Property, Seventh Edition and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
  • List Price: $223.00
  • Save: $208.52 (94%)
Rented from Amazon Warehouse Deals
To Rent, select Shipping State from options above
Due Date: Aug 15, 2014
FREE return shipping at the end of the semester. Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with rentals.
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Used Book - Signs of wear and tear, writing and highlights present - Content is not affected - Satisfaction Guaranteed on Every Order - In stock - Ships Fast
Add to Cart
Qty:1
  • List Price: $223.00
  • Save: $24.78 (11%)
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it tomorrow, April 18? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
Trade in your item
Get a $2.78
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

Property, 7th Edition Hardcover

ISBN-13: 978-0735588998 ISBN-10: 0735588996 Edition: 7th

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$198.22
$90.00 $18.49
Paperback
"Please retry"

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



Frequently Bought Together

Property, 7th Edition + Cases and Materials on Criminal Law, 6th (American Casebooks) + Cases and Materials on Contracts: Making and Doing Deals, 3d (American Casebooks)
Price for all three: $556.63

Buy the selected items together

If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle edition for only $2.99 (Save 98%). Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Series: Property
  • Hardcover: 1280 pages
  • Publisher: Aspen Publishers; 7 edition (February 26, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0735588996
  • ISBN-13: 978-0735588998
  • Product Dimensions: 10.2 x 7.7 x 2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #18,719 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

I highly recommend this book if somehow you have a choice in casebooks.
Paul
It's very well organized, and I love the footnotes which provide relevant and brief background on the parties and cases.
J. Peyton
As someone else already noted, if you're here, it's because the book was assigned and you have to buy it.
Jon

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Jon on April 3, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As someone else already noted, if you're here, it's because the book was assigned and you have to buy it. But in the slim chance some professor out there is reading this and trying to make a decision, I'll just say this book is terrible. Of course, I can only compare it to other casebooks I have used this year, but this is by far the worst. A few of the main issues:

1. Unedited Cases - As others have noted, the cases could be edited down substantially to isolate relevant legal issues. The failure to do this results not only in wasted time (the enemy of the law student), but also confusion. The confusion arises because a case will include discussion of ancillary issues to the resolution of the case that are discussed elsewhere in the chapter (frequently later) in greater depth, and there's no contextualization about which is the majority, outdated, etc. Because they are often irrelevant to the "point" of the case, this confusion and delay could be easily avoided through more judicious editing. (Also, there are a lot of "throat-clearing" cases, which just announce a new rule. Editors, here's an idea: instead of wasting my time by making me read 6-8 pages of bull, why not just provide a paragraph explaining the historical development, policy, and the new rule? Oh yeah, because the more pages, the more we pay.).

2. "Notes" - I suppose the authors deserve some credit for attempting to do what many casebooks don't by occasionally providing brief snippets explaining black letter law. But it was almost as if the authors just couldn't bring themselves to complete this pedagogical sacrilege, and the result is confusing passages which obliquely discuss legal issues without offering satisfactory or even organized explanations.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Goodeal11 on December 11, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Dukeminier has the unique gift of making even simple topics as opaque as possible. You will need supplements, lots of them, because of the awful way this book is structured, cases chosen, the odd phrasing and, in particular, how future interests are presented. Want proof - Look at "Acing Property" supplement where they give you a special appendix for the way Dukeminier presents things, particularly Rule Against Perpetuities - something already too complicated on its own that Duke manages to foul up further. I really wish law professors would destroy the forced demand for this terrible (more so than most prop casebooks, and achievement in itself) text.
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By YoJamesBo on February 13, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I'll just rehash a couple of the points other reviewers have already mentioned: First, this book needs an editor. Or ten. The text rambles not just at points, but frequently. The authors will raise a point, then drop it, then raise it again three paragraphs later only to dismiss it on the grounds that it should be treated IN ANOTHER COURSE. Helpful. Really! The authors are also fond of - instead of explaining the finer points of the topic they treat - sending you to another case (or cases) not included in the book. That would be ok, I guess, if the cases they pointed you to were helpful, but often they're dealing with substantially different situations, with completely different outcomes. And without any commentary to help you reconcile them with what the book contains, well you get the picture.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Adam R. Wickens on February 13, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is the least useful, or alternatively, most detrimental textbook I have ever used. Property can be a difficult subject, and I understand that it's tough to trace the history of the subject from feudalism to the current day, but this book botches the entire task.

One specific complaint is that the problems often pose new ideas that were not covered in the text. As if that wasn't difficult enough, the problem will then direct you to go look up a case with different facts that should have a different outcome than the problem. Not helpful.

Another issue concerning the problems is the way the text approached the Rule Against Perpetuities. The book introduces class gifts at the same times and has you do problems about how the two interrelate without first addressing them separately. This is the hardest topic in the course and the book made it unnecessarily more difficult.

Finally, the editing is atrocious and the prose is dense when it is not entirely opaque. If I turned some of those passages in to my legal writing professor, I would be excoriated.

This book sucks.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By C. Morris on February 16, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Well, we all know that if you're looking at this, you have to get it. Bah. Or, you could do what I did. The difference between the 7th and the 6th editions is minimal. The cases are (I think to a fault) identical, you just miss out on a chunk of stuff on estates that's covered in the 7th edition and glossed over in the 6th. My solution? Get the older edition, get a brief book keyed to the current edition of the textbook, and teach myself estates from the Examples and Explanations, because that was much clearer anyway. If you ever get stuck now knowing what page is assigned (can happen after the estates section, but not before, really), just ask a classmate what case you're on, and there you go, back on track for the rest of the semester.
I felt like this book liked to play tricks, like set up cases that seemed like they should morally come out for party A just to turn around and say that it's coming out for party B, and only then explain whatever rule it was that determined it. I get frustrated when my casebooks play hide-the-ball. My professors do enough of that!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa56afb04)