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Proving You're Qualified: Strategies for Competent People Without College Degrees Paperback – June 1, 1995


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 166 pages
  • Publisher: Autodidactic Press; 1 edition (June 1, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9621979129
  • ISBN-13: 978-9621979124
  • ASIN: 0962197912
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 5.9 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,052,224 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

How can people without college degrees prove competency and overcome common barriers to job advancement and success? Don't let missing, often arbitrary, credentials hold you down: Hayes provides a program of demonstrating competence in the workplace, emphasizing basic understanding of management systems and company politics in the process of making one's worth known to the right people in an organization. An unusual, excellent approach to ensuring job security. --Midwest Book Review

Proving You're Qualified is like a mystery novel. I couldn't put it down. It's a page turner so compelling you feel forced to write comments on the side of the pages as you go along. If you would like to have the confidence of a guide who has been there, and who can show the way to realize closure, this may be the most important book you ever read. -- James R. Fisher, Jr., Ph.D., author of The Worker Alone! Going Against The Grain and Work Without Managers: A View From The Trenches.

For more than twenty years, I have been writing about the disparity between learning and credentials. I show people with skills but no credentials how to earn the degree that will open doors for them. Now comes the perfect complement to that work. Charles Hayes' wonderful Proving You're Qualified , shows people with skills but few credentials how to parlay their skills into employment and acceptance without benefit of degrees. -- John Bear, Ph.D., author of Bear's Guide To Non-Traditional College Degrees

From the Publisher

What Others Are Saying About Proving You're Qualified

"Proving You're Qualified is like a mystery novel. I couldn't put it down. It's a page turner so compelling you feel forced to write comments on the side of the pages as you go along. If you would like to have the confidence of a guide who has been there, and who can show the way to realize closure, this may be the most important book you ever read."

James R. Fisher, Jr., Ph.D., author of The Worker Alone! Going Against The Grain and Work Without Managers: A View From The Trenches.

"For more than twenty years, I have been writing about the disparity between learning and credentials. I show people with skills but no credentials how to earn the degree that will open doors for them. Now comes the perfect complement to that work. Charles Hayes' wonderful Proving You're Qualified, shows people with skills but few credentials how to parlay their skills into employment and acceptance without benefit of degrees."

John Bear, Ph.D., author of Bear's Guide To Non- Traditional College Degrees.

"A superb editorial analysis of a basic part of an aging educational system that needs some radical changes. This book should be studied by all of those who accept responsibility as facilitators, assessors or credentialers of learning."

Urban Whitaker, Ph.D., author of Assessing Learning: Standards, Principles and Procedures.

"This is the wisest and most useful book I have ever read on this subject. Anyone smart enough to have gained knowledge and skills on their own will be able to get recognition and advancement using the powerful strategies offered by Charles Hayes." Ronald Gross, author of Peak Learning and The Independent Scholar's Handbook.

"Deserves a place on the sociology shelf." Library Journal

"An unusual, excellent approach to ensuring job security." The Bookwatch


More About the Author

Charles D. Hayes is a self-taught philosopher and one of America's strongest advocates for lifelong learning. He spent his youth in Texas and served as a U.S. Marine and as a police officer before embarking on a career in the oil industry. Alaska has been his home for more than forty years.

Promoting the idea that education should be thought of not as something you get but as something you take, Hayes' work has been featured in The L.A. Progressive, USA Today, and the UTNE Reader, on National Public Radio's Talk of the Nation and on Alaska Public Radio's Talk of Alaska.

Praised for his remarkable depth of knowledge across numerous disciplines, Hayes affirms through his work that active, continuous learning is what makes life worthwhile. His books encourage the kind of thinking that can transform human relations on a global scale, urging us to continuously examine our values, motivations, and common beliefs. He inspires us to acknowledge our mortality and live authentically as a result, taking deliberate action to leave the world a better place than we found it.

"The temporary nature of our lives may be a reason for unavoidable despair," says Hayes, "but such is the price of intelligence--it doesn't render our lives meaningless. To the contrary, the opportunity to live a life as a human being makes us the most fortunate creatures on the planet. We should be experts at being human and creating a world where humans can thrive."

