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Progress and Poverty (modern edition) Paperback – December 31, 2006


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Frequently Bought Together

Progress and Poverty (modern edition) + The Science of Political Economy: A Reconstruction of Its Principles in Clear and Systematic Form + Progress and Poverty: An Inquiry in the Cause of Industrial Depressions and of Increase of Want with Increase of Wealth... The Remedy
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 319 pages
  • Publisher: Robert Schalkenbach Foundation; First Edition edition (December 31, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0911312986
  • ISBN-13: 978-0911312980
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 5 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #595,579 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

The greatest economics treatist ever written by an American. --Michael Kinsley

The main, underlying idea of Henry George... is an argument that makes an awful lot of sense. --Joseph Stiglitz, Nobel Laureate; author of Globalization and Its Discontents

A century ago, Henry George was by far the most widely read writer on economics. He wrote about matters of deep and broad concern, with conviction - with a style whose passion and vigor commanded attention. The substance of his messages also justified attention then and does today. --C. Lowell Harriss, Columbia University

The main, underlying idea of Henry George... is an argument that makes an awful lot of sense. --Joseph Stiglitz, Nobel Laureate; author of Globalization and Its Discontents

A century ago, Henry George was by far the most widely read writer on economics. He wrote about matters of deep and broad concern, with conviction - with a style whose passion and vigor commanded attention. The substance of his messages also justified attention then and does today. --C. Lowell Harriss, Columbia University

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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See all 10 customer reviews
Preventing harmful land speculation is one.
Solar Man
Bob Drake's updating and abridgement of Henry George's landmark book on political economy is a pleasure to read.
Wyneth C. Achenbaum
It also provides a good analysis of any number of very modern problems.
taxpayer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

25 of 25 people found the following review helpful By taxpayer on April 10, 2007
Format: Paperback
Henry George's Progress and Poverty: An Inquiry into the Cause of Industrial Depressions and of Increase of Want with Increase of Wealth, The Remedy, written in 1877-79, was the best-selling nonfiction book of its time and remains, as Michael Kinsley wrote in 1987, "the greatest economic treatise ever written." It explains why poverty persists despite technological and political progress, and why economic recessions are still a constant threat. It also provides a good analysis of any number of very modern problems.

But for most modern readers, Henry George's original text is not easy going. It assumes a large vocabulary and includes enough classical references that recent editions have included an extensive glossary of mythological and historical terms. What Drake has done with this modernization is to make George's thoughts more accessible to today's audience, who will find that by understanding them they can much better comprehend the issues that affect the lives of us all.

Several of the Henry George Schools have begun using this book, with very encouraging results.
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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Heather T. Remoff on September 14, 2007
Format: Paperback
' If ever there was a time when the world needed the wisdom of Henry George, it is now. His classic work, Progress and Poverty, should be required reading for anyone concerned with establishing social and economic justice in a world that seems increasingly characterized by greed. The Drake modernized edition makes George's unique insights accessible to those of us who struggle with the pull of conflicting demands on our time. Even so, I recommend an unorthodox approach to this book. The early chapters demand a level of concentration that might be unusual except in someone deeply committed to understanding the root cause of the growing gap between rich and poor. Therefore, start by getting your passions flowing. Read the "Publisher's Forward." Then flip to the afterword and be stirred by Agnes de Mille's answer to the question: "Who was Henry George?" Her writing is as beautiful as her dance. You may now be moved to tackle the economic theories of wages and distribution, but I suggest deferring for just a bit longer. Read the
last half of the book first. Begin with Chapter 25, "The True Remedy." Once you've read through to the conclusion, the fire in your belly ought to be sufficient to carry you through the fine points of economic argument contained in the first twenty-four chapters. You won't be disappointed. As Bob Drake, Editor, notes in his preface, "Those who pick up this book are likely to share some concern about the problem of poverty; those who finish it may also find some cause for hope....It
was, and still is, a plan for peace, prosperity, equality, and justice."
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Wyneth C. Achenbaum on June 28, 2007
Format: Paperback
Bob Drake's updating and abridgement of Henry George's landmark book on political economy is a pleasure to read. Those who have read the original will re-experience that pleasure. Those who have not yet become acquainted with these ideas will find a smooth entry mode.

Bob's updating started with a thought-by-thought rewrite, which maintains both the flow and the flavor of the original, without the voluminous verbal illustrations and extended sentences that George used. If the original was in the language of the Book of Common Prayer, the new edition is in the language of a contemporary news magazine -- readable, accessible, rich in content.

And, oh, what content! Henry George saw in his day the source of the problems which afflicted our society then and which still plague us today. The Remedy he prescribes is just as relevant today as it was then.

If you say you are concerned about poverty, concerned about the wildly skewed distributions of wealth, income and the power that flow from them, concerned about the protecting the environment from ill treatment by people and corporations who have little incentive to do otherwise, concerned about housing affordability, concerned about wages that aren't sufficient to meet a young family's most modestly defined needs, concerned about urban sprawl and long commutes and large amounts of energy expended on daily transportation, you need to know this book. It will provide you a very different lens through which to understand these problems, and to see how these dots (and others important to most of us) connect. And best of all, P&P not only lays out the nature of the problem, it prescribes the remedy.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By G. C. Picchetti on March 5, 2008
Format: Paperback
What a shame it would be to miss the message of Henry George because the original Poverty & Progress requires hours of reading. Most of us have read it for classes at one of the Henry George Schools. The original has 565 pages in the paperback form not including the glossary.
Bob Drake's edition is short & simple. He changed none of the content. He did make the Preface the Afterword which was written by Agnes George de Mille, the choreographer, in New York in 1979. She was Henry George's grand-daughter.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Harold D. Thomas on May 18, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is an unusually easy to read treatise on economics, thanks to Bob Drake's abridgment and recasting. For those who have been confused about "mainstream" economics, Henry George reduces economics to its essentials. He presents a very plausible case for economics being a relationship between land, labor, and capital. Unlike Karl Marx, he says that all three are valuable; but that the ability to speculate in land artificially enriches landowners at the expense of capitalists and workers.

George's solution is to impose a single tax on the unimproved value of land (that is, based only on its location and natural quality) and abolish all others. In George's view, this tax would be easy to collect (every county auditor/assessor has this information already) and would remove the intrusive bureaucracy of income and corporate tax collection.

However, I did not find anything in George's theory to act as a brake on the greed of government
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