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Programming iOS 4: Fundamentals of iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch Development Paperback – June 5, 2011

ISBN-13: 978-1449388430 ISBN-10: 1449388434 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 834 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (June 5, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1449388434
  • ISBN-13: 978-1449388430
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 2.5 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,163,300 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Matt Neuburg has a PhD in Classics and has taught at many universities and colleges. He has been programming computers since 1968. He has written applications for Mac OS X and iOS, is a former editor of MacTech Magazine, and is a long-standing contributing editor for TidBITS. His previous O'Reilly books are Frontier: The Definitive Guide, REALbasic: The Definitive Guide, and AppleScript: The Definitive Guide. He makes a living writing books, articles, and software documentation, as well as by programming, consulting, and training.

Customer Reviews

Very comprehensive, with the subject matter explained with extreme lucidity and competence.
An Amazon Customer
So with this in mind I ordered his iOS4 book - and after just a few days I can already say this is the book to get.
Dr. Markus Winter
This book on iOS 4 programming is a must-have for anyone who would be serious about learning iOS development.
Daniel Wong

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

34 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Ben Edwards on June 8, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book was a little late in getting published, so I tried a few other iOS programming books along the way. They were either lacking depth or left way too many of my questions unanswered. When I finally received this book and started to skim through it I was squealing like a schoolgirl. "Oh, that's how that works!" and "well why didn't the Apple documentation explain that!" It's all presented quite well and logically and with an appealing adult (but not at all dry) tone. It's also the only book I've seen so far that covers Xcode 4. Worth the wait, most definitely.

And even though this book says "Fundamentals of ...", if you just want to get in fast and start hacking iOS code you should probably look elsewhere---then come back to this book when you've gotten it out of your system and nothing works anymore and you're completely lost and confused.

-Ben
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By MA Reader on July 1, 2011
Format: Paperback
I've tried a couple of other iOS and Cocoa books before, but this is the one that actually taught me how to write apps for the iPhone and iPad.

Some other books try to take shortcuts by teaching you "only what you need to know to get an app up and running" and neglect basic concepts which are required to understand the copied-and-pasted samples. This book eschews that approach. The author takes the time to explain the fundamentals of Objective-C and Cocoa, gradually building up so that you are always confident that you understand what's going on. A good test for me of understanding a concept is whether I'm able to explain it to others. I found that while studying this book, after I finished each chapter, I could indeed explain what I learned to my collaborators.

This book is not only great for learning the basics of programming for iOS, it also goes into some detail about more advanced topics in the latter chapters.

I really can't say enough good things about this book. I managed to write my first (fairly sophisticated) iPhone app after reading it, and I had a great time doing so. Highly recommended.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Markus Winter on July 8, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The first book I bought from Matt Neuberg was "REALbasic - The Definitive Guide" (in 2002 I think). I bought every REALbasic book which ever came on the market, but even now (when the book is so outdated as to be Win3.1 to Windows 7 or MacOS 7 to MacOS X Lion) it is still by far the best book on REALbasic programming. Just imagine a book on MacOS 7 / Win3.1 programming which is so good that it is even now the best book on MacOS X Lion / Windows programming.

So with this in mind I ordered his iOS4 book - and after just a few days I can already say this is the book to get. Despite my high expectations I wasn't being disappointed - like his "REALbasic - TDG) this book is also a definitive guide. He doesn't just show you what to do, he explains why you do it and why you'd want to do it. I have 7 books on how to program in X-Code, Objective C, iOS - but they just don't compare to this one. Matt Neuberg should have just called it "The definitive guide" again ;-)
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan Lundell on June 9, 2011
Format: Paperback
I bought a stack of iOS books when I decided to write my first iPhone app about six months ago. I wish that this one had been in the stack; it's by a wide margin the best of the lot. Coverage of "fundamentals", including Objective-C, Xcode 4 and the App Store, is solid and useful. But where the book really shines is in its solid coverage of Cocoa Touch and its frameworks. Matt obviously knows from experience what he's writing about.

My list of iOS development essentials has expanded to three: Apple's documentation library, Stack Overflow, and Programming iOS 4.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By mko on July 26, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
Programming iOS 4 is one of the publications available on market that are devoted to iOS related programming. And I was quite impressed when I was reading it. First of all, it is based not only on iOS 4 but on XCode 4 as well. This is huge advantage because you don't have to think about transition between XCode 3 and XCode 4 while reading the book. Not only book is based on the XCode, but Matt provides you with an introduction to the tool. This way you can get familiar with it fairly easy. You will find information regarding how to access documentation, how to deal with code snippets, how to deal with code completion (BTW - if you are moving from any other IDE I suggest replacing Esc with Ctrl+space for code completion being invoked), static analysis of the code. It's a pity that this is another book where Instruments are not explained in greater details.

iOS development is based on Objective-C, which means that you have to get familiar with it when you move on from Java/C# world. Matt provides you with an introduction to the language. This section contain basic information related to C and Objective-C. Be warned here. I'd definitely suggest to buy some solid C guide - like a classic "C Language" by K&R. The same situation relates to Objective-C, go and buy something that is entirely devoted to language itself - Programming in Objective-C by G. Kochan would be good idea. However, this is not mandatory. If you need just a brief overview of the language, Matt provides all you need here. However, there are small issues in C introduction. Matt refers to "nil" which is not C standard - it is introduced by Objective-C. The same refers to NSString object. As far as I recall, you can't use them in pure C.
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More About the Author

Matt Neuburg started programming computers in 1968, when he was 14 years old, as a member of a literally underground high school club, which met once a week to do time-sharing on a bank of PDP-10s by way of primitive Teletype machines. He also occasionally used Princeton University's IBM-360/67, but gave it up in frustration when one day he dropped his punch cards. He majored in Greek at Swarthmore College and received his Ph.D. from Cornell University in 1981, writing his doctoral dissertation (about Aeschylus) on a mainframe. He proceeded to teach classical languages, literature, and culture at many well-known institutions of higher learning, most of which now disavow knowledge of his existence, and to publish numerous scholarly articles unlikely to interest anyone. Meanwhile he obtained an Apple IIc and became hopelessly hooked on computers again, migrating to a Macintosh in 1990. He wrote some educational and utility freeware, became an early regular contributor to the online journal TidBITS, and in 1995 left academe to edit MacTech Magazine. In August 1996 he became a freelancer, which means he has been looking for work ever since.

He remains a contributing editor for TidBITS. He is the author of Programming iOS 4, AppleScript: The Definitive Guide, REALbasic: The Definitive Guide, and Frontier: The Definitive Guide, all from O'Reilly Media, Inc., and of several eBooks in the popular Take Control series. He has also written several online guides, such as his introduction to rb-appscript. He has taught in developer training programs such as the AppleScript Pro Sessions. He is the author of the online help for many prominent Mac applications, such as Script Debugger, Affrus, Opal, and MacSpeech Dictate. He has written such widely used Mac freeware as MemoryStick, NotLight, and Thucydides. He has created (and uses) his own open source Ruby-based Web site development framework, RubyFrontier. In 2007 he was voted by MacTech readers as one of the 25 most influential people in the Macintosh community. He has written several iPhone applications under his own name (search the iPhone app store under "Neuburg"), as well as the widely used TidBITS News, plus some additional applications created under contract that he isn't allowed to talk about.