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Protecting Your Internet Identity: Are You Naked Online? Paperback – April 16, 2012

ISBN-13: 978-1442212206 ISBN-10: 1442212209

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 232 pages
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers (April 16, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1442212209
  • ISBN-13: 978-1442212206
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #645,162 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Claypoole and Payton address. . . broadly how to take charge of your online image. They provide extensive advice, beginning with a process of self-examination: do an Internet search for yourself and see what you find. How do you come across on your friends’ social networking pages? What images of yourself can you find online? What you would make of all this information if it were somebody else’s? The authors then give practical advice on how to tailor your online persona to reflect how you want to appear: what you can change, and what you cannot, how to promote that desired persona in search engine results and demote the bad bits you can’t fix. There is even advice on how to be anonymous online. . . Packed full of useful tips, telling examples and surprising highlights, this is an excellent book that addresses important issues on online privacy in an easily accessible way. (Online Information Review)

Helps readers understand the implications of online identities and how people may put themselves at risk professionally and personally. (Grand Forks [Sd] Herald)

Are You Naked Online? The answer is 'yes' and fortunately, there is a new book that walks you through the internet, step-by-step, and shows you how to reclaim your privacy and security while presenting a positive image. The book explains who is peeking at you online, why they look, and offers practical solutions for internet users and digital device-lovers of any age. A must-have for kids and adults alike, whether you spend an hour or hundreds of hours each month connected to the world through the internet. (Sue Scheff, author of Wit's End, co-author of Google Bomb, and Founder of Parents' Universal Resource Experts)

Do not spend another minute online until you read Protecting Your Internet Identity: Are You Naked Online? The advice is wise, timely and crucial for today's plugged-in world where the lines of privacy are blurred and the wrong click could mean horrific, lifetime consequences. The section, "Don't Forget the Kids" should be required reading for every parent - no excuses - parenting must be both off and ON the net. (Michele Borba, Ed.D., Child Media Expert, Educational Psychologist, and author of The Big Book of Parenting Solutions)

Over the course of just a few years, the Internet has morphed from a handy collective knowledge resource tool into an integral life-management system, redefining all notions of control where identity management is concerned. In this grand social experiment, online innovation has far outpaced awareness and the advent of legal and regulatory protections. Individuals have only recently begun to contemplate the long-term impact of online behaviors and the importance of managing one’s digital identity, while corporate and criminal interests have quickly adopted strategies and technologies that work to undermine consumer security and privacy. Even the most savvy of users routinely place themselves in peril while operating under faulty assumptions or with a detrimental lack of understanding in conducting personal and business related activities online. Protecting Your Identity: Are You Naked Online? by Ted Claypoole and Theresa Payton offers readers the opportunity to better understand the prerequisite fundamentals essential for successfully and safely navigating the rapidly evolving cybersphere. The material is presented in simple, non-technical language that is readily accessible to Internet users of all ages and aptitudes, and should be considered mandatory study for anyone who is thinking about, or has already taken the plunge, into the virtual domain. (Antony M. Freed, Managing Editor at Infosec Island)

An absolute must-read for any individual or parent who is, or who has, a computer in their home or a cell phone in their child's hand. (Mary Kay Hoal, Founder, President Yoursphere.com and YoursphereForParents.com)

About the Author

Ted Claypoole is an attorney and is currently co-chair of the Cyberspace Privacy and Data Security Subcommittee for the American Bar Association’s Business Law Section. Ted is the author of chapters in published books on biometrics and data security, as well as several articles on Internet security and Internet law. He is currently leader of the Privacy and Data Management team at the law firm Womble Carlyle. He leads data breach incident response teams in the financial, information processing, retail, and software industries. Ted consults on information security, privacy, consumer data treatment, and contingency planning matters, and advises clients on strategic technology and marketing alliances. Ted was previously the in-house technology and Internet counsel for CompuServe and Bank of America.
Theresa Payton is the Chief Advisor and CEO of Fortalice®, LLC, and former White House Chief Information Officer (CIO) of the Executive Office of the President (EOP) from 2006-2008. She was the first woman to hold this position, and currently holds a Top Secret Clearance. Theresa currently delivers security, risk, and fraud consulting services to private and public organizations. In addition to working with key clients in the private and public sector, Theresa is also Emeritus Faculty for the Security Executive Council and hosts a weekly segment on Charlotte, North Carolina’s WBTV called “Protecting Your Cyberturf” targeted at helping viewers stay safer online. Theresa started her career in banking in 1990 and was in the industry until 2006. She was named one of the top 25 “Most Influential People in Security” for 2010 by Security Magazine for her tireless efforts.

