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Programming iOS 5: Fundamentals of iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch Development Paperback – April 1, 2012

ISBN-13: 978-1449319342 ISBN-10: 1449319343 Edition: Second Edition

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 1014 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; Second Edition edition (April 1, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1449319343
  • ISBN-13: 978-1449319342
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 1.9 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (34 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,285,311 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Matt Neuburg has a PhD in Classics and has taught at many universities and colleges. He has been programming computers since 1968. He has written applications for Mac OS X and iOS, is a former editor of MacTech Magazine, and is a long-standing contributing editor for TidBITS. His previous O'Reilly books are Frontier: The Definitive Guide, REALbasic: The Definitive Guide, and AppleScript: The Definitive Guide. He makes a living writing books, articles, and software documentation, as well as by programming, consulting, and training.


More About the Author

Matt Neuburg started programming computers in 1968, when he was 14 years old, as a member of a literally underground high school club, which met once a week to do time-sharing on a bank of PDP-10s by way of primitive Teletype machines. He also occasionally used Princeton University's IBM-360/67, but gave it up in frustration when one day he dropped his punch cards. He majored in Greek at Swarthmore College and received his Ph.D. from Cornell University in 1981, writing his doctoral dissertation (about Aeschylus) on a mainframe. He proceeded to teach classical languages, literature, and culture at many well-known institutions of higher learning, most of which now disavow knowledge of his existence, and to publish numerous scholarly articles unlikely to interest anyone. Meanwhile he obtained an Apple IIc and became hopelessly hooked on computers again, migrating to a Macintosh in 1990. He wrote some educational and utility freeware, became an early regular contributor to the online journal TidBITS, and in 1995 left academe to edit MacTech Magazine. In August 1996 he became a freelancer, which means he has been looking for work ever since.

He remains a contributing editor for TidBITS. He is the author of Programming iOS 4, AppleScript: The Definitive Guide, REALbasic: The Definitive Guide, and Frontier: The Definitive Guide, all from O'Reilly Media, Inc., and of several eBooks in the popular Take Control series. He has also written several online guides, such as his introduction to rb-appscript. He has taught in developer training programs such as the AppleScript Pro Sessions. He is the author of the online help for many prominent Mac applications, such as Script Debugger, Affrus, Opal, and MacSpeech Dictate. He has written such widely used Mac freeware as MemoryStick, NotLight, and Thucydides. He has created (and uses) his own open source Ruby-based Web site development framework, RubyFrontier. In 2007 he was voted by MacTech readers as one of the 25 most influential people in the Macintosh community. He has written several iPhone applications under his own name (search the iPhone app store under "Neuburg"), as well as the widely used TidBITS News, plus some additional applications created under contract that he isn't allowed to talk about.

Customer Reviews

The author's approach and writing style made it a pleasure to read.
T. Anderson
This is all stuff you can infer correctly if you've read (and completely absorbed) the previous chapters, but it makes the book a bit harder to read.
Joshua Davies
I would recommend this book to an advanced or beginner programmer looking to get their hands dirty with ios programming.
Isotope

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Joshua Davies VINE VOICE on August 14, 2012
Format: Paperback
iOS (iPhone OS) is Apple's unified operating system for its handheld/ mobile computing environments including the iPhone, iPad and the iPod touch. Matt Neuburg, the author of the O'Reilly "Programming iOS" series, has established himself as an expert in both the operating system and the large API set that supports it. His experience and authority shows throughout the book -- this is clearly somebody who's spent decades in his field and has some real, useful, hands-on experience to share. I learned iOS programming from this book's predecessor, "Programming iOS 4". Just about the time I finished reading that book, it was already out of date with Apple's iOS 5 having rolled out. Now that I'm finished reading this 1000+ page book, it, too, is out of date as Apple has announced iOS 6. I look forward to a new edition of Neuburg's book which I will pick up as soon as it becomes available.

Structurally, "Programming iOS 5" is similar to "Programming iOS 4". Both books are split into seven parts, but they really break down into three logical ones. The first section covers the Objective-C language that you must use to interface meaningfully with iOS. The second section covers the XCode IDE that virtually everybody uses to develop iOS programs, and the third, longest section of the book covers the actual iOS API set (he breaks this third section into five "parts" for publication symmetry, but these last five sections are far more related to one another than the first two).

Part I - Language

The first section is almost identical in both editions of the book. It's not a bad introduction to Objective-C; it starts with a refresher on the core C language (Objective-C can be seen as a competitor to C++ -- an object- oriented framework added to C).
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By mko on May 4, 2012
Format: Paperback
This book is simply a new release of "Programming iOS 4'. It contains lots of new information you won't find in previous release - mostly related to most recent changes in iOS 5. One of these features are story boards. Basically, whenever story boards are applicable, you will read how to apply them. ARC related memory management is another new feature, and, it is well described here. If you haven't used it yet you will learn how to work with ARC in both situations - when you develop old application and want to migrate to ARC and how to work with ARC in applications developed from the scratch. New concepts like @autoreleasepool blocks, weak references, retain cycles are also explained. Sections related to notifications, startup process and life time have improved. Comparing to previous edition, section "Swamped by Events" was rewritten and redesigned. In my opinion it is now easier to follow and easier to understand. The same refers to view controllers related part. Basically, the book targets recent XCode release and iOS 5 and addresses some composition/content related drawbacks you can find in previous release. Big plus goes for mentioning Instruments. However, this section is way too short. It covers only simple use-cases. Still, it's better than nothing.

When it comes to drawbacks. In my opinion there are two frameworks that are missing - CoreData and SQLite. You won't find anything about these in here. I think that book would be much better if it covered database storage related aspects. At least at introductory level.

If you own "Programming iOS 4' already, I'd skip this "upgrade". In case you haven't developed for iOS yet, this one is really good introduction to iOS development.
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14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By T. Anderson TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 12, 2012
Format: Paperback
A little background so you know what type of experience I have. I have been a Microsoft .NET architect and developer since the first beta release. Before that C, C++, ColdFusion, ASP, JavaScript and of course HTML. Being a .NET developer has many advantages, but the one major disadvantage we suffer has driven me to Java and Objective-C over the past year. That one disadvantage? Microsoft themselves. They come off as completely lost and have wreaked havoc on .NET developer community the past few years.

I have read several books on programming with Objective-C, but this is by far the most comprehensive and well put together. One book I would recommend to anyone coming from the .NET world is Migrating to iPhone and iPad for .NET Developers.

After advising the reader to brush up on their C by reading certain parts of C Programming Language, and then spending a chapter showing how C relates to Objective-C, the author has a really nice overview of Objective-C. The overview is Part I of the book and it is 5 chapters long. The chapters include Just Enough C, Object-Based Programming, Objective-C Objects and Messages, Objective-C Classes, and Objective-C Instances.

Part II IDE includes chapters on Anatomy of an Xcode Project, Nib Management, Documentation, and Life Cycle of a Project. In part II the author goes into detail about the architecture of the project and the files included in the project. He does a great job of explaining nibs, the coding environment, testing, debugging, and provides an overview of the steps taken when submitting your app to the app store. The author also points out and shows you how to take advantage of the Xcode documentation.

Part III is all about Cocoa.
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