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Psychological Meaning of Redemption Motifs in Fairytales (Studies in Jungian Psychology, 2) Paperback – December, 1980


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Psychological Meaning of Redemption Motifs in Fairytales (Studies in Jungian Psychology, 2) + Shadow and Evil in Fairy Tales (A C.G. Jung Foundation Book) + The Interpretation of Fairy Tales
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Product Details

  • Series: Studies in Jungian Psychology, 2
  • Paperback: 124 pages
  • Publisher: Inner City Books; First edition (December 1980)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0919123015
  • ISBN-13: 978-0919123014
  • Product Dimensions: 0.2 x 6 x 8.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #68,177 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Steven Herrmann on April 11, 2010
Steven B. Herrmann, PhD, MFT
Author of "Walt Whitman: Shamanism, Spiritual Democracy, and the World Soul"

This is one of the most fascinating books on fairytales I have ever read! In this book von Franz is clearly at her best. What I find most helpful is what she has to say about bewitchment. By "bewitchment" she means the experience of being overtaken by what C. G. Jung called a complex and its archetypal core. Typically the subject who has become "bewitched" has been possessed by something larger, evil, and toxic, often in early childhood or latency. To be "bewitched" means that "a particular structure of the psyche is crippled or damaged in its functioning and the whole is affected." To become free of bewitchment through Jungian psychotherapy, the object-imagoes of the complexes need to be projected onto an analyst, then re-collected as inner psychological structures belonging to the patient, whether a child, adolescent, or adult, who is the projector. This is the only way, von Franz asserts that "the value or the energy invested in the image can flow back to the individual, who has need for it in his development." For instance, when the toxic core of the negative mother complex is projected onto an analyst, who becomes the carrier of the Witch archetype, we find, as we do in fairytales, the condition where some character in the story or dream, or some functional complex in the patient's object relations, has been "cursed or bewitched and through certain happenings or events in the story is redeemed. This is a very different condition," Von Franz says, "from the Christian notion of redemption." Sometimes the Witch functions together as a pair, as in "The Wizard of Oz.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By C. Collins on March 17, 2012
This is an exceptional book. Von Franz links the common theme in fairy tales of the hero or heroine cursed by a devil or witch or held captive by a troll, giant, or monster with that of the psychological complex that brings about neurosis. There are many fairy tales in all cultures where someone is cursed or captured and either the curse must be lifted or there must be an escape from captivity. Likewise, we all know of persons or situations where someone acts in an irrational way, almost as if they were cursed, to some circumstance that doesn't warrant the extreme emotional response. We all know someone who is a wonderful person but who rebels and acts irrational when dealing with someone in authority. This is just once example of how a complex, shifting and partially emerging in the unconscious, impacts conscious functioning. Thus in the same way that the witch's curse must be removed from the princess, the complex that is causing such irrational or unexpected emotional behavior may be relieved of this burden by a therapeutic process. It is fascinating that the ways curses are removed and a princess escapes from an evil troll have resonance with the Jungian therapeutic process.

The cursed hero often behaves destructively until they are redeemed. The fixated neurotic also behaves destructively until the symptoms subside and they are healed. Whereas fairy tales offer many ways that the curse is removed from the hero, it is dreams that indicate to the fixated neurotic how the unconscious proposes a cure, which von Franz says will be unique for the individual.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Kevin L. Williams on May 16, 2010
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she goes behind the everyday view of common things. Long story short, the Jungians think that primitive peoples were "projecting" their own internal states into these stories and thus by dissecting them they reveal insight to problems common to us all. I would go so far as to suggest that we each have our own fairy tales (our own story) that may bear little resemblance to what onlookers see. And it is important to keep working on our own story, keep developing it, keep growing and expanding it. Maybe even wind in a princess, a frog, and some elves... Maybe not. When I look back as far as I can see I always tried to wind in God to my story and that story has changed in some ways drastically over time, yet somehow the parts that matter (the interface) seems to stay largely the same. But its important to me that the story goes on. The Gospel According to Me: A heretic finds his way in modernity using Jungian psychology, science, dreams, and, well, the Gospels
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jungianscientist on March 20, 2013
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Are all of ML von Franz's books this one inspires and takes the read to new places in the quest for redemption
After the absurd shallowness of so many on the road to "addiction to perfection" the deep Jungian world is about living in the TAO and trusting the gods to lead us to trust our deepest instincts.
This is so refreshing in a world determined to have results at any cost.
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5 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Teresa O'Connor on September 27, 2009
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There is no doubt this woman is a genius. However, there is one statement somewhere in the book which assumes the American Indian is on a concrete level of cognition. I had to then assume she was prejudiced against them, based on my belief they had very spiritual beliefs and a love of nature. Besides this bothersome referral, I found the book useful for the possibility of utilizing fairy-tales for therapy. There are references in the index to the actual stories.

Sincerely,
Teresa O'Connor, M.A.
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