Protection

January 24, 1995 | Format: MP3

$7.99
Song Title Artist
Time
Popularity  
30
1
7:51
30
2
5:16
30
3
3:49
30
4
5:00
30
5
5:21
30
6
4:13
30
7
5:11
30
8
5:24
30
9
3:39
30
10
3:15


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: January 24, 1995
  • Release Date: January 24, 1995
  • Label: Circa
  • Copyright: (C) 1994 Virgin Records LtdThis label copy information is the subject of copyright protection. All rights reserved.(C) 1994 Virgin Records Ltd
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 48:59
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000TEVJYS
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (100 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,157 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

It is well produced and quite sophisticated.
Dr Jeremy Buddle
So when 'Karmacoma' ended I was preparing myself hearing really crappy and lame music.
Max Pax
Save for those two tracks, this album is quite good.
G. Smith

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Adam Carroll on August 12, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Massive Attack corral together assorted vocalists and guest artists to form their 1994 effort Protection, and the mix of styles makes this album really shine. The CD starts off with the noted single "Protection," featuring the rich voice of Tracey Thorn. Other songs incorporate the vocals of Tricky, Nicolette, and Horace Andy (as well as Massive's own 3-d). While the vocalists' differing styles lend themselves to different types of songs, a laid-back tempo and strong bass - guaranteed to satisfy the rhythm lover in you - unify the 10 songs on Protection. The two instrumental pieces, the jazzy "Weather Storm" and the mysterious "Heat Miser," reinforce this theme. Bottom line: Protection is a solid, powerful, aptly titled release. Curl up on a winter's night and let this album warm you.
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23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Gillian L. Rosheuvel on September 26, 2002
Format: Audio CD
This album is often derided as the only misstep in the distinguished career of Massive Attack. True, it is not as immediate as "Blue Lines" or as coherent as "Mezzanine", but "Protection" has an allure all its own. That the songs don't seem to fit together is part of the album's charm and appeal. Tracy Thorn kicks off the festivities with the epic title track, giving voice to one of the most poignant and evocative love (or is it anti-love) songs ever recorded. As is always the case with MA, the production is stellar and a harbinger of things to come (Thorn also turns up on the pleasant, but bland "Better Things"). 3-D and a pre-solo career Tricky share rapping duties on the harrowing "Karmacoma", a stark, head nodding blend of rap and reggae. Billie Holliday sound alike, Nicolette takes over vocals on "Three", seamlessly navigating the song's watery groove. Scottish composer/producer Craig Armstrong makes the first of three appearances on this album with "Weather Storm". It's not MA's strongest track, but it succeeds in creating a late night, quiet storm vibe. Elsewhere, Armstrong, conducts the strings on the amazing "Sly" (a Jungian tale sung with appropriate mysticism and mystery by Nicolette); and tickles the ivories on the new agish "Heat Miser". Tricky and 3-D return to the mic on the sleek, city song "Eurochild". MA regular Horace Andy appears on the sinewy "Spying Glass" (a reworking of his own tune "Spy Glass"), and the album closing live cover of the Doors' "Light My Fire". In both instances, his vocal stylings are a perfect compliment to MA's reggae-oriented dance jams. Following up a masterpiece like "Blue Lines" was always going to be tricky (no pun intended); but with the all-over-the-map "Protection", MA managed to move forward without sacrificing any of their originality or spirit.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Erica Anderson on April 5, 2002
Format: Audio CD
I love Massive Attack. Their music is dark and foreboding. "Blue Lines" introduced the world to Tricky as well as established itself as a timeless classic. "Mezzanine" really brought trip hop to the forefront on the US music scene. In between "Blue Lines" and "Mezzanine" is "Protection". "Protection" is an underlooked and underrated album filled with some of my personal favorite songs from the talented UK trip hop group. I loved the title track from the moment I first saw the music video for the song on MTV pre-TRL. "Protection" is simply classic Tracey Thorn. Her vocals just makes me melt. There is something about her voice that I find comforting and reassuring. She does an outstanding job on this song. I immediately fell in love with "Karmacoma" within a matter of seconds. I love hearing the group's reggae influences ring out through the entire song. "Weather Storm" is a gorgeous instrumental. I could hear Craig Armstrong's influence throughout the entire track. Just a beautiful song that will haunt me for years to come. The production of this album is as raw as "Blue Lines" and "Mezzanine", maybe even more so (in my opinion). Their cover of The Door's "Light My Fire" is quite compelling and unique. Is it better than the original? I diddn't think so but it is just as good. After listening to "Protection", I have to say this album has to be my personal favorite of the three Massive Attack albums that I own (at least until the new album comes out).
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 16, 2000
Format: Audio CD
wow. Wow. WOW.
i totally loved 'blue lines'. i've been a huge fan of everything but the girl since the mid 80s. and by adding tracey thorn's vocals into an already potent mix that created 'blue lines', this album was on constant repeat in my cd player.
though strengthened by thorn and collaborator ben watt's contribution on the title track and 'better things', this sophomore effort is lyrically weaker than the debut. but the hypnotic beats from 'blue lines' carried over into this one. even alanis morisette said that 'protection' was incredibly soothing and strangely uplifting when she heard it at the vma after party.
the great thing about this album is it starts by grabbing you and doesn't let go until the second last track.
'protection' wraps thorn's vocals around you, feeling strong yet vulnerable at the same time. the beat elevates your senses and you feel lightened somehow.
'karmacoma' hits you from the first beat, tricky and 3d hypnotises you with their 'rapping' (for want a better word); 'three' breaks this stupor, with vocalist nicolette tip-toeing playfully around 'her favourite number'. orgasmic!
'weather storm' surprises you with a simple bass track and elegently haunting piano work by craig armstrong, raining down on your emotions after the last 3 tracks.
'spying glass' goes back to the dark playfulness of 'three', again to incredible effect.
track 6 'better things' finds thorn back on vocals, accusational and angry... blending perfectly into the instrumental confection built around her voice.
'eurochild' has 3d and tricky again talking around very textured beats.
and 'sly' is just incredible... nicolette taking us on her journey... wondering...
Read more ›
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