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Projection and Re-Collection in Jungian Psychology: Reflections of the Soul (Reality of the Psyche Series) Paperback – December 19, 1985

ISBN-13: 978-0875484174 ISBN-10: 0875484174 Edition: Reprint

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Projection and Re-Collection in Jungian Psychology: Reflections of the Soul (Reality of the Psyche Series) + Shadow and Evil in Fairy Tales (A C.G. Jung Foundation Book) + The Interpretation of Fairy Tales
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Product Details

  • Series: Reality of the Psyche Series
  • Paperback: 254 pages
  • Publisher: Open Court Publishing Company; Reprint edition (December 19, 1985)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0875484174
  • ISBN-13: 978-0875484174
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.6 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #512,350 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Language Notes

Text: English, German (translation) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

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This book is well worth the effort you will put into reading it.
Jon G. Jackson
This is such an important book for understanding the mischief projections cause.
Susan
Such rare moments of re-collection are the aims of Jungian analysis.
Steven Herrmann

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

78 of 80 people found the following review helpful By Jon G. Jackson on June 8, 2001
Format: Paperback
This is one of the few books Marie-Louise von Franz actually wrote (as opposed to being a transcription of seminars she gave at the Jung Institute in Zurich). Thus, in many ways, it is quite dense, and a difficult read. But, I believe this to be one of her finest works, and I'm more than pleased that Open Court has kept it in print. Herein, von Franz details (in two separate sections of the book) the history of scientific discovery and the history of the evolution of religion. The interesting thing, however, is that her focus is on the *errors* made at each step along the way. These, she maintains, represent projections of the unconscious psyche. And, therefore, we have much to learn about ourselves by studying how these things came to be. It truly is a fascinating piece of writing by my favorite of the first generation Jungian analysts.
I'm also a reader of Michel Foucault, who offers another history of human thought. But, unlike Foucault (himself a psychologist), who's focus is almost exclusively on issues relating to external polical power, von Franz's focus is inward, trying to define (as did Jung) the nature of our individual unconscious selves. If your goal is a better understanding of who *you* are, then you should read this book.
Current Jungian thought, influenced highly by Object Relations theory, has tended to minimize von Franz as merely one of the "handmaidens" of Carl Jung. But this woman is far more than just that! She is an intelligent (even brilliant) individual, who was able to take Jung's thought into realms he only alluded to. This book is well worth the effort you will put into reading it. HIGHLY recommended!
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48 of 52 people found the following review helpful By Igor Biryukov on March 26, 2000
Format: Paperback
Great writer and scientist on her own right, Marie-Louise Von Franz in her book explains and summarizes complex ideas of Carl Jung with good style and clear understanding of the subject. The book deals very comfortably with some of the most difficult subjects of Jungian psychology: projections, the problem of evil and synchronicity. A must read for everyone interested in Jungian psychology and spirituality.
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23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Neal J. Pollock VINE VOICE on December 25, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book explores psychological projection of internal contents onto the external world & its inhabitants & the growth process of withdrawing such projections (re-collection). Von Franz seeks to be scientific & uses analogies from physics & principles of the Philosophy of Science: p. 38: "A general psychological law: The statement of the new truth reveals the previous conceptions as `projections' & tries to draw them into the psychic inner world, & at the same time it announces a new myth, which now passes for the finally discovered `absolute' truth." As one of Jung's primary direct disciples, she explains many of his theories: Self, Collective Unconscious, synchronicity, etc. She discusses evil: demons vs. daimons & notes parallels with Christian mysticism & related mythology. She interestingly analyzes mirroring & reflection among ego, Self, perceived world, & synchronicity. IMHO, her description of ego maps into Buddhism: p. 170: "The field of ego-consciousness is a loose structure of originally separate single islands of consciousness that have gradually grown together. The seams are therefore still perceptible in many people." She notes parallels with other ancient beliefs: "in Stoic philosophy there is the theory that single human souls are sparks of the cosmic fiery ether, that is, of the world-soul...When a human being really tries to lead a spiritual life, these `sparks' gradually grow together into one inner light of reason...This idea of sparks of the psyche...is also to be found in the systems of various Gnostics." And, p. 176: "Individuation is not an egocentric affair but demands & even rigorously necessitates human relatedness," paralleling Buddhist emphasis on compassion accompanying enlightenment. She explains the mutual dependence of ego & Self: p.Read more ›
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Steven Herrmann on May 24, 2010
Format: Paperback
Steven B. Herrmann, PhD, MFT
Author of "Walt Whitman: Shamanism, Spiritual Democracy, and the World Soul"

To be sure, this is one of Marie Louise von Franz' most brilliant books: a depth-analysis into the nature of projection and re-collection in Jungian psychology. Von Franz defines projection clearly in chapter one, where she points out that the phenomenon under clinical investigation leads to psychological problems when the archaic identity of a subject doing the projecting leads to disturbances in adaptation, at which point integration of the projected content into the subject is desirable (7). As she points out the archaic identity between subject and object still lives at the very bottom of the psyche and this lower and more "primitive" level contains the real secret of all life-intensity and cultural creativity (8). Her aim is to get to the bottom of the projection-making process, to show through her erudition how the goal of Jungian analysis is to help the patient and presumably the reader not to project anymore. This is also the aim, she says, of Zen Buddhist meditation and although she sees such detached consciousness, at least at times, through an idealizing lens, she says we average human beings will, for the most part, have to continue for the rest of our lives to recognize our projections for what they are: as mistaken judgments about people, situations, and events (199). She posits for analytical psychology five stages in the process of withdrawing projections. This leads her to the following discussion. "One of the oldest ways of symbolizing projection," she says, "is by means of projectiles, especially the magic arrow or shot that harms other people" (20).
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