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Programming Android Paperback – August 8, 2011

ISBN-13: 978-1449389697 ISBN-10: 1449389694 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 504 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (August 8, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1449389694
  • ISBN-13: 978-1449389697
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 7 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #627,188 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Author

We set out to write a book that goes beyond the basics - that doesn't just tell you "what" but also "why" and how best to make use of your knowledge to create rich, compelling Android apps.
This book at aimed at people with some programming experience. It will tell you how to turn your knowledge of Java, iOS programming, and other experience into productive results in Android.
Android is new and different, and the best Android software takes advantage of how Android enables you to store data, communicate between processes and applications, and how Android applications interact with the Android operating system. This book will help you build those advantages into your apps.

From the Inside Flap

"Finally! A book that goes into deail! Hooray!" -Perry J. Nally, FeetDog.com
"Great work... couldn't put it down" -Wenjing Dai, developer

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Customer Reviews

It wouldn't be difficult to break that code out.
Broadmeadow
This book explains amazingly well how a single-threaded UI framework works in very good detail.
Tanya Yordanova Penkovska
Even experienced developers may learn a thing or two, if they go through this book.
VJ

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 38 people found the following review helpful By Jason Geng on December 16, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have bought dozen of IT books from O'Reilly and never got disappointed until I got this one. The authors try to cover everything but turn out covering nothing deep enough to be helpful in practice.

Taking Chapter 10 "Handling and Persisting Data" for example, the book first comes with an overview of relational database, which is good. Then it comes to a piece of code introducing SQLiteOpenHelper, a key component for handling Android data persistence. Just when I am expecting a section to continue on how to actually use this SQLiteOpenHelper to do real work, it stops there suddenly and comes out with another totally unrelated social networking code. I really can't see the point why it's composed in this way.

Similar things happen for other chapters. I am doing an Android project right now. In the beginning, when I needed to understand a specific technical usage, my first action was to reference this book (from reliable Oreilly). More often than not it failed to satisfy me. Android Documentation site and StackOverflow become the only way that can answer my question.

My overall opinion is that the book failed to handle a large and diverse topic like Android programming. Not recommended.
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29 of 31 people found the following review helpful By eric j larson on August 11, 2011
Format: Paperback
I had a need for using Android in a research setting for advanced
mobile networking. Though I have a strong Java and mobile programming
background, I have no familiarity with Android. I needed to get up
to speed quickly, and thought I would go with an OReilly book, usually
a good bet.

I ended up using the intro to quickly
get started with eclipse, and then moved into the view section to put
together an interface without much trouble (useful examples),
and am looking at the
advanced sections to learn about Android's NFC feature. The 3rd
section is enlightening, saving me from some design mistakes that I was
sure to make. I did, however, feel that some of the information in the
later chapters was over
my head, targeted at an audience with more outside knowledge.

Overall, the book is both good at introducing the basics of Android,
and covering the more advanced topics.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A. Jaokar on August 8, 2011
Format: Paperback
This book goes past the basics and provides a deeper level of understading of every topic it touches. It has a particular focus on how Android's data archiecture provides a model for apps that use a Web service, improving apperent
performance and presentation of data.

It is also the first in-depth book to cover Fragment and related classes that go into making Android tablet user interfaces. Additionally, it covers the compatibility library that enables running Fragment-based UIs on pre-Honeycomb versions of Android.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By VJ on August 17, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have been waiting for a while for a book like this for Android Technology. I have been doing general programming for several years. I found this book very educational and here are a few sections in the book that really stood out:

Chapter 7 of the book titled "Building a View" provides an excellent understanding on how the "views" in Android work. The explanation by the authors, using diagrams showing how the traditional model view controller architecture comes together in Android is very educational. I have been waiting for a good tutorial along these lines for some time.

Chapter 12 and 13 deal with content providers. The extensive treatment of content providers with example code and a sample application provided me several new insights in how this technology works, and how it can be used in real programming situations. The content provider framework for storing and referencing data using URIs is one of the novel features of the Android operating system. Great work in explaining the technology step by step!

The discussion on 2D and 3D graphics is also very informative. I learned a lot from this book. I would highly recommend this book to any developer or any Android Project Manager. Even experienced developers may learn a thing or two, if they go through this book. An excellent book, on Android.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Tom Borthwick on December 18, 2011
Format: Paperback
Programming Android provides a good, comprehensive view of Android application architecture, but for someone already familiar with java, it starts slowly...reeeeeeeeaallly slowly. There are sections on installation of the Android SDK, basic concepts of standard java (like its type system), a long introduction to Eclipse...even a section on the preferred location to store java source code.

To be fair, the book proclaims at the very beginning that it's written for people of all backgrounds, not just java, and it's got to cover the basics for those who might, say, know iOS but not server-side java. But for me, the book didn't really get interesting until it launched into a detailed description of concurrency and serialization on Android. From there, it kept going at a fast clip all the way into advanced topics, like NFC, sensors, and audio and video.

Layout, which some Android references get bogged down in, is explained conceptually in the context of MVC architecture. The book doesn't spend time introducing all the standard view classes or going through their properties. You'll find a good description of how Android measures and arranges UI components, but you won't find simplistic code examples for the onMeasure() method.

The book goes through the Android framework and advocates how it thinks a non-trivial app should be organized. It keeps mobile issues like battery life, connectivity, and asynchronicity in the forefront of all its discussions, and it provides extended examples on things like how to write your own content provider and how to incorporate Google maps.

Programming Android is really not for beginners. If you want simple code examples to get up to speed on basic concepts, you're better off starting with the online dev guide and other resources.
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