreciate and can benefit from), the book picks up pace with discussion on JDBC connection pooling, and the best practice for data access from JSP. Then comes the chapter on custom tags. My favorite chapters are the ones on debugging JSP's and implementing the MVC design pattern in JSP/servlets.
The case studies are very comprehensive and closely correlated to the earlier chapters. In one case study the design methodology is clearly explained with UML diagrams, which are very helpful to someone who is currently architecting an enterprise Java Web application. Other case studies cover such a wide area of topics such as JSP in combination with LDAP, EJB, XSL, and WAP.
For ASP developers, this books has two enormously useful chapters to get them started on JSP right away. One is a case study showing how to port an ASP app to JSP, and the other compares and contrasts the object model and syntax between ASP and JSP.
Having said all the above, this book does suffer from certain weaknesses. One is typical of any multi-author book, i.e., repeat of the same topic in different chapters. This is the case with JDBC, which shows up in both chapters 4 and 7. Another problem is the lack of the use of a standard servlet/JSP container, which will help new users to run all samples under the same software setting (although there is an appendix on setting up Tomcat server). Finally, a few chapters seem to be out of place in term of the logic flow of concept, such as the ones on dynamic GUI's and JNDI.
Finally, this book is still thin on heavy-duty J2EE topics, such as EJB, distributed transactions, message service, and interoperability with CORBA. This is why I consider it as an intermediate level book, not an advanced one. Hopefully we will see another Wrox book in the near future that addresses some of these issues.
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30 of 34 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good guide to JSP, overlaps with other Wrox titles though, July 24, 2000
By 
David Reilly (Gold Coast, Queensland Australia) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
For developers involved with web-based projects, whether it be an online store for electronic commerce or an Intranet site for accessing and modifying company data, the powerful blend of JavaServer Pages (JSP) and Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB) technologies can really make life simple. Once you've mastered them, creating new components that encapsulate business logic, or new web interfaces to existing systems, is easy. The trick, for developers, is mastering the technologies.
Professional JSP is one way to get up to speed. Like many of the books published by Wrox Press, Professional JSP covers a specific technology in-depth, as well as the various ancillary topics relating to it such as databases, servlets, and XML. While not every developer will need every web technology covered by the book (and there are many), the book works both as a tutorial to cover the basics and a reference for technologies that you may encounter later.
Professional JSP starts by covering the basics of Java Server Pages, and how they relate to other web technologies. Embedded in HTML pages, JSP provides an easy mechanism for creating interactive web interfaces that draws on server-side components, known as Enterprise JavaBeans. While the presentation logic is written in JSP, the processing occurs within these JavaBean components. The book takes a balanced approach, covering both JSP and its syntax, as well as how to write and interact with JavaBeans to perform useful tasks, like accessing databases through JDBC and using other Java technologies. However, if you've read other Wrox titles, you may find there is some overlap in the topics covered.
One of the nice things about Professional JSP is that, in addition to covering theory, it goes further and examines practical applications of JSP, and issues for programmers like security and debugging. Like other titles in the Professional series, there are case studies of real projects using JSP and related technologies. My favorite would have to be the case study on porting Active Server Pages to JSP -- something that is extremely important for developers with "legacy" web systems. On the whole, Professional JSP is an excellent book for web developers wanting to get up to speed with Java Server Pages, web development, and Enterprise JavaBeans. However, developers with less of a web presentation focus and more of back-end server view may also want to consider the excellent Professional Java Server Programming title, which also covers JSP. -- David Reilly, reviewed for the Java Coffee Break
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book for professionals!, September 4, 2000
By A Customer
This is a book for programmers who have a solid background in servlets programming and some experience in JSP. For beginners and for people who wish to learn those techniques on a standalone machine, they will be better off with Hall's "core servlets & JSP" or Fields&Kolb's "web development & JSP".
The book consists of 20 chapters. The first 12 chapters discuss the various salient aspects of JSP and the rest ( about two third of the whole book) is devoted to case studies.
A. THE BOOK'S STRENGTH:
By adopting Tomcat as its main testing software, the editors of "Professional JSP" have assured that most of the code examples will work. This is a big improvement over the past wrox books.
There are some excellent chapters in the first part. The discussion on session tracking is a real gem although the author failed to make a showcase of the code examples. The chapter on JSP Architecture contains some of the clearest explaination on the techniques of redirecting, forwarding and requestdispatcher. The chapter on customtags is equally very well done. But my favorite is the chapter on Global Settings, the idea is so practical. I also like the idea of emphasizing the importance of authentication which showed in many chapters of the book.
The case studies will serve as an excellent reference. Its coverage ranges from (1) the front end of an insurance company (2) a good pictures website which use JSP to publish its data (3) Security with JNDI (4) a online store using LDAP and JSP (5) J@EE, EIBs and Customtags (6) Multimedia and JSP (7) Weather website with JSP, XSLT and WAP (8) Porting ASP to JSP.
2. BOOK'S WEAKNESS:
The book is a combined effort of many authours and its unevenness showed. The first three chapters to introduce to JSP are out of place and a real waste. The chapter on Dynamic GUIs is a great idea which turned into a joke: after showing the general diea how to do it, the author sent readers to his website to learn the rest(?). And the chapter on JDBC connectivity and Pooling is a big disappointment: most of the chapter devoted to get connection, create databse,editing it and make query; and the rest the author explained how to use his own pool manager package, PoolMan. This wouldn't be too bad if PoolMan worked, with Tomcat.
The richness of the case studies is also its weakness. Unless you are experienced and have the facilities, you can't test them all. These techniques become obsolete pretty quick.