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Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
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Well written and very helpful.
Semper-Fi
I think I'd be an Internet lockdown nazi (and Claypoole and Payton tell you how!)
Erin Payton
AND if you have a teenager or middle schooler...buy this book.
Joan M Tomeu

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book does a fantastic job of explaining the reality of our online privacy - that it barely exists - and showing people how they are being spied upon by numerous entities for various reasons.

Most of the advice and explanations are directed at beginners and while the authors do a good job of explaining why your privacy is being invaded and how it affects you, they don't delve too deep into the technical details and sophisticated users may find the content leaving a little to be desired. That's OK, no book is perfect for everyone.

This book could definitely use an update. Several of the recommended tools and services are no longer available or in business, but I guess that is what happens when a book on a subject like this gets to be >20 months old.

I found it extremely amusing that the forward by the Former FBI Assistant Director assured readers that there is no government database collecting our information. This was obviously published before the recent Snowden leaks and doesn't address dealing with our government spying on us.

In the end, this book has some fantastic material for understanding online privacy, tips for tweaking your online image, and advice teaching children about online personas, but it definitely needs an update to address many of the new concerns that have arisen in recent months.

If you are looking for more up-to-date privacy tools, you should look at Incognito Toolkit - Tools, Apps, and Creative Methods for Remaining Anonymous, Private, and Secure While Communicating, Publishing, Buying, and Researching Online
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Erin Payton on July 15, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
Before I picked up this book, I felt like I knew a lot of the subject matter--I mean, I'm an academic librarian, I work with information (and the Internet) every day, and I'm regularly telling students the importance of choosing and evaluating the right online sources for their papers. But in the past year, I've had a variety of experiences that make this book uber-relevant: finding undesirable information about someone on the Internet by simply searching their name, having my Facebook account and email get hacked, hearing countless stories of businesses pass over young graduates because of things they've shared on their (open) Facebook page, and being able to, with just a little clicking, find someone's entire digital life including photos of their children and their spouse that shouldn't have been so easy for me to access (via Picasa and a wide-open Facebook account). And I myself have a very active "digital life": I post on my blog, I write reviews on Amazon, Goodreads, and Yelp, I'm active on Facebook daily--the online environment is a place where I'm very comfortable "living" (although I knew someone who ended up closing his Facebook account while going through his divorce because he didn't want any information to possibly get leaked to her, and he was almost horrified by the amount and types of information people revealed about themselves on FB, including me. And yet--he posted reviews on Yelp. Pot? Meet your kettle.)

It seems day after day we give up tiny bits of privacy for convenience, things we would never do if we could see the "online paparazzi" stalking us, involved in our business with our own eyes. But because it's online, we share all KINDS of information--credit card data, personal information, personal stories, etc.--and don't even give it a second thought.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Joan M Tomeu on June 19, 2012
Format: Paperback
I was not even half way into this book when I stopped and ordered multiple copies...for my CEO, my employees and each of my children. This is a book for those of us that use the internet for social networking and most importantly OUR businesses. It is clear, precise and easily understood; the sites listed are easy to navigate and information recommended to safely create an internet identity is priceless. My copy is highlighted, tabbed and has become an important resource for me. AND if you have a teenager or middle schooler...buy this book. Guide them and help them learn to protect their internet persona.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A. Pratt on February 2, 2013
Format: Paperback
Most of us spend a great deal of time online, whether conducting research for our jobs or connecting with friends and family on our social media sites. But let's be honest, how often do you think about protecting your online identity? Unless you live and breathe in the infosecurity arena, the reality is, you probably don't spend a lot of time thinking about your online privacy, let alone worrying about it. But by the end of this post, believe me, you'll think differently.

Ted Claypoole, an attorney and co-chair of the Cyberspace Privacy and Data Security Subcommittee of the American Bar Association's Business Law Section, and Theresa Payton, a security advisor and CEO of Fortalice, LLC, have written a must-read book entitled, "Are You Naked Online? Protecting You Internet Identity."

The book emphasizes the theme that "some aspects of our lives should not be shared with everyone...and you should have control over what you share and how you share it." However, that is easier said than done.

For family and friends who don't think about security on a daily basis, Claypoole and Payton provide an easy-to-understand explanation. Consider being at an airport in our post-9/11 world. Now, we all must walk through an X-ray machine. We feel exposed - but that is nothing when compared to how exposed we can feel as a result of the Internet.

So, instead of being naked online, make the conscious decision to be dressed when using the Internet. Keep important and confidential information offline. Use that famous rule: don't post anything that your grandmother or boss shouldn't see - that means credit card numbers, plans for when you will be away from home on a vacation, or photos from a late-night party when you might have had too much to drink.
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