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Programming Windows Azure Paperback – May 24, 2010

ISBN-13: 978-0596801977 ISBN-10: 0596801971 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 370 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (May 24, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0596801971
  • ISBN-13: 978-0596801977
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 0.9 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #800,113 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Book Description

Programming the Microsoft Cloud

About the Author

Sriram Krishnan works on the Windows Azure program management team. He has been involved with the product since before its public launch andhas worked on several of the features covered in this book. Previously,Sriram has worked on several Microsoft products, ranging from Web 2.0sites to developer tools. Sriram is a frequent speaker at Microsoftevents and blogs at http://www.sriramkrishnan.com.


More About the Author

Sriram Krishnan is an entrepreneur currently living in San Francisco. He has run product teams at Yahoo and Microsoft. He has appeared on Bloomberg, the New York Times and has contributed to publications like Forbes and BusinessInsider. He is a prolific speaker and has delivered talks at several conferences.

You can find him online at sriramk.com and on twitter at @sriramk.

Customer Reviews

Highly recommend on this subject.
Pavel
Even more important, every code example is explained in a concise and down-to-earth way.
Sten Sundblad
I can't stress enough how disappointed I am with this book.
Arash Emami

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

50 of 58 people found the following review helpful By Craig McMurtry on July 21, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The author does little more than recap information that is readily available in the SDK documentation, and has added hardly any thought about the practicalities of Azure development. (In fact, I could find NO evidence of such thought, but I've written "hardly any," in case I missed an iota.) For example, if you want to use an Azure Worker Role, you might create one from the template provided by the Azure SDK add-in to Microsoft Visual Studio. You will peruse the automatically-generated code and think to yourself, perhaps, "okay: what are the implications of the different alternatives for sleeping on the thread in the Run() method." You won't find that question or any others answered in Krishnan's book, though. What you will find is text that simply restates what you will read in the generated template. So save yourself $49.99 and just download the SDK and read the templates. Perhaps you want to use SQL Azure in your solution? The author devotes 9 pages to that subject. Here are a couple of things you might want to do if you actually want to use SQL Azure:

(1) Take a definition of an existing database and deploy that into Azure. There is nothing at all on how one might accomplish that ... not so much as a hand-wave in the direction of the Visual Studio Database Edition facilities that would allow you to generate a complete definition of your database for deployment to SQL Azure.

(2) Connect to a SQL Azure database from an Azure Web or Worker role. Krishnan has a code snippet showing how to accomplish that (which one could have found in the Azure SDK documentation easily enough) but not a word about how one might not HARD CODE the connection parameters, but instead get them from configuration, and, in that case, how best to secure the configuration information.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Greg Boyd on March 9, 2011
Format: Paperback
I do not envy anyone charged with writing this book---particularly for publication in 2010. Mr. Krishnan is unquestionably comfortable with the subject of Windows Azure, but the truth is that as of March 2011, much of the detailed advice in this book is hopelessly out of date. That says more about the speed and timing of Microsoft's portal design-changes and releases of new SDKs than it does about the author, but the simple fact is that much of the actual advice here leads to confusion and failed efforts.

Just a few examples:
--CSPack command-line tool examples failed with errors having nothing to do with environment paths, etc.
--Names of seminal tools have changed: Development Fabric (DevFabric) is now Compute Emulator; Development Storage is now known as Storage Emulator.
--The MS Azure Development Portal has radically changed both in terms of look and feel and in its usage.

In short, look for Azure books published in 2011 or later. The concepts are difficult enough, without having to create your own glossary to translate obsolete names of important tools.

Hopefully, Mr. Krishnan has a 2nd edition coming out soon.
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Format: Paperback
I'm just starting on programming services in Windows Azure, and this book really helped me make sense of the various options I have in doing so, as well as how they relate to concepts I already know in the CLR and .NET. I really appreciated the narrative flow of the book: it was laid out the way that I think about building a service, not as a textbook as so many books in this genre are. The sections on Windows Azure storage, in particular, made reading through the documentation on MSDN much more meaningful; the descriptions of the motivations, from a programmer's perspective, of the available options were much appreciated.

On the con side, if you're looking for a book that lays out common architectures for distributed systems and how they might be implemented in Azure, this isn't the book. There are two or three complete examples, only one of which is a common patterns for services. The discussion of queues in particular seemed abbreviated, since they are such a key ingredient of distributed systems.

All told, though, I am very happy I purchased this book; I've already referred back to it several times in prototyping and expect to do so again.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Franck Jeannin on June 17, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
When a new technology is released (especially something as visible as Microsoft Azure) lots of publishers (and authors) jump on the bandwagon thinking that timing is what really matters and quality is... well, a nice to have.
If you fear that Programming Windows Azure is one of those books, stop worrying. Not only the quality is definitively there but you also get lots of inside information on the genesis of Azure that shows that the author was involved in the project from the very beginning.
Granted, you don't absolutely need to know why some design decisions were made in order to program for Azure but it helps you get the big picture which in turn will make you a better Architect.
So, if you want to learn about Azure and be able to write your first Azure application within a few hours or if you want to know why there is a dog on the book cover or why traffic lights don't work in India, read this book!
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6 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Pavel on May 21, 2010
Format: Paperback
It took me 2 days to cover 70% of the book and to understand how things work. Descriptions are concise with lots of examples, you don't want to read copy of the MSDN on every method and possibility product has in 1000 pages biblia. You want read it, try it and start developing your products, that's what this book about. Highly recommend on this subject.
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