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Lee Say Keng on August 20, 2006
Format: Paperback
In the realm of many books covering self-directed learning, I would like to single out two books which I have read on this subject.

They are:

- Self University: The Price of Tuition is the Desire to Learn, by Charles Hayes;
- Proving You're Qualified: Strategies for Competent People without College Degrees, by Charles Hayles;

After having spent twenty-four years in the corporate world, I really consider them to be the wisest & most useful books I have ever read on the subject of self-directed learning.

'Self-University' is a heart-warming book. It encourages all of us to think of education as a life-long, self-initiated venture instead of a lifeless, institutionalized affair.

Let me recap the author's catchy metaphor from this book: "The caterpillar is condemned to crawl, but the butterfly has the potential to soar above with an all-inclusive view of the world. As humans we complete our caterpillar stage when we reach mature physical growth. If we are to soar like the butterflies, we must do so through the development of our minds."

'Proving You're Qualified' is a career book for competent people who have learned their jobs, on the job...& yet they are often passed over for promotion for lack of a degree, which has nothing, whatsoever, to do with their performance. This book offers readers a frank discussion of educational merit and actual performance in a workplace caught in the grip of frightening change. It can help you to better understand the nature of power in hierarchies, to gain insight into methods for fighting credentialism, and to save time and money by utilizing alternate methods of adult continuing education.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 26, 1999
Format: Paperback
In this work, Hayes examines the world of academia and the credentials it confers through the eyes of the working person. Hayes references personal experience, philosophical wisdom, and pure common sense to form a work that, if nothing else, will challenge the reader's view of the credentialing process and stimulate one's thoughts. A valuable read for anyone, credentialed or not.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Gian Fiero on January 2, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm a big fan of Charles D. Hayes. Not only are his books well-written, but his arguments for self-knowledge and self-education are eloquently framed. His opinions are largely based upon independently conducted research which includes a seemingly endless list of books that he's read, his work experiences, and sincerity of thought. With that in mind, I'd have to say that I highly recommend this book for those who may not have a degree, but are struggling with the decision of whether or not pursue one to get a job, or to advance your career. That dilemma is at the center of this wheel, and the related issues of practicality, necessity, self-perception, corporate culture, etc., are the spokes that surround it.

Does the book offer strategies for competent people without college degrees? Sort of. Charles has some suggestions, but ultimately, he has a great deal of provocations that can stimulate the type of thinking that will lead to the creation of the very strategies that you are hoping to find herein.

This book succeeds on many levels, none more importantly perhaps, than in bringing this topic to the table for examination and discussion. Competency versus credentials is a great debate; one that needs more attention - especially if you lack the latter. This book will improve your chances of winning that argument the next time it arises.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Allen Laudenslager on June 16, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I was disappointed since there is very little about how to prove you are qualified. Lost of time spent defining the problem but no advice on getting your experiential qualifications past the gatekeepers in HR or accepted by the hiring managers. Seemed more like a rant about the problem with footnotes. On the whole I wish I'd save the price of the book.
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For practically minded workers---those with an eye on production and delivering sterling value---the situation today is rich with promise. Employers are waking up to the truth that University degrees---even those from prestigious universities---are as good as counterfeit. Just one reason is that, today, anyone can go to university. And many graduates don't even have a firm grasp of the language in which their years of coursework was conducted. Here in Australia that language is English, of course, and the number of "English-impaired" students graduating from prestigious Australian Universities has been a big question mark. And it doesn't stop there; I've found university coursework that was outdated, riddled with errors and learning material that I could not map to actual workplace skills.
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I once came across a text book (in use at a prestigious university) which was written in unnecessarily complicated and twisted sentences; so much so that it would make the professors who wrote it laughing stocks in international academic circles.
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The remarks of other reviewers so far---"Lee Say Keng", "'A Customer' [on August 26, 1999]" and "Gian Fiero"---are well-worth reading, and I shall not repeat those same praises here.
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To summarize, I should say simply that this book is a good starting point. Internet based facilities (not available in 1995 when this book was published) can now be leveraged in adapting the strategies covered in this book.
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Good luck! But better still, "good strategy"!
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