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Psalms I 1-50 (The Anchor Yale Bible Commentaries) Paperback – March 1, 1995


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Psalms I 1-50 (The Anchor Yale Bible Commentaries) + Psalms II 51-100 (The Anchor Yale Bible Commentaries) + Psalms III 101-150 (The Anchor Yale Bible Commentaries)
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Product Details

  • Series: The Anchor Yale Bible Commentaries
  • Paperback: 380 pages
  • Publisher: Yale University Press; Reprint edition (March 1, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 030013956X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0300139563
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,795,816 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

This is Volume 16 of The Anchor Bible, a new book-by-book translation of the Bible, each complete with an introduction and notes. Psalms I (1-50) is translated and edited by Mitchell Dahood, S.J., Professor of Ugaritic Language and Literature at The Pontifical Biblical Institute in Rome.

With Psalms, any new translation will be considered in the context of the literary achievement of the King James Version, and in the light of more recent renderings. A word of explanation is, therefore, appropriate.

"The translation offered here," Father Dahood writes, "differs from earlier efforts in that it is not the fruit of a confrontation of the Hebrew text with the ancient versions, from which the least objectionable reading is plucked." Rather, from a close examination of the original text, a unique translation has been attempted, one which relies heavily on contemporary linguistic evidence. It is a translation "accompanied by philological commentary, that lays heavy stress on the Ras-Shamra texts and other epigraphic discoveries made along the Phoenician littoral," a translation prepared in direct response to W.F. Albright's statement (made a quarter of a century ago) "that all future investigations of the book of Psalms must deal intensively with the Ugaritic texts."

This translation tries to capture as much as possible the poetic qualities of the original Hebrew. Its attempt is to render accurately not only the meaning of the Psalms but their poetic forms and rhythms as well. In this process of probing the original, Father Dahood unearths some striking examples of passages previously mistranslated, and arrives at many provocative readings. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Inside Flap

This is Volume 16 of The Anchor Bible, a new book-by-book translation of the Bible, each complete with an introduction and notes. Psalms I (1-50) is translated and edited by Mitchell Dahood, S.J., Professor of Ugaritic Language and Literature at The Pontifical Biblical Institute in Rome.

With Psalms, any new translation will be considered in the context of the literary achievement of the King James Version, and in the light of more recent renderings. A word of explanation is, therefore, appropriate.

"The translation offered here," Father Dahood writes, "differs from earlier efforts in that it is not the fruit of a confrontation of the Hebrew text with the ancient versions, from which the least objectionable reading is plucked." Rather, from a close examination of the original text, a unique translation has been attempted, one which relies heavily on contemporary linguistic evidence. It is a translation "accompanied by philological commentary, that lays heavy stress on the Ras-Shamra texts and other epigraphic discoveries made along the Phoenician littoral," a translation prepared in direct response to W.F. Albright's statement (made a quarter of a century ago) "that all future investigations of the book of Psalms must deal intensively with the Ugaritic texts."

This translation tries to capture as much as possible the poetic qualities of the original Hebrew. Its attempt is to render accurately not only the meaning of the Psalms but their poetic forms and rhythms as well. In this process of probing the original, Father Dahood unearths some striking examples of passages previously mistranslated, and arrives at many provocative readings. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By R. Stander on August 12, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I would like to temper Olaf01 statements about Dahood's well known work. Dahood does work deeply into Semetic philology, and while this may bog down the non-academics, he offers an incredible wealth of wisdom from this perspective. Often I was simply struck by the depth of his variant translations and readings of individual Psalms. For me, this is a strong resource to use along side of many other quality texts as mentioned by Olaf01. Dahood's takes some great risks opening himself up for brilliance or criticism. Either way, it makes for exciting and insightful comparisons among the other seminal texts.
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24 of 32 people found the following review helpful By olaf01 on March 19, 2003
Format: Hardcover
This three volume commentary on the book of Psalms is in many ways the culmination of a lifetime of study in Semitic philology by one of the 20th century's most gifted and original semitists. However, Dahood's originality often took a commanding role over and against his training as a philologist. The commentary is essentially philological, and is of rather limited interest to the non-scholar; there are several other Psalms commentaries that would prove far more usefull to the interested non-scholar (Hans-Joachin Kraus's three volumes on the Psalms ["Theology of the Psalms", "Psalms 1-50", and "Psalms 51-150" published by Fortress Press] come to mind as a thoroughly academic, yet far more useful and usable commentary). In addition to Dahood focusing on nitty-gritty details of Northwest Semitic linguistics, there is the lamentable fact that he all too often grossly overstates the case of comparative linguistic data, and simply offers wholely implausible readings of biblical texts. One cannot help but think of Dahood's unfortunate publication of a text from the ancient city of Ebla, in which he claimed that it was a direct parallel to a passage in the book of Proverbs; as it turns out, the text in question was a butcher's list of different cuts of meat.
The material in this commentary is of interst to professional students of the Hebrew Bible, Hebrew language, and Semitic philology--all too often as a warning of what NOT to do. As a commentary of use to the layman, it should be avoided. The forthcoming commentary of Kselman should be a most welcome addition to Psalms scholarship.
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1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ibrahim on January 7, 2014
Format: Paperback
Suppose you're getting ready to do your daily devotions. You take Psalm 29 and you are using Dahood's commentary here and you will be happy to know where things came from. Oh yes, this psalm is a hymn that calls on us to acknowledge the Sovereignty of God. This psalm also is a Yahwistic adaptation of an older Caananite hymn to the storm-god Baal. What next? You keep reading and reading in this commentary and you discover it only gives you the anatomy of pslam, what is adapted from what, and that's all. Then you smile and put it back on the shelf for future quick reference, but it isn't the kind of commentary that bring you to your knees on prayer or adoration of God. Just anatomy book of Psalm for those who enjoy textual study and could use a book like that for a quick reference.
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