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I Promise Not to Suffer: A Fool For Love Hikes the Pacific Crest Trail Paperback – April 15, 2013


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I Promise Not to Suffer: A Fool For Love Hikes the Pacific Crest Trail + The Trail Life: How I Loved it, Hated it, and Learned from it + Almost Somewhere: Twenty-Eight Days on the John Muir Trail (Outdoor Lives)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Mountaineers Books (April 15, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1594857458
  • ISBN-13: 978-1594857454
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (98 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #353,757 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Of the many books that I have read about hiking the Pacific Crest Trail, none have captured the trail experience from so many different perspectives. Single hikers, couples, and those who stay behind will all enjoy Gail Storey's account of the challenges, the beauty, and the PCT community found along the way."---Liz Bergeron, Executive Director and CEO, Pacific Crest Trail Association.

At times wrenching memoir, at times hilarious, I Promise Not to Suffer pulls no punches and has a wicked sense of fun. Storey reminds me again of what is possible with a big imagination, a dose of scrappy courage, and a lot of love. ---Peter Heller, author of The Dog Stars and Kook

Some have called Gail Storey the Nora Ephron of the wilderness. With her own unique wit, Storey shares Ephron's commitment to creating and tending a long, nourishing marriage. I Promise Not to Suffer is a portrait of a union that does not fray or break under pressure but is forged, toughened, and tenderized. - --Sara Davidson, author of Leap!, Loose Change, and The December Project

Witty, wise, and full of heart, Gail Storey's winning memoir of her hike on the Pacific Crest Trail at the age of fifty-six is a book for every one who ever dreamed of taking the road less traveled. I Promise Not to Suffer is as inspiring as it is hilarious, as poignant as it is smart. It's one of those oh-please-don't-let-it-end books. I'd carry it in my backpack anywhere ---Cheryl Strayed, author of Wild

About the Author

Gail D. Storey is the author of I Promise Not to Suffer: A Fool for Love Hikes the Pacific Crest Trail, Winner of the Barbara Savage Award from The Mountaineers Books (2013). Her first novel, The Lord's Motel (Persea Books, NY), was praised by the New York Times Book Review as "a tale of unwise judgments and wise humor." Her second novel, God's Country Club (Persea Books, NY) was a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers Selection. She has won many awards, and her fiction, nonfiction, and poetry have been published in numerous magazines. Her literary papers are archived in the University of Houston Libraries Special Collections. Formerly administrative director of the University of Houston Creative Writing Program, she is now a hoopdancer and comic performance artist. She is married to Porter Storey, MD FACP FAAHPM, a national leader in hospice and palliative medicine. Together they bicycled on their tandem from Maine to San Diego, and now live in Boulder, Colorado.

More About the Author

WINNER OF THE NATIONAL OUTDOOR BOOK AWARD

Gail D. Storey is the author of I PROMISE NOT TO SUFFER: A Fool for Love Hikes the Pacific Crest Trail, Winner of the National Outdoor Book Award, Foreword IndieFab Book of the Year Award, Nautilus Silver Award, Colorado Book Award, and Barbara Savage Award from The Mountaineers Books (2013). An inexperienced hiker and camper, she left a comfortable urban life to hike the 2,663-mile PCT with her husband, and lived to tell this hilariously harrowing tale.

Her first novel, THE LORD'S MOTEL (Persea Books, NY) was praised by the New York Times Book Review as "a tale of unwise judgments and wise humor." Her second novel, GOD'S COUNTRY CLUB (Persea Books, NY), was a Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers Selection.

She and her husband, Porter Storey, MD FACP FAAHPM, a national leader in hospice and palliative medicine, bicycled on their tandem from Texas to Maine and Texas to San Diego. They live in Boulder, Colorado, where Gail is notorious for jumping out of cakes and for her "sins of humor."



Customer Reviews

Read this book if you want to experience something amazing while ensconced in your hammock on the last days of Summer.
Georgina
Her adventure story is enriched with humor, soul-searching, beautiful prose, crisp you-are-there descriptions, majesty, poignancy, and, always, honesty.
Rebecca Dashevsky
Gail Storeys tales of high adventure on the Pacific Crest Trail with her husband, Porter are written with great humor and wit.
Randy Godfrey

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

49 of 53 people found the following review helpful By Rebecca on June 27, 2013
Verified Purchase
Obviously other readers enjoyed it based on the reviews, but this book was not for me. I found the author annoying.

I've read several books about solo long hikes, and I was interested in reading about a couple doing a hike since my hubby and I are interested in doing one. I wish I had skipped this book.

The author, with three master's degrees and apparently no job, is an ex-hippie turned spoiled princess. She says things, in all seriousness, like "I tried to pare myself down to an essential self before I married Porter," and "I didn't need protecting from anything but my small, imagined self," and "What was my higher self, and could it save me from my lower?" (Note that "self" is a recurring theme.)

Porter, aptly named considering he carries double the weight of his wife's pack and has to rescue her constantly from her various petty perils, even asks his own wife to leave the trail shortly into their hike.

