Psych Major Syndrome and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.99
  • Save: $2.26 (13%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by bookfinders
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Ex-library book in good condition with typical stamps and markings. Pages are clean and the binding is tight. *NOTE* Stock photo may not represent the actual book for sale.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Psych Major Syndrome Hardcover – August 11, 2009


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover, August 11, 2009
$14.73
$3.14 $0.01
Paperback
"Please retry"

100%20Children%27s%20Books%20to%20Read%20in%20a%20Lifetime


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Top 20 Books for Kids
See the books our editors' chose as the Best Children's Books of 2014 So Far or see the lists by age: Baby-2 | Ages 3-5 | Ages 6-8 | Ages 9-12 | Nonfiction

Product Details

  • Age Range: 12 - 18 years
  • Grade Level: 9 - 12
  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Hyperion Book CH (August 11, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1423114574
  • ISBN-13: 978-1423114574
  • Product Dimensions: 1.1 x 5.6 x 8.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,185,047 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 9 Up—Leigh, a freshman at tiny Stiles College in California, is more uptight than her artsy roommate Ami, but not quite as stiff as her high school boyfriend, Andrew. She's trying to figure out how to navigate her way through a psychology major at a school that's putting more pressure on her than she expected while weathering Andrew's expectations for sex though their romance is dwindling. Added into the mix are Andrew's attractive but moody roommate, several "mean girl" types, and a healthy dose of quirky, introspective humor. Leigh's exceptional vocabulary is naturally worked into the story, which is also heavily laced with brand and celebrity names, music references, and esoteric comments about zombies and girlfriends who might like to cook your bunny rabbit. The idea that Leigh's kooky parents (who own a psychic B&B) would have her share a bedroom at their home with a young man because they want to save space for paying guests seems far-fetched, as does a contrived subplot that features an overweight matron-type who is too rigid to talk with any honesty about sex. The young woman's ongoing inner conversations about sleeping with Andrew are much more believable.—Maggie Knapp, Trinity Valley School, Fort Worth, TX END

Review

Praise for

Psych Major Syndrome:

“You won’t be able to put this book down. I didn’t want it to end!”—Meg Cabot, internationally best-selling author of

The Princess Diaries and

Airhead

“A classic romantic-comedy formula feels fresh thanks to Leigh’s witty, semi-slacker narration, adorably kooky persona, and background.” —

Kirkus Reviews

--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
10
4 star
5
3 star
2
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 18 customer reviews
Thompson's writing is fresh, witty, quirky in all the right ways and utterly charming.
Disquietus
I really enjoyed this book; it's not very often I get to read a book about a college-age protagonist.
James F. Booth
All these characters are really well developed, and you grow to love them as the book progresses.
Runa

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Runa VINE VOICE on October 12, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Continuing a trend that seems to have been started by Megan McCafferty is another YA book set at college instead of the typical junior high/high school ones. This is really exciting for me as a new college student, watching my books grow up along side me and keeping the material relevant and interesting. It also really helped that the main character in the story goes to a tiny school that sounds very much like my own. Anyways, the plot was cute, if not annoyingly simple. Everything was pretty predictable, and it is no wonder that Meg Cabot blurbed it--it's such utterly Cabotian fluff, just as well-written in a casual conversational tone. I love it when authors do cute gimmicky things, so I was a fan of the little psych related definitions that came before chapters and symbolically related really nicely to whatever was happening. All these characters are really well developed, and you grow to love them as the book progresses. I was really satisfied with the way everything turned out at the end, after that emotional rollercoaster of suspense resolved itself. I was a little disappointed by the lack of very much to do with psychology, but it's still a cute book--just don't expect anything intellectual out of it.

Rating: 5/5

Also, cutest U2 references ever!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Disquietus on July 21, 2013
Format: Hardcover
I wish I had read this book before I did that Top Ten Tuesday post on authors who deserve more recognition because this book you guys. This book is a hidden gem that everybody should be reading. A fantastic cast of characters, fresh writing, and a swoon worthy romance? YES YES YES. Psych Major Syndrome is one of those rare books that just sang to my soul, from the moment I read the first sentence, the book I wish I'd had in my hands during my freshman year of college. It was so relatable and realistic and I never wanted it to end. The closer I got to finishing it, the more excuses I would find to stop reading and do something else because I wanted to live in Leigh's life for just a little bit longer.

Leigh is a freshman at a small liberal arts college, and Psych Major Syndrome details her journey during this pivotal year, where she learns how to balance new academic needs, new relationships, a preoccupation with sex, and all of the other changes that come with leaving home and being on your own for the first time. She's one of those characters I loved instantly, even more so because I could strongly relate to her, right down to her penchant for badly written romance novels. She's just so well-rounded and normal. She's smart and witty but she's also naive and blind to the obvious and has that tendency to over analyze every little thing that I think all girls can relate to. She brought out all the emotions that you want to feel when reading. I cried with her and laughed with her and of course had moments when I wanted to strangle her for being oblivious or stubborn.

Thompson's writing is fresh, witty, quirky in all the right ways and utterly charming. It just warmed my heart and caused me to constantly grin like a maniac while reading.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By AngellicLulu on September 20, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I've been out of the college life for a few years now, but this book took me back to my life as a college student. I related with the main character eerily well. Leigh (the main character) is a girl who just is. She doesn't feel the pressure to be more than what she is. But through her over-analysis of herself she starts to realize maybe gliding through life isn't as effective as she thought it was.

The college is based on the college my sister went to so I really understood the dynamics of the college. It's such a small school, everyone knows everyone else's business. This causes the rumor mill to spiral out of control. Poor Leigh can't keep any secrets about anything.

I highly recommend this book for 16-20 something ages. It's a romantic comedy that is definitely suitable to soon to be college students.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A few things to note about Psych Major Syndrome: Leigh, the main character, is charmingly awkward, there’s a fantastic love interest, and the book is overall just hilarious. Psych Major Syndrome definitely gets bonus points for the college setting as well. If you’re one of those readers who likes the idea of the new adult genre but want more than the focus on the physical romance, I would totally recommend Psych Major Syndrome. It’s more in the vein of books like Just One Day by Gayle Foreman(though less serious than that one), and Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell. Leigh struggles with her classes and assignments, taking the next step with her boyfriend, and dealing with frustrations like parking tickets. I think perhaps part of why this book has flown under the radar is that it was published before this push for college-aged stories–otherwise, I think it would be much better known than it currently is.

Leigh is. . . well, I can’t say she’s exactly a girl after my own heart, but she is adorkable and smart but also dumb at times and just a really well-rounded main character. Some of the things she says are so painfully awkward I couldn’t help but to feel for her, but she also has a great sense of humor(most of the time–there was a time or too when I thought the humor in this book was too mean, so it does lose a point for that). She makes great decisions at time, but is also completely unaware of problems at others, especially in her relationship with her high school boyfriend, Andrew. They’re at the same college, and a big focus of the book is the strain on their relationship, and how it manifest itself physically. I really loved this storyline.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search