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Psionic Power: A 4th Edition D&D Supplement Hardcover – August 17, 2010


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Product Details

  • Series: 4th Edition D&D
  • Hardcover: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Wizards of the Coast (August 17, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0786955600
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786955602
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 0.5 x 11.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #383,816 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
5 star
57%
4 star
36%
3 star
0%
2 star
7%
1 star
0%
See all 14 customer reviews
They offer the best in mental might.
JohnG1701
It's a power source now just like Divine for Clerics or Arcane for Wizards.
PghDrake
In all, a solid book for 4th edition.
Jason Wills-Starin

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By William M. Wilson on August 25, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I'll be honest - I've never really loved psionics in any edition of D&D. In 1e, they were a confusing add-on, and its charts took up a lot of valuable DMG and DM Screen space. In 2e, they were pretty intensely broken. In 3e, they didn't work because of the crazy attribute requirements. In 3.5, they worked actually pretty well, but I didn't have too much interest.

In 4e, I still think the psionics system is flawed, but I'm slowly warming up to it. My concerns are mostly with the ability to spam low-level powers over and over again at high levels... Ardents and Psions both have powers at 1st level which are so good, I don't know why they'd ever trade them out, much less pay triple the points to enhance a higher-level power. Both the Ardent and the Battlemind seemed like space-filler classes - just psionic versions of Warlords and Fighters. The only one I really loved right from the outset is the monk.

Well, that's changed, after seeing some in play. I still have concerns re: those troublesome 1st-level powers; I still don't fully understand the logic behind upgrading your At-Wills; and I'm still thinking the power point system could have been much, much better. However, one of my players completely sold me on Ardents, and another impressed me with a Battlemind, so I'm warming to all of them. I see them as their own classes now, rather than psionic versions of the stuff we already have.

At any rate, this is quite a good splatbook. Like Primal Power, it has a large amount of flavor text; it's not all just powers, feats, and paragon paths. It gives you a better idea of what Ardents, Battleminds, Monks, and Psions do in the world - something pretty well missing from PHB3. Battleminds, despite all my expectations, are becoming one of my favorite classes.
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24 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Jason Wills-Starin on August 24, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Since play-testing the fourth edition core rule books, I've run the gamut with the 4th edition game. I loved it, I hated it, I felt nostalgia for the old system, I saw the brilliance of the balance and then I grumbled as the "splat books" tore the whole thing apart again. The Psionics books feels good.
Important notes:

1. The Battlemind is a solid class, but be prepared to have the same level of detail the core books granted the old classes. A Psionics Book 2 will probably come along, but the core class has some flexibility, especially if like me you plan on using this in DarkSun.

2. The Monk is a joy, but one of the weaker classes for Paragon paths. I felt the 6 paths were weak and failed to encompass the Eastern and Western flavors the Monk really could have diverged into. Basilisk's Fury Adept for example seems a focused one-off not really able to blend into any of the storybooks many players try to crib their system from. While the Monk like the Battlemind can flow nicely into a DarkSun game, there's no clean analog to the Drunken Master or Tattoo'd monk or even Sacred Fist that fit so well into some of the 3.5 campaigns. These paragon paths were the weakest portion of the book, but can be fixed with other material or creative campaign actions moving forward.

3. The Psion is a pure joy to read and I can't wait to see it in play. Unlike the Monk, the paragon paths have exciting role-play opportunities and bring out ranges from other classes from 3.5. My favorite is the Alienist, an absolute show winner for me and after careful examination, my favorite paragon class to date. Not because of power, but because of the care and craft used to insert it into this class and give it an honest home.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Richard Staats on July 5, 2011
Format: Hardcover
The purpose of a review is to help potential buyers decide whether to buy a product or not.

I love role-playing games, and I generally support Hasbro/Wizards of the Coast/TSR and their line of D&D products.

If you want to introduce psionics into your campaign then buy the Player's Handbook III (PHB III, 4th Edition).

The PHB III has 95%+ of the material you need to run a psionic character, and the PHB III has other material as well.

While the options presented in this book are balanced, thoughtful, etc. and all of the nice adjectives used in other reviews, for $30, this book adds little substance compared to the other D&D 4e. supplements. At the time I am writing this, the book is going for $20; it would probably be a reasonable buy at $10. So, if you see it on e-bay or in the discount rack for $10, pick it up.

Again, this is not a bad product, I would just spend my money on other Hasbro/WotC/TSR products (the PHB III) in particular.

In service,

Rich
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Lots of great information in here, not fully required to play of course as it's not one of necessary core books but it is very helpful. It's used in addition to the Players Handbook 3 - so if you don't have that you don't need this book.

I have a DDI (Dungeons and Dragons Insider) account which gives me all of the class and power information from this book, but it's still great to have the books themselves for a much higher level of detail about the classes and other information. I like to have an overabundance of reference material at my disposal and this book certainly does that.

There are new powers, feats, paragon/epic choices and other changes/additions to the classes listed that help you to expand your choices.

Psionics in 4e is nothing like it was before. It's a power source now just like Divine for Clerics or Arcane for Wizards. It's not additional powers over and above your current class - and I like this. I go way back with D&D, Psionics used to be over powered and balance-changing, where now it's nothing of the sort. I always liked the idea of powers-of-the-mind and with these two books you have it.

Very good resource, judge your level of necessity against your purchase though because it's not at all required. Just adds an additional level of options for your characters.

-D
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Psionic Power: A 4th Edition D&D Supplement
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