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Proof of Vedic Culture's Global Existence Paperback – October, 2000


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 353 pages
  • Publisher: World Relief Network (October 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0961741066
  • ISBN-13: 978-0961741068
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 6 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (44 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #328,878 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Stephen Knapp has been studying the Vedic philosophy, its history, and the traditions of India for over 30 years. He is also a sadhaka, a practitioner of its spiritual aspects, and has traveled extensively throughout India, visiting all of the major holy sites of numerous religions. He now writes, gives slide shows, and lectures about his experiences and the knowledge of the Vedic spiritual science.

Other books by Stephen Knapp carried by Amazon.com include:

The Secret Teachings of the Vedas : The Eastern Answers to the Mysteries of Life

The Universal Path to Enlightenment

The Vedic Prophecies : A New Look into the Future

How the Universe was Created and Our Purpose In It

Toward World Peace : Seeing the Unity Between Us All

Facing Death : Welcoming the Afterlife


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 34 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 2, 2003
Format: Paperback
I'm very impressed with the amount of research that was presented in this book. It is interesting and one of the few nonfiction books that I could not put down once I started reading it. So many things I've wondered about and questions I've had were answered here by the information that made a lot of sense to me.
There are all kinds of bits and pieces of evidence scattered throughout numerous books and articles on the widespread influence of Vedic culture, and Stephen has collected a large amount of this to present in this one condensed volume. As he mentions in his Preface, which most critics don't seem to read, he has compiled the information from many sources and researchers who have been studying this for many years, and you can decide what evidence is most agreeable or not. However, whether you agree with it all or not, the credibility is when the numerous references and researchers that are mentioned all allude to the premise that the area of India was far larger, and Vedic culture far more influential, hundreds of years ago, creating a global culture. And this book points out why and how it can be recognized.
Personally I found the book to be fascinating and well documented and referenced. There's a lot more here than a few points of comparative linguistics. You can see the connections of the different areas of the world and religions to Vedic culture, which is the real point of the book. So if you want to get an idea of how Vedic culture had spread around the world and had been a worldwide influence, this book will certainly give you insights into this. As others have said, this book is a must read.
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18 of 24 people found the following review helpful By balance o oholic on October 18, 2005
Format: Paperback
Linguistic comments by negative reviewers should not deter one from reading this book. The notes on non standard linguists are pure rubbish. Non standard according to whom? and defined by whom?

Theories about Sanskrit and Indian culture written by European 'Historians'and experts with an agenda which are taken as Gospal should not be a factor. History is written by the winners to distort their world view. This book is an honest attempt to rebut the distorted theories taken as fact in the western world which should be disputed.

I would urge the reader to read with an open mind without allowing those with a hidden agenda to poison the well.

A good attempt at exposing Vedic ideas. Not fully sold on all aspects of the book, but certainly a much more honest attempt then prevailing theories put forward by Colonial quacks.
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12 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Neel A. Shah on October 1, 2006
Format: Paperback
This is an easy to read book, full of interesting information for those interested in spirituality and the history of religions.

It uses examples that are not always scientifically proven, and yes, the claims are so amazing that even if only one tenth of them would be true, it still would mean a radical new view on world history.

But science is not absolute, and so called scientists have been known to cover up the truth. I, for one, am glad to be able to read about some other perspectives on world history.

Some reviewers mentioned that comparing languages on the basis of similarity in writing is not acceptable, and they gave some examples.

I would like to give some counter-examples that I found rather convincing, such as the names of the months - Saptamber, Ashtamber, Navamber, Dashamber in Sanskrit - the analogies between Krishna and Christ, Abraham and Brahma in their contextual meaning, and the fact that the Lithuanian language still contains so much Sanskrit.

The book has a militant undertone and after reading about the Taj Mahal it is easy to understand why. This magnificent Vedic palace - like much of the Vedic culture - has been appropriated by conquerors and up to today is still widely considered the summum of Islam civilisation. Even though there is ample evidence that this is not the case, we are still taught to believe the false stories fabricated by occupiers.

It is time that the world learns the truth about this.
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12 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A. Pathak on December 1, 2002
Format: Paperback
This is a great book for anyone who has slightest interest in the old vedic civilization. It refutes the fallacy in the old historical books about aryan invasion etc and gloriously proves vedic culture as one source of all religions in the present world. This book is full of some very intriguing facts which really makes one think and believe the author. However, sometimes the associations of different words/names of places to a sanskrit word seems far fetched. Even then, this book is a must read for anyone interested in the subject.
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20 of 28 people found the following review helpful By SRINIVASA RAO BATCHU on March 11, 2001
Format: Paperback
History remains the most abused subject of education throughout the world. This is true even in India. As claimed by Stephen Knapp, not only the people outside India lost touch with their Vedic roots but also Indians themselves. With centuries of assault, humiliation, molestation the present day history of Vedic culture as depicted in the classroom books presents a contradictory picture of what was really happened. Very few blessed people have had the chance of going through this sacred knowledge and associated training in India. But the truth especially in the matters of religion can be appreciated only when one comes out of reasoning. One has to be completely open to understand sensitive matters like religion and ancestoral links which are very personal to everyone. Even for a devout follower of Sanatana Dharma, there are many things in his/her spiritual life which do not hold up to real life terms. But deep in heart persons who had gone through these know that their experiences are simply beautiful and true. It is hard to explain all such incidents unless one goes through them. I guess Stephen wants to bring this point forth by establishing the truth that this culture has spread over the globe and has influence over all the regions.
Whether one belives in what is explained in this book or not, Stephen Knapp has done an excellent job in trying to throw light on a broad and yet complex issue that makes it worth reading.
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