Providence & Prayer: How Does God Work in the World? and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$23.63
Qty:1
  • List Price: $32.00
  • Save: $8.37 (26%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Providence & Prayer : How Does God Work in the World? Paperback – April 26, 2000


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$23.63
$18.88 $2.80

Frequently Bought Together

Providence & Prayer : How Does God Work in the World? + The Deep Things of God: How the Trinity Changes Everything
Price for both: $37.89

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: IVP Academic (April 26, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0830815783
  • ISBN-13: 978-0830815784
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 5.9 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #602,757 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Terrance Tiessen is professor of theology and ethics at Providence Theological Seminary, Otterburne, Manitoba, and is the author of Irenaeus and the Salvation of the Unevangelized.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By MARVIN M. HEWLETT, JR. on June 26, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The subjects of free will, human responsibility, determinism, foreknowledge, divine sovereignty, election, providence, and prayer are puzzle pieces that are extremely difficult to assemble into a logically consistent theological worldview. Attempts to resolve the difficulties associated with these subjects have led to the variety of positions presented in Part I of Terrance Tiessen's Providence & Prayer. Oftentimes, for Calvinists (like me), prayer winds up being the neglected stepchild. After all, God is sovereign and knows the future so it's easy to become resigned to a sort of fatalism. Prayers go unanswered because a sovereign God knows best and is working his plan. Conversely, we receive wonderful and sometimes unexpected blessings which were not prayed for because - a sovereign God knows best and is working his plan. Does prayer make any difference? Can it make any difference? Can we change God's mind? People who have thought deeply about these issues know the conundrum. Part of Tiessen's attempt at resolving these questions is something called middle knowledge.

When I first encountered the concept of middle knowledge in Craig & Moreland's Philosophical Foundations for a Christian Worldview, I found it confusing and further research led me to Providence & Prayer. I wish I could give the book more than five stars, not just for the content, but also for the author's artful and thorough presentation. Tiessen introduces a case study (involving prayers for three kidnapped missionaries) and presents a model prayer representing a different theological view point at the end of each chapter.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Renea McKenzie on May 1, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Tiessen, a professor of systematic theology and ethics at Providence College and Seminary, wrote this book because he noticed a consistent trend among his students. They write essays on God's providence that suggest one system of belief, but pray in class in a way that is inconsistent.

Providence and Prayer reads left to right as Tiessen expounds on several models of providence starting with Neo-Deism and finishing with Calvinism. Each chapter begins with the basics of the view, moves to how this particular view understands the role and value prayer, and ends with the same case study used throughout the book. The case study involves a large prayer group which includes people who hold to each understanding of providence. One of the members asks prayer for his missionary son whose recently been kidnapped by local gorilla terrorists. The others offer prayer consistent with their particular view of how God works in the world.

I liked this book. It's good and obviously thought-provoking. I think it is important to try to be consistent, to bridge gaps between our theology and our practice. But even after reading this detailed text, I still can't manage to wrap my mind around providence and free will... After each chapter I kept finding myself saying, 'Yeah, but...' In the end, I kept coming back to the fact that mystery is essential in God's economy. Complete systematized theology is impossible, and systematized theology at the cost of mystery is a dead theology. That doesn't mean this book isn't worth reading; it is. So, check it out and see what you think.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Linda M. Mccray on October 23, 2005
Format: Paperback
This book gave me much insight into how and why there are so many notions of how God involves Himself in our lives through the process we call "prayer". I was turned onto this book from a professor teaching on post-modernism in the church and am also using it for a Sunday School Adult class on Approaching God Through Prayer. It is extremely helpful and was useful in enlightening why I think and pray the way I do...as well as clearly explaining other points of view. Mainly, though, God just wants us to talk to Him. He probably thinks it is funny that we go to all this trouble to explain ourselves to each other.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?