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Psychological Types (The Collected Works of C. G. Jung, Vol. 6) (Bollingen Series XX) Paperback – October 1, 1976


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Psychological Types (The Collected Works of C. G. Jung, Vol. 6) (Bollingen Series XX) + The Archetypes and The Collective Unconscious (Collected Works of C.G. Jung Vol.9 Part 1) + Man and His Symbols
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 608 pages
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press (October 1, 1976)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0691018138
  • ISBN-13: 978-0691018133
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 5.9 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #243,658 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Language Notes

Text: English, German (translation) --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

More About the Author

Carl Gustav Jung (1875-1961) was a Swiss psychiatrist, an influential thinker and the founder of analytical psychology (also known as Jungian psychology). Jung's radical approach to psychology has been influential in the field of depth psychology and in counter-cultural movements across the globe. Jung is considered as the first modern psychologist to state that the human psyche is "by nature religious" and to explore it in depth. His many major works include "Analytic Psychology: Its Theory and Practice," "Man and His Symbols," "Memories, Dreams, Reflections," "The Collected Works of Carl G. Jung," and "The Red Book."

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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I would recommend this book to anyone who want to understand the origin of the MBTI.
Jackal
Also in Symbols of Transformation, Jung begins the piece with his own work so the reader is given some interpretative tools to aid them in this process of correlation.
E. Godfrey
The book is written in Jung's usual rambling, erudite style with his usual quantity of incredible interspersed observations & conclusions.
Neal J. Pollock

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

57 of 66 people found the following review helpful By Edwardson Tan on October 18, 2003
Format: Paperback
If you're familiar with the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and want to know more about it then _Psychological Types_ is one title you'd certainly want to read. It is the definitive work on which the MBTI is based. In this volume Jung explains in detail what the nature of the two attitudes--introversion and extraversion--really are, as well as that of the four functions--intuition, sensation, thinking, and feeling. He also discusses various combinations of these attitudes and functions, such as Introverted-Thinking, Introverted-Feeling, Extraverted-Sensation, etc.
It is Jung who gave us the terms introversion and extraversion. But our colloquial understanding of these terms are not exactly what Jung had in mind. For instance introversion he says means "an inward-turning of libido [psychic energy]." Moreover, the introverted person is one who orients himself predominantly by subjective views in contrast to the extraverted who orients himself by objective (external) conditions. Therefore, extraversion and introversion have to do with which realm--outer or inner--the person is drawn to and invests his energies in. So much for our simplistic notions of what these now household words mean!
Personally, I have not read the first half of the book. When I got my copy I went straight to Chapter 10 "General Description of the Types" since that's where the meat of Jungian typology can be found. And let's not forget the four essays in the appendix. They too offer additional insights into typology.
As a bonus there is an entire chapter (some 80 pages) entitled "Definitions" which is actually an in-depth glossary of some of the more important terms and ideas that Jung uses throughout the Collected Works.
If you'd like to learn about (Jungian) personality typology then I suggest you get this relatively inexpensive paperback edition. I've read many works on Jungian typology but nothing beats getting it straight from the horse's mouth.
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24 of 29 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 14, 1998
Format: Hardcover
A deep look at the mechanisms of the "psychic functions". Surely instructive for layman with its analysis of human behaviour in everyday life. This work best explores the Jung's concept of the unconscious and proves that his concept is far from being a mystical one as some critics wrote. It also gives a historical perspective of the thoughts of some great thinkers (Schiller, William James and some others )on the problem of psychological types.
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21 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Neal J. Pollock VINE VOICE on June 5, 2006
Format: Hardcover
This is the forerunner of many contemporary works on psychological types. The mother-daughter team of Briggs & Myers devised the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) on it--devising the 4th (Judgmental-Perceptive) scale based on preferences (i.e. superior function vs. secondary function) between the iNtuitive-Sensate scale & the Thinker-Feeler scale. Jung does not address the J-P scale (it didn't exist yet). The book is written in Jung's usual rambling, erudite style with his usual quantity of incredible interspersed observations & conclusions. Some modern works are far easier to read, but many (e.g. Keirsey's "Please Understand Me") leave much out. Indeed, his assessment tool is quicker but less accurate IMHO (I used to score MBTI results for a professor doing research on MBTI's in other countries). I also took a couple of short courses (paid for by the U.S. Navy) related to the MBTI--& lots of management courses which referred to it or utilized it. It is extremely useful in improving interpersonal communications & understanding amongst co-workers, supervisors, etc. I used it with my own subordinates & found it quite valuable--people shared their results readily. Of course, there's a bit of confusion between Extrovert & Introvert--surface/laymen views can be misleading. The key is where one gets/loses one's psychic energy. Introverts get it from being alone & tend to lose it in groups; Extroverts, vice versa. But, this has nothing to do with whether one enjoys people, books, parties, etc. So, to understand the types, one must read the book. As Jung states, p. 526 "The psyche is the very thing we know least about, although it seems to be what we know best of all, & furthermore that everyone else probably understands it better than we do ourselves.Read more ›
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By JG on March 19, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This Magnum Opus of Jung,totally encapsulates his main goal as to an outline of a "healthy" working personality theory with the key to understanding the intricate balance between what in our common definitions is called the man of action and the man of ideas.
Needless to say since we are all a combination of the 2,it is heart warming to see the precision and intimacy of Jung's care in explicating a sort of systematic approach while the author remains humble enough to allow for fallibility's as to the perennial question mark of uncertainty.
200 pages can take one months to savor,but for those philosophically and academically inclined the journey is worth it as Jung takes on a historical survey through biblical criticism,Greek mythology,German poetry,Idealism as well as a treasure house of distinctions and comparisons between states of being such as naivete(the extrovert) and sentimentalitty(the introvert),intoxication(extrovert) and dreaming(introvert) to convey his ideas in merging Freud and Adler into a system that became totally Jungian leaving it's footprints as a giant but not only in common day jargon between the introvert and extrovert but balancing an individuals life between conscious and unconscious reality. The emphasis on Freud the extrovert(predominance of the sexual instinct and melting/loving the world)as distinct from Adler's introversion(power and subjective positioning of mastery of one's self and world)) were philosophical insights that alone were too one sided for Jung,hence a possible union was developed by confusing love for power (or vice a versa) which leads to fragmentation whereby the individual's libido becomes lost by slipping into either the unconscious or the conscious reality without a proper regulating principle.
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