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44 of 44 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good overview
This is a good overview of the suite of services that comprise Amazon Web Services (AWS), I'd have given it a 3.5 star rating if I could. It talks about all of them, but it spends the bulk of its time, very reasonably, discussing S3 (the persistent storage system) and EC2 (the compute cloud - basically Amazon's Rackspace in the clouds) - each getting about 100 pages...
Published on May 17, 2008 by Felix Sheng

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23 of 36 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars disappointment... but you may find some help
Well.. I have pre-ordered that book back in Feb and was very anxious to get it. I read it cover to cover and could not find any how-tos, migration paths, implementation ideas, etc.. AWS is a new concept so many IT Directors and sysasdmins who have previously deployed "three tier" structure (DB - MiddleLayer - Web server) are desperate to find how to migrate your typical...
Published on April 10, 2008 by Konstantin Kondakov


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44 of 44 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good overview, May 17, 2008
This review is from: Programming Amazon Web Services: S3, EC2, SQS, FPS, and SimpleDB (Paperback)
This is a good overview of the suite of services that comprise Amazon Web Services (AWS), I'd have given it a 3.5 star rating if I could. It talks about all of them, but it spends the bulk of its time, very reasonably, discussing S3 (the persistent storage system) and EC2 (the compute cloud - basically Amazon's Rackspace in the clouds) - each getting about 100 pages devoted to it.

As others have noted it is out of date - but any book would have the same problem due to the moving target that AWS is. The biggest news is that EC2 is going to be getting persistent storage, which I believe will change the game completely when it is rolled out to the public. Instead of needing some elaborate connection with S3, now instances will behave much more like a typical physical machine with real disk drive. The book, on the other hand, provides almost no real advice on how to deal with the problem of non-persistence of EC2's current storage mechanism. This is a signifcant problem that everyone will have to deal with and glossing over it is a failing of the book.

This is also a Ruby book, which I found fairly annoying. Nowhere in the description does it suggest that it is done in Ruby. And while Ruby certainly is trendy these days, the actual number of Ruby developers is small - it gets undue weight in computer texts. At the end of the day, though, it generally provides the actual request strings and XML requests and responses for non-ruby folk to come to their own conclusions.

This is a worthwhile book to get if you're interested in quickly getting a good and broad idea on how to work with AWS. It will give a good foundation to get more out of the documentation and forums found on Amazon's AWS site itself.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Resource For Working With Amazon Web Services, June 10, 2008
By 
Dan McKinnon (Tewksbury, MA USA) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Programming Amazon Web Services: S3, EC2, SQS, FPS, and SimpleDB (Paperback)
'Programming Amazon Web Services: S3, EC2, SQS, FPS, and SimpleDB' is a good resource for anyone that is using the Amazon suite of web products and need to learn more about how to get the most out of these powerful set of web 2.0 tools.

For anyone that doesn't know what these tools are, here's a quick one-liner about each:

S3 - online storage to store and retrieve data

EC2 - online computing to be able to run jobs on a farm of machines

SQS - web messaging infrastructure for computer-computer communication

FPS - flexible payment system for moving money online

SimpleDB - store and retrieve datasets online

I like the content of this book and feel that it plays an important part in this niche market but my major qualm is that the code is written solely in Ruby in this book. While that might appeal to a certain market, to only have this communication in Ruby and/or not use a more traditional language of the day I feel is a major mistake. For this reason alone I knock a star off but still recommend it to anyone looking to learn or use these incredibly cool technologies provided by amazon.

**** RECOMMENDED
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, except for cover typo!, July 2, 2008
This review is from: Programming Amazon Web Services: S3, EC2, SQS, FPS, and SimpleDB (Paperback)
Excellent resource, but a bit droll. The content is laid out well, there are plenty of (working) examples, and there's pretty much no fluff to the book at all (in contrast to many O'Reilly books which add a fair amount of humor and distraction).
My chief worry when I received the book was that the title on the spine said "Programming Amazon Web Servcies [sic]". Yes, really the spine has a typo! The cover page does *not* have the typo. Obviously I was worried that the content might have similar brazen errors. But so far not so.
I'd recommend this book for anyone who needs an EC2/S3/AWS reference.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Book - Seems A Little Rushed Though, May 11, 2008
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Programming Amazon Web Services: S3, EC2, SQS, FPS, and SimpleDB (Paperback)
I'd have rated this a 4.5 if I could have.

This is an excellent book covering a very new subject matter. My only major complaint is that it seems a little rushed - I've found several typos, and even one section where a couple of lines of (important for that section) code are missing. (I figured out what was missing as I'm sure most people will.)

