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Promethea, Book 4 Paperback – April 1, 2005


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Product Details

  • Series: Promethea (Book 4)
  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: WildStorm (April 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401200311
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401200312
  • Product Dimensions: 10.4 x 6.6 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #145,313 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on April 11, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Promethea book 4 continues the quest of Promethea (Sophie) and

Barbara to search for Barbara's lost husband Steve in the Immateria. The story is more of a platform for Alan Moore to share his learnings of magic (I remember reading he had studied magic or even practised it). However, it is full of interesting observations and connections, that tie together science, different religions and the origin of the universe. He uses Aleister Crowley as a character throughout the plot, and I suspect Moore must have used Crowley's material for much of his research. I'm curious how much of these connections were drawn from Moore's own insights and how much from his readings - not sure.

The layout of each page are creative and experimental. Sometimes, I found myself reading the panels in the wrong sequence, but quickly adjusted. The artwork and styles are a feast for the eyes. When I compare Promethea to some of my early comics from the 70's and 80's, it is amazing how finely-crafted the art, creative the stories, and experimental the compositions are these days. Amazing. All standards are being raised and broken.

The best story in my opinion was the nicely written gem about two Prometheas, from both sides of the Crusades and its juxtaposition with a modern conflict between two Prometheas. I thought the story ended poignantly, with a light-hearted epilogue. This story really reinforces the myth of Promethea and is a tribute to how deeply Alan has explored this character and the potentials of the myth.

The last part of the book refocuses back to the material plane and sets up a new plotline that leaves me eagerly waiting for the 5th book.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By wiredweird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on February 5, 2006
Format: Paperback
The pace picks up in this continuation of the Promethea saga, starting where P3 left off. P-Sophie is wandering the ethereal realms guided by previous Prometheas. (Yes, they're deceased, but they consider it bad form to dwell on the little things.) P-Stacy is on duty back in the real world, and getting to like her job. After all, in that world, "super-hero" (or something like it) is considered respectable work.

There are two problems, though. First, P-Stacy isn't exactly considered a hero, and the FBI is on her trail. Second, P-Sophie is done with her trip to The World Beyond, but P-Stacy doesn't want to hand the job back. So, we have problems.

Moore's story moves faster in this volume, with a lot less of the oppressive pseudomysticism that bogged down in earlier volumes. Art by Williams and Gray only makes it better, and in varied visual idioms. Chapter 1 features painterly cloudscapes, with the occasional nod to Seurat. Ch. 3 switches to a flat, graphic, woodcut style. Ch. 4 experiments with color saturation - or lack of it. Ch. 5 draws on the comic idiom itself, but without smug self-referentiality. And, as in any good narrative art, the art moves the narration forward, adding its own meaning to the script.

The Promethea series has been good but uneven. This is not just a step forward for her (their?) story, but a step up.

//wiredweird
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Killian HALL OF FAME on April 12, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have been slogging through the Promethea books, always learning a little something, but mostly dazzled by the inventive methods Alan Moore and his collaborators have been activating what is otherwise a fairly static story and one that I barely understand. The pictures make it worthwhile , but you'd think it would have been easy enough to supply a reason why Sophie Bangs felt it necessary to forsake her earthly duties to follow Barbara Shelley into the beyond. OK, I know she's there to make sure Barbara doesn't feel lonely, or get lost, but come on, Sophie, all of your home planet is falling into pieces, and what's worse, you have arbitrarily matched up Grace and Stacia and made them into a weird, punk amalgam of Prometheas that just don't mix, plus, she's evil.

So what is the excuse?

Dozens of issues later and I still don't know what a science villain is, nor a science hero, but that is probably just me being slow on the uptake.

My favorite part of PROMETHEA BVOLUME FOUR comes when she and Barbara spot Aleister Crowley sodomizing Victor Neuberg on the desert floor, a real life incident that led to Neuberg's eventual mental collapse. Neuberg was a very great English poet whose works have been strangely neglected, but maybe this comic will make young people reach for his verse once more? Some of the details have been changed, I think, but Alan Moore probably knows what he is doing (for one thing it was Neuberg who played the active role in the desert working, something which abhorred him to think of afterwards and which led to his cycles of madness and his extreme shivsring whenever one of his circle even dared mention that name of the man whom he'd topped all those years before), but pictorially it is probable better to have the ugly man do the mounting, plus it reflects an earlier issue in which Sophie sought out the caress and the "wand" of hideous fat old Jack Faust.

That trial at the end of the book, though, what cheese.
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By S. Lehnert on March 20, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
By the time I was finished with this book, I felt as though my mind had completely exploded, so much information, in such a way that it wasn't completely overwhelming. It made learning about Kabbalah easier to approach, and makes a person curious to know more about it. Kudos to the wonderful Alan Moore for this creation!
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