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ProfitBrand: How to Increase the Profitability, Accountability and Sustainability of Brands Hardcover – September 1, 2005


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Kogan Page Business Books (September 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0749444657
  • ISBN-13: 978-0749444655
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 5.8 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,884,414 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"...finely structured...presents compelling arguments engaging...thought-provoking." -- BrandRepublic

"...the freshest view of brands comes from Profit Brand, which attacks the oldest questions about marketing: accountability and profitability" -- Strategy & Business

"Finally, a strategic view of brands and branding." -- Donald E. Schultz, Professor of Integrated Marketing Communications, Kellogg School of Management

"Nick Wreden's ideas are theses nailed to the church doors of conventional branding." -- Nick Morgan, Editor, Harvard Business School Press

"ProfitBrand does a superb job in showing how companies can gain by tracking individual customers' profitability..." -- Philip Kotler, Kellogg School of Management

"to be successful every person in your company must be thinking about branding and customer loyalty...innovative and straightforward." -- Kirkus Reviews

From the Publisher

Voted one of Strategy & Business's "Best Business Books 2005"

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Steven J. Pipe on November 17, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Nick Wreden offers an exhaustively researched but very engaging book on branding that goes a step beyond the traditional books of this kind. Rather than just rehashing what most business professionals already know about the importance of building a strong brand, Wreden explores how businesses can place more measurement and accountability to their branding efforts. He brings in groups you may not have thought about before, such as supply chain and manufacturing organizations, and how they also play a key role in strengthening a brand...with an excellent example of how K-Mart failed to leverage its supply chain capabilities. This is a must-read for not only marketing, PR, sales and financial managers, but also others in the organization who have a stake in the brand. Wreden shows just how many stakeholders can help build the brand.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Marcus Osborne on February 27, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Why do up to 80% of products fail to become brands despite the US$1.5 billion spent on marketing annually? A primary reason is that companies are still following the `immutable laws' of the post-war mass economy when competition was limited, media conduits to consumers were few, and leisure pursuits were confined to visiting the cinema, a bowling alley or a night market.

During the time from 1945-1995, few leisure distractions meant traditional marketing strategies -- such as TV, print and outdoor advertising -- were enough to build a brand. As recently as the 1970's, many Asian capitals only had one or two TV channels, few billboards and a handful of domestic magazines, it was easy to reach consumers.

But today's buyers are overwhelmed with data, information and choices. For instance, Malaysian households receive up to 100 TV channels, 24 hours a day. Supermarkets carry 5,000 to 10,000 SKUs; the number of titles distributed by the average magazine wholesaler has more than quadrupled in 10 years; there are more than 20 commercial radio stations broadcasting up to 20 minutes of commercials every hour; and billboards jostle for attention at every junction. Such a barrage of messages does not include more than 40 billion web pages and 20 million blogs on the Internet. How can a consumer's mind process so much data? Obviously it can't. In fact it shuts much of it out which accounts for the high failure rate.

Many new products also fail to become brands because companies focus on customer acquisition, not retention. Most companies invest the largest chunk of their marketing budgets on acquisition strategies.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Khaled Mahmoud Al Anani on November 11, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I read ProfitBrand as part of an efort of familiarizing myself with branding methods and procedures before hiring a marketing company to outsource all marketing activities to. ProfitBrand was particularly helpful for many reasons. First of all the book starts clearly by giving a little bit of background on branding methods in different 'ages' where branding was known. This served to show how until today many companies still use outdated techniques to promote their brand whereas there are much more effective methods today.

The second strength of this book is that it clearly outlines multiple methods for measuring the effectiveness of the branding process. This is the distinguishing factor of this book: it promotes accountability through empirical measurement in order to help management accurately measure the performance of the branding effort

The third point is that the book focuses on how to leverage the power of the brand to turn brand power into the ultimate measure of performance: profit; hence the title 'ProfitBrand'.

Overall the book is well-written, ideas are clearly laid out and the concept is quite enticing for anybody seeking to understand how to make the most out of their brand. I gave it 4 out of 5 not because of any particular fault with the book but because I reserve the 5/5 rating for only exceptional books such as Jack Welch's Winning and Jim Collins' Good to Great. I recommend this book as a second helping after reading a good introduction to the concept of branding such as 'Brand Simple'.
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By Rex Whisman on January 19, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I think this is simply the best, and most practical book on how to effectively evaluate a brand strategy. While there is a lot to digest, the information and recommendations are spot on. Get a copy!
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Format: Hardcover
I chanced upon Nick Wreden's "ProfitBrand" due to these interesting terms on this brand book cover - `profitability, accountability and sustainability'. This book, which uses metrics-based approach to branding, is a must read book for every organization that's looking at how branding investment can be measured. Nick's belief in "experiential experience" is so spot on in today's competitive world. "ProfitBrand's" examples on how to measure the "profitability of each customer" should in fact be one of the key analyses for any business. Well written with impressive international examples, "ProfitBrand" deals with issues many branding books don't touch, like pricing. It even gives a devastating critique of positioning theory. Nick's "ProfitBrand" should be read by CEOs and even entrepreneurs and not just those with marketing or branding responsibilities.
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