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The Proposition (Steelbook Packaging)


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Product Details

  • Actors: David Gulpilil, John Hurt, Noah Taylor, Danny Huston, Robert Morgan
  • Directors: John Hillcoat
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Color, Dolby, Limited Edition, NTSC, Subtitled, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Subtitles: Spanish
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.66:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: R (Restricted)
  • Studio: FIRST LOOK PICTURES
  • DVD Release Date: August 19, 2008
  • Run Time: 104 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (181 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0018RU3ZQ
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #237,204 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "The Proposition (Steelbook Packaging)" on IMDb

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

The Proposition is a visually stunning tale of loyalty betrayal and retribution set on the frontier of 1880's Australia.In the harsh unforgiving landscape of the Outback Charlie Burns is presented with an impossible proposition by local law enforcer Captain Stanley; the only way to save his younger brother Mikey from the gallows is to track down and kill Arthur his psychotic older brother.Meanwhile Captain Stanley has other problems to contend with. Having given up their comfortable life he is desperate to shield his innocent wife Martha from the brutalities of their new surroundings. He also faces mounting pressure from renegade natives and his superior Eden Fletcher to bring order to the region.An uneasy sense of foreboding grows as events close in and each character faces a punishing moral dilemma that leads to a murderous climax. LIMITED EDITION STEELBOOK PACKAGING.

Customer Reviews

If you like a good story and good acting and good directing then see this movie.
Steve
Historically, and from a character perspective, there's still mining to be done in western films, and THE PROPOSITION gives us a great sense of both.
B. Merritt
Like a good movie that makes you think should, the lines are blurred as to whom really is the bad guy at the end of the day.
Stephen Lerch

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

127 of 138 people found the following review helpful By A. Sandoc on August 1, 2006
When I first saw John Hillcoat's film The Proposition I was literally shocked and dumbstruck with what I had just witnessed. As a long-time aficionado of the horror genre I could say that part of me has become desensitized to onscreen violence and nothing really shocks me. Even though I've seen films with more violence throughout its running time, The Proposition just had a heavy sense of despair, moral ambiguity, and a Miltonian feel throughout. The film felt like how it would be if one accepted an offer from one of the damned to stroll down to the Nine Circles of Hell. As much as I didn't want to accept that offer the curiosity of what I might see won out. That's how I was able to sit through the entirety of Hillcoat's ultra-violent and nihilistic tale of lawless and amoral individuals in the untamed wilderness of 1880's Australian Outback.

I must agree with film critic Roger Ebert when he said The Proposition seemed to mirror another dark and violent tale. Hillcoat's film shares so much the same themes and tone as Cormac McCarthy's brutal novel, Blood Meridian, that one almost wondered if the film was adapted from McCarthy's great novel. But similarities aside, Hillcoat and Nick Cave's (director and writer respectively) film can clearly stand on its own two bloody legs.

The film begins with a bloody siege and shootout and we're soon introduced to two of the three Burns' brothers. We soon find out that both brothers, Charlie (played by Guy Pearce)and Mikey (played by Richard Wilson) are outlaws wanted for a multitude of heinous crimes with a recent one the senseless rape and murder of the Hopkins family. One Capt. Stanley (Ray Winstone) who acts as law in this particular area of the Outback. He's gives older brother Charlie a proposition.
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49 of 51 people found the following review helpful By RMurray847 VINE VOICE on June 10, 2006
This film has often been compared to Eastwood's spare and dark UNFORGIVEN. There are certainly many similarities in tone. But if anything, there is even less redemption available at the end of this Australian western than at the end of that Oscar winner.

Simply put, Ray Winstone plays the equivalent of the "new sheriff" in a very small, dreary dusty "western" town in Australia. The worst bandits in his area, the Burns brothers, are his primary goal, and when he corners and captures the two youngest brothers, Mickey and Charley (Guy Pearce), he offers Charley a proposition. He and his simple younger brother will be released if Charley goes out and kills his psychopathic older brother Arthur. If not, Mickey will be hung on Christmas Day, a few days away.

The fallout from this simple proposition is bleak, bleak, bleak. The film is slow moving and takes time to establish tone and to let us savor the unbelievable Australian scenery. As John Hurt (as a bounty hunter) says, it's the most horrific place he's ever been. The scenery is beautiful (sunsets, colorful rocks) and brutal...long expanses of sand and scruff. But the slow pace is punctuated with moments of extremely graphic violence. Each bullet hole or knife wound (or spear wound) is painful to watch. I'm not sure when I last saw a movie that made violence appear so unpleasant, so painful and so ugly.

Everyone in the film is great. Guy Pearce...exceedingly grubby...is torn between deciding how to deal with one of his brothers inevitably dieing. Ray Winstone gives a rich performance...just when we think we've got this guy figured out, he shows another layer. And then another. He wins our sympathy finally. Emily Watson is his wife, and her performance is a litle colorless...
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24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By B. Merritt VINE VOICE on September 25, 2006
Format: DVD
Historically, and from a character perspective, there's still mining to be done in western films, and THE PROPOSITION gives us a great sense of both. Aussie director John Hillcoat delves into Australia in the 1880s, telling about the bloody lawlessness and aboriginal prejudices.

The story centers around the outlaw Burns brothers, Charlie (Guy Pearce, L.A. CONFIDENTIAL), Mike (DECK DOGZ) and Arthur (Danny Huston, THE CONSTANT GARDNER). When Charlie and Mike are caught by local lawman Captain Stanley (Ray Winstone, COLD MOUNTAIN), Charlie is pulled aside and given a distasteful proposition: kill your brother Arthur and Mike will live. Charlie loves Mike dearly and hardly knows his other brother, Arthur. He grudgingly accepts the terms but it quickly becomes clear that he's unsure what to do. Is the killing of one family member in order to save another morally apprehensible? What if your moral boundaries are skewed?

Charlie rides off to find his brother in the searing Australian Outback.

Meanwhile, back in town, Captain Stanley is having great difficulty controlling its citizens once they learn one of the dreaded Burns brothers is in the local jail. A powerful bureaucrat named Eden Fletcher (David Wenham, THE LORD OF THE RINGS) demands swift justice. He orders that Mike Burns be lashed 100 times. Knowing that Mike probably won't survive this, but also battling feelings his lovely wife Martha (Emily Watson, GOSFORD PARK) has about the crimes Mike has committed, Captain Stanley is forced to give in to the township's demands.

Back in the Outback, Charlie finally runs into his twisted brother and comes face-to-face with his worst fears: killing someone of his own flesh and blood. Can he do it? Should he do it?
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Two DVDs?
They're both US versions, and as far as I know they both contain the same disc. The difference is, the full color one with Guy Pearce on horseback is in a standard plastic case, while the one that features the gold/black image of Guy's face with a gun is a Steelbook edition (in a metal DVD... Read More
Aug 25, 2008 by Alex Faber |  See all 2 posts
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