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Psychlone Paperback


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Ibooks, Inc.; Reprint edition (October 16, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1596873353
  • ISBN-13: 978-1596873353
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,694,351 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Bear is one of our very best."--New York Daily News
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

* #40 in the Millennium SF Masterworks series, a library of the finest science fiction ever written. * Blood Music won the Nebula and Hugo Awards in its original shorter form. * 'One of the few SF writers capable of following where Olaf Stapledon led, beyond the limits of human ambition and geological time' Locus * 'Arthur C. Clarke has his most formidable rival yet' The Times --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

More About the Author

Greg Bear is the author of more than thirty books, spanning thrillers, science fiction, and fantasy, including Blood Music, Eon, The Forge of God, Darwin's Radio, City at the End of Time, and Hull Zero Three. His books have won numerous international prizes, have been translated into more than twenty-two languages, and have sold millions of copies worldwide. Over the last twenty-eight years, he has also served as a consultant for NASA, the U.S. Army, the State Department, the International Food Protection Association, and Homeland Security on matters ranging from privatizing space to food safety, the frontiers of microbiology and genetics, and biological security.

Customer Reviews

There are simply too many flaws to name.
P. Falk
I really feel awkward saying this, but the book would have been much better had it been written by Steven King.
RedRyder
It was not bad but not as good as I think it could have been.
George

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 21, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I can't understand the bad reviews. This book is important, not for the surface plot, but for the REALLY creepy idea that Bear purports - that mankind has become so powerful that we can now kill souls. This power has been ursurped from God (or whatever name you prefer) and we now face the consequences. This idea gave me the whillies. What a horrific thought. I am a reader of scifi, horror, etc., and this is the first time I ever came across this idea. Read it with an open mind and consider the possibilities.
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By The Emperor on October 7, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
This is an intriguing and interesting horror novel. There are some interesting characters in it and it is quite well written.

The explanation behind the events is very well conceived and almost sounds convincing! Certainly it a class above most horror novel when it comes to a plausible, logical, consistent and credible scenario.

The actions scenes were well handled and generally made sense.

I would have liked certain elements to have been developed a bit further but overall I thought that this was a very decent and unsentimental novel.
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By The Emperor on October 7, 2012
Format: Paperback
This is an intriguing and interesting horror novel. There are some interesting characters in it and it is quite well written.

The explanation behind the events is very well conceived and almost sounds convincing! Certainly it a class above most horror novel when it comes to a plausible, logical, consistent and credible scenario.

The actions scenes were well handled and generally made sense.

I would have liked certain elements to have been developed a bit further but overall I thought that this was a very decent and unsentimental novel.
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Format: Paperback
A mysterious force plays havoc in a remote community in this sci-fi/fantasy by Greg Bear. The opening section deals with a ghostly presence that draws energy from around an isolated cabin, freezing whatever life it finds; and in itself, this isn't a bad story, if only Bear had stopped there. But after that, the plot becomes increasing disjointed, with too many characters, many of whom don't survive long enough for us to get to know them. And who is the protagonist? Fowler? Or Jacobs? Or tiny Tim? And what real purpose do all these characters serve? This reviewer found it hard to care about any of them.

Bear's facile prose always makes for easy reading, and the short chapters make it convenient if you like to read in small bites, but when all's said and done, the plot is very shaky (almost insubstantial) the characters are wooden and wholly forgettable, and nothing really gels. There's a germ of an idea here about the souls of POW's killed by the atomic bomb during WWII, but instead of logically developing this concept, Bear relies on the sheer horror of it, which ultimately fails. Kind of like this whole novel.

If you're looking for something by Greg Bear, this reviewer suggests "Eon" instead; while not a perfect book, it has plenty of interesting ideas and holds together quite a bit better.
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By themarsman on August 15, 2010
Format: Paperback
In the small town of Lorobu, New Mexico, a horror struck. For an unknown reason all but one of its more than eight hundred citizens wound up dead. But not just dead...they took whatever household objects they could find and in a fit of unspeakable madness, killed each other and themselves.

At an isolated cabin in the backwoods of California, a man took time off to visit his father for a few days. Later, the two men were found dead...the father killed his son and then himself.

The military, along with a few select "civilian contractors", (and the one survivor from Lorobu) begins to research the horrible events at these two places -- Lorobu and the cabin in California. What they discover may flip our whole world upside down and bring to bare some of Humanity's worst fears and most profound horrors.

Greg Bear's Psychlone is an interesting ghost story. What on Earth could turn hundreds of people so mad that they would kill themselves and others as they did. Psycholone explores a very tenuous ground for science fiction...viewing death from the spiritual point of view -- what happens to us after we die. (I say "tenuous" because science fiction is generally grounded in fact and then from those facts extrapolations are pulled. But with death and spirituality, there is very little hard fact.) Bear does a decent job of melding science fact with the realm of spirituality. The main problem with the tale was that there were just a few too many holes...how exactly were Lorobu and the cabin connected?? Nonetheless, I applaud Bear's attempt at combining science with the world of spirituality. The novel is recommended to anyone who enjoys Bear's stories...but don't expect a literary masterpiece.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
I have been a huge fan for Greg Bears books ever since I read the book Moving Mars. I have picked up several of his books. I love the Darwin's Radio and Darwin's Children books and really enjoyed them. I have also read some of the older books Eon and The Forge of God.

Psychlone is quite a bit different than several of the books that I have read by Greg Bear. It still has the tell tell signs that makes me really like his books.

Almost all of the time that I spent reading the book I kept on wondering if I really liked the book or not. A large part of the book is spent building the story.

This book is focused mostly around two characters Tim, the last survivor of a small town in New Mexico. All of the people that lived there died mysteriously one night. The second is an engineer named Fowler, that is invited to investigate some strange occurrences in a small cabin out in the woods. This leaves him in a position studying something that he does not quite understand.

Fowler finds himself living in the cabin of his friend that mysteriously died. The cabin is haunted by what the book calls an earth spirit.

It turns out that the earth spirit and the thing that killed all of the people in the town in New Mexico did not have a lot in common other then they both hate humans and they both can be destroyed the same way.

So what caused the strange thing that is going from city to city killing people? The thing is called a Psychlone in the book because it is the psychic energy of all of the people that were involved in the explosions of the Atom bombs in Japan during WWII.

The story is interesting and it keeps the reader wondering what is going to happen next.
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