In the planning stage, Porter made their backpacks. Yes, he actually sewed them. He made their sleeping bag and tarp. He did all the research and planned their route. He made their stove. In the meantime, he works as a doctor.

The writer, on the other hand, never talks about leaving a job or any other responsibilities. Instead, she throws dinner parties with friends. She crows about her slim frame, thick hair, low body fat, and 32D chest. She whines about how much she's going to miss the red sports car her husband gave her for Valentine's Day.

And it goes on and on. Actually, it doesn't really go on that far, because....well, I don't want to spoil the book.

Others liked the book according to the reviews...but I was not a fan.
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26 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Life Learner on April 16, 2013
When you think, "I can't...," here's a great read to help you through. When you wonder what a marriage "can be," even under severe duress, here's a great read, too. ALL delivered with a helluva sense of humor. Gail Storey lets us into her private world of hope and despair, dependence and inter-dependence. Following her wild journey, I dredged up the most challenging experiences of my own life, but never felt alone. Her honesty is unflinching as she learns her own strengths and limits in the face of extreme physical, emotional and spiritual adversity. Her mother is dying while she hikes remote backcountry with a satellite phone and her amazing but very different creature of a hubbie, Porter the hospice doctor.

Reading this book fed my trust and faith in Life. Personally, I come from a family with a legacy of ongoing suicides, the most recent of which was my sister just last year. It was wildly uplifting to read another woman's tale of tough, event violent origins leading to a life of kindness to self and others. Learning to love more deeply and extend that to ourselves as well; how much better does Life become? In my universe we're here to love and to learn.

As a hiker who has lusted over the prospect of walking both the Appalachian Trail and the Pacific Crest Trail, I also had hopes that the book would move me to make a thru-hike of my own. But it finally sank in that this was her path and not mine, leaving me insanely grateful to have her vicarious experience.
Hopefully she will continue to write about her life. I'll read it.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Larry Patten on April 15, 2013
Verified Purchase
I don't recall how I stumbled across Gail Storey's "I Promise Not To Suffer." But wherever or whenever I learned about it, I was already hooked. Though I haven't hiked the Pacific Crest Trail, I've tramped along much of the Sierra, indeed was married in the chapel nestled in Yosemite Valley. Additionally, like Storey's husband Porter, I work with hospice.

So she had me at the cover: a personal hike, the babe-in-the-woods tale, the Sierra Nevada and hospice insights tossed in to sweeten the deal. I was sure it would be a good read.

Then I started reading, and could hardly stop. "I Promise Not to Suffer" is a great read. Because her writing is clean and simple, I felt like Storey and I shared a long lunch. She never got to finish her food, because I kept asking, "Then what happened?" And another chapter would unfold. I was still "listening" to her when the restaurant shut its doors!

This is no simple tale of a neophyte struggling into the wilderness and finding herself. Sure, you could sum up Storey's account in that way . . . but then you'd miss the odd, old-fashioned and yet twenty-first century romance she has with her husband, or the brittle life-troubling and life-affirming relationship with her mother, or even the moment she received a wondrous ultimate truth comment from Billy Goat, the nickname of a grizzled four-time Pacific Crest Trail hiker.

Storey's story is a revelation. You'll learn about her, and--in the best sense of memoirs--you'll learn about you.

Read it for the trail adventures. Read it for the sex. Read it for the alpenglow and high mountain passes. Read it for getting inside the mind and heart of an honest sojourner. Read it and enjoy every damn, sweaty, blistered, mosquito-infested revelation.

How wonderful to share Gail Storey's journey!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Happy and healthy (now) on May 1, 2013
I thoroughly enjoyed "I Promise Not to Suffer" from the first page to the last. As most good memoirs, it works on many levels. At the surface, it's a fascinating description of the gear and mental, emotional and physical preparations needed to accomplish the feat of hiking at altitude for months at a stretch. At a deeper level, it is a story of how, by paring their lives down to the bare essentials, Gail and Porter open themselves up to the rawest of adventures: an inner journey of intimacy with themselves as individuals and as a couple.

I loved Storey's simple yet vivid description of the trail and their days hiking, from frigid mornings when they had to shove their chilled feet into frozen socks, to the night when Gail and the sleeping bag and tarp were blown off a mountain top. I could relate to her moods under the harsh conditions and physical challenges, and I howled at some of the bickering matches she had with her "stoic Mountain Man" husband. I also had to slow myself down from reading ahead to savor the beautiful passages where Storey describes her transformation from distracted city-dweller to profoundly grateful citizen of the Earth. "I never much cared for nature," she writes, "but nature cares for us."

Without preaching or turning herself into a self-proclaimed expert, Storey manages to captivate readers with her curiosity about herself and others, and her willingness to ask complex and sometimes troubling questions about relationships. Although she may not always have the answers (does anyone?), her prose conveys rich and valuable insights. I admit, I am still thinking about this honest and unusual love story many days later.
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