Also, the book is out of date. However, that is not the fault of the author or the publisher! It is that Amazon's service changes so quickly. The author and the publisher have made every attempt to mention the most recent changes to the service as of the time of writing, including pointing to places on the web to find out more information.

The material it covers is spot on. It goes through the different services that Amazon offers - including their storage, elastic computing, payment systems, and database systems. It clearly explains the disadvantages and advantages of each system, and provides -useful- code examples (in ruby) of how one can take advantage of the services Amazon provides. (There are examples in other languages, like Python, that the author makes available on the book's website.) Each section is devoted to a service for the most part, and the book is very readable.

As I said, I'd have rated this book a 4.5 if I could have. Outside of the errors due to rushing, it's quite useful and quite informative. The code is easy to follow, and I've found it very handy for working with the Amazon Web Services.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very good Introduction and Overview of AWS EC2, July 1, 2012
This review is from: Programming Amazon Web Services: S3, EC2, SQS, FPS, and SimpleDB (Paperback)
The title of this book is misleading as I didn't find it to be a book about programming AWS. The books was a very good introduction to AWS and services/offerings from AWS including RDS, EC2, S3, SimpleDB, SQS and more. The book had very good high level information and some details on all these services. It could have gone into more detail on the architecture behind each of these services. I found the book went from very high level to detailed code without any explanation or reason for jumping into detailed code. That being said (having co-authored 4 books and knowing the effort that goes into a book) I found the book useful. I would only recommend this book to people that are new to AWS.
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7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Pretty good book, April 4, 2008
This review is from: Programming Amazon Web Services: S3, EC2, SQS, FPS, and SimpleDB (Paperback)
I am reading this book on Safari, where it appeared before the hard copy was available. It also avoided snail mail, and this allowed me to be the first reviewer.

The book is about one of the hottest offerings in the software and surely will be read by many people, if only because it is the first book on this subject. It goes through detailed examples and explains the code. You could, potentially, get most of the same information from the tutorials, excepting maybe the bugs and workarounds which are not for the polished company publications.

My only wish is that the examples were not written in Ruby, which today ranks 10th on the TIOBE rating. The explanation that "it is easy to read" seems weak. I would venture to say the author felt more comfortable in Ruby. The upshot was that I learned to read a new language and found out about some new techniques that are cross-language, such as XPath.

I would recommend this book if only because reading it will make you feel more cozy with AWS, before you go to the tutorials and code samples.

Chapter 3 is a good overview of pros and cons of AWS, which you can show to your management if they are uncomfortable with the cloud.

And good luck on the cloud adventure.
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23 of 36 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars disappointment... but you may find some help, April 10, 2008
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Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Programming Amazon Web Services: S3, EC2, SQS, FPS, and SimpleDB (Paperback)
Well.. I have pre-ordered that book back in Feb and was very anxious to get it. I read it cover to cover and could not find any how-tos, migration paths, implementation ideas, etc.. AWS is a new concept so many IT Directors and sysasdmins who have previously deployed "three tier" structure (DB - MiddleLayer - Web server) are desperate to find how to migrate your typical "data center" / "managed service" / "colocation" into Amazon web cloud (EC2 /S3)- besides lots of Ruby examples that book has little to offer: no structure, no migration. Bottom line: if you want to start fresh and "play" with AWS -this one is for you, if you manage 4 or 5 or 20 data centers and concern about how many servers do you really need and how to move your high availability application to Amazon - you need to look elsewhere.
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5 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A lot of Ruby, November 10, 2008
This review is from: Programming Amazon Web Services: S3, EC2, SQS, FPS, and SimpleDB (Paperback)
As mentioned in other reviews of this book, there are a lot of Ruby examples. If this book were completely written using Java or C#, this would have been a 4-5 star book. If nothing else, include examples with other languages as well.
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4 of 20 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Security concern, January 12, 2010
By 
Peter M. Abraham "Peter M. Abraham" (Lancaster County, Pennsylvania) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Programming Amazon Web Services: S3, EC2, SQS, FPS, and SimpleDB (Paperback)
I almost purchased this book as we've been using Amazon AWS more and more. Aside from lacking perl and PHP examples, what concerned me the most is that forms are used as examples in Amazon.com's text. Forms that include information for which google indexes, and forms that use hidden fields (which are not so hidden) to pass information which hackers can also use. In today's age of cyber warfare, I don't recommend any method which includes plain text key information.
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Programming Amazon Web Services: S3, EC2, SQS, FPS, and SimpleDB
Programming Amazon Web Services: S3, EC2, SQS, FPS, and SimpleDB by James Murty (Paperback - April 4, 2008)
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