Probably the strongest objection to the book is its price. Buy it for your company and share with your colleague.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Your first JSP project?, August 3, 2000
By 
Robert James Braid (Sherman Oaks, CA, United States) - See all my reviews
If you are about to embark on your first JSP/EJB project then I really recommend this book.
I am an experienced Java Applet programmer but was limited in html, JSP and EJB skills. The book took me through everything I needed to know and got me up to speed very rapidly.
The book teaches JSP but it also explains the many different design approaches and gives examples of their use in real scenarios. This gives the developer the knowledge that is usually only acquired after many different projects.
I keep this book as a JSP bible now, after downloading the examples I also have a library of working code examples that kick started my project.
The main thing is that I really don't need the book anymore because it explained everything so well that the knowledge really sunk in.
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18 of 23 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Excellent tittle that DOESN'T live to the expectations!, July 16, 2000
After reading the reviews on this book I thought WOW! this has to be a great book and since I am an avid reader of computer books and I am currently working with server-side technologies I thought it would be a great investment. I wish I could say that now.
- The book lacks organization in terms of laying out information for readers that already know JAVA but want to learn JSP quickly.
- The code in the chapters has at least 80% of code errors (including syntax errors, missing code, and misplaced code). And upon complaining to the authors about this fact their answer was: "Download the code from our web-site and compile our code". What's the point of printing a book with lots and lots of code if that code is bogus!
- The code is not line numbered making it difficult to follow the discussion while reading.
- There is absolutely no information on how to install and configure at least one server to run the examples. So, if you aren't already running your own server forget it!
Finally I think this book could have been fun to read (as other books from WROX) if it weren't for the excessive problems I encountered while exploring the book making it difficult to enjoy the experience.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No 1 Book of JSP Techniques, July 16, 2000
This book covers the chapters in a very structured way. It starts with a concise description of the JSP Basics with a detailed explanation of the concepts. It explains all the concepts in a very clear and simple words supported by an equally clear Comments and examples. Any body with a little of Java experience can become very familiar with the JSP syntax and concepts by reading first few chapters. It covers all the necessary JSP syntax for building a small web application to a very large distributed Application. It also explains about the way the JSP pages are processed by different web servers. For example it explains about the various methods available to maintain a persistence session and their merits and demerits. This is the first book in JSP series that explains not only the concepts of JSP and how effectively one can use them with the help of this book. It also covers various other topics like EJB, JNDI, JDBC, XML, XSLT and WML in very detailed way. Overall I feel this is the greatest JSP book ever published so far. I could build a simple and robust JSP Web application by reading the first few chapters in a short period of time.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars I will not recommand, September 17, 2000
By 
"wsindhi" (Toronto Canada) - See all my reviews
Wrox has published some very good books on Java and web development,this book is not one of them.Though the authors have tried to cover everything related with JSP , the explanations about different topics are not very clear,very important topics like Cookies , session tracking etc have not given as much importnace as they deserve.There are some very good books available in the market like "Core Servlets and JavaServer Pages (JSP)" and "Web Development with Java Server Pages ", I would definitly prefer these books.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Trash Publishing - This Book Deserves 0 Stars, July 23, 2000
By 
Just as nine women cannot make a baby in one month, books such as this--written by committee--cannot possibly be well-written or coherent.
This book is nearly 900 pages of horrible writing whose useful information could be recast into a well-written book of about 300 pages. For ample proof, check out the first 10-15 pages of chapter 15, which is mindless fluff written in a hurry. For example, here's what you'll learn about "physical security" on page 459:
"The first step is to make sure that your machine(s) are physically secure. What this means is to physically protect the hardware and personnel that contain [sic] or run your machines. This can range from locks on your doors to armed guards or to James Bond-like biometric locks.
... [vapid paragraph mercifully omitted]
When you think about physical security don't forget about laptops and palmtops. These machines are often the hardest to secure, and yet contain some of the most sensitive data about your organization. Passwords, social engineering information (such as information someone can use to fake their way past secretaries, etc.), or confidential plans may all be stored on those hard drives. A nefarious person or organization might use this data to break into your organization, to hatch their own plans based on your designs, improve their own product so they're much better than your weak points or may just use this information as a tool for bribery."
And here I thought this was a book about JavaServer Pages, not a manual for idiots about securing machinery. Silly me.
Before you click that Add to Shopping Cart button, take a long hard look at the quote above. At least half of this book is similar mindless drivel. Just say no to greedy publishers that round up a crew of programmers to rush a so-called book to market in order to get their grubby hands on your money.
Remember, this book is authored by (no less than) 16 programmers. Would you hire 16 auto mechanics to lay the foundation of your new house? The programmers that wrote this book should leave writing to real authors.
Whatever you do, don't forget to physically secure your laptops and palmtops.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The only definitive reference for JSP, July 10, 2000
By 
JM (Sunnyvale , CA, USA) - See all my reviews
Wonderful stuff . Go for it . Covers the fundamental JSP concepts in great detail. Useful and clear cope snippets to makes the point even clearer. The initial chapters cover just the JSP concepts and the basic syntax. Tag libraries are covered in great detail. JNDI , JDBC , LDAP and XML interaction with JSP is covered and handled very well.
The real strong point for the book is the case studies provided . The cases are real time scenarios and cover most of the J2EE technologies in context to JSP. This will be really useful for less experienced programmers. There are six or so case studies in all.
The Servlet API documentation could have been avoided. In all, a real wonderful book
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Too wordy - hard to understand, January 25, 2001
By A Customer
I didn't like this book. The examples are hard to follow. Also, it assumes you want to use other technologies like Servlets in conjunction of your JSP pages, which I'm not. API is not organized very well and hard to find things fast. I hope my O'Reilly (on order) is better...
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