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Providence


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Product Details

  • Actors: John Gielgud, Dirk Bogarde, Ellen Burstyn
  • Directors: Alain Resnais
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0001P1UF8
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #529,884 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 31, 2002
Format: VHS Tape
An oldie but goodie (1969). This film has been one of my favorites since presenting it via a film society 22 years ago. That audience seemed to enjoy it as well.
This unique film possesses some of the most alive English language dialogue to ever hit the screen. Incorporated within the stream of consciousness visuals of master French director Alain Resnais (his first work in English), this film, written by playwright David Mercer, delivers the audience into the mind of a dying and somewhat bitter author (Sir John Gielgud) as he attempts to write one last work of fiction through a painful and sleepless night of rectal pain, albeit increasingly under the influence of an alcoholic beverage. As his minds clouds, his script becomes confused, often with comedic effect.
While sad, bitter sweet, moving and often serious, this film possesses wonderful humor. The recurring images of the "famous footballer" (David Warner), Ellen Burstyn's slicing of a phallic-shaped vegetable while accusing her husband of infidelity and the delivery of Dirk Bogard's pithy lines all conspire to amuse even the most jaded moviegoer. If you don't like a certain scene, be patient, the director/author will take another whack at it - usually with a subtle visual twist.
This is one film worth watching more than once. In fact, you will want to watch it more than once to see what you missed previously.
This masterwork seriously deserves to be re-released as a DVD.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By "kccoates" on October 31, 2002
Format: VHS Tape
An oldie but goodie (1969). This film has been one of my favorites since presenting it via a film society 22 years ago. That audience seemed to enjoy it as well.
This unique film possesses some of the most alive English language dialogue to ever hit the screen. Incorporated within the stream of consciousness visuals of master French director Alain Resnais (his first work in English), this film, written by playwright David Mercer, delivers the audience into the mind of a dying and somewhat bitter author (Sir John Gielgud) as he attempts to write one last work of fiction through a painful and sleepless night of rectal pain, albeit increasingly under the influence of an alcoholic beverage. As his minds clouds, his script becomes confused, often with comedic effect.
While sad, bitter sweet, moving and often serious, this film possesses wonderful humor. The recurring images of the "famous footballer" (David Warner), Ellen Burstyn's slicing of a phallic-shaped vegetable while accusing her husband of infidelity and the delivery of Dirk Bogard's pithy lines all conspire to amuse even the most jaded moviegoer. If you don't like a certain scene, be patient, the director/author will take another whack at it - usually with a subtle visual twist.
This is one film worth watching more than once. In fact, you will want to watch it more than once to see what you missed previously.
This masterwork seriously deserves to be re-released as a DVD.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Tim Idsole on April 12, 2003
Format: VHS Tape
This is, to my mind, one of the four or five best films of the seventies, and one that continues to give pleasure and inspiration. It's a shame that it isn't better known in the US, and scandalous that it hasn't been issued on DVD.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Lee Higgs on July 26, 2005
Format: VHS Tape
Many filmmakers and critics consider this to be the best film of its time. Not only are the performances brilliant, but a great deal can be learned about the language and mechanics of cinema by watching this movie very carefully. You will learn something new every time. Now if only they would make a good DVD!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By P. L. McNamara on May 23, 2011
Format: VHS Tape
This intellectually intriguing, deeply probing, brilliantly acted film deserves recognition as a classic. Instead it lies neglected by self-styled film critics, unavailable on DVD (except in PAL format), and known only to the lucky few who saw it in circulation in the '70s. Why the Criterion Collection, or another restoration house, hasn't reissued "Providence" baffles me. With all the flashy, trashy films on DVD, surely there's room for this Alain Resnais masterpiece, with great performances by Gielgud, Bogarde, Burstyn, Warner, and Stritch!
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