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The Psychology of Judgment and Decision Making (McGraw-Hill Series in Social Psychology) Paperback – January 1, 1993

ISBN-13: 978-0070504776 ISBN-10: 0070504776 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 302 pages
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill; 1st edition (1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0070504776
  • ISBN-13: 978-0070504776
  • Product Dimensions: 0.6 x 6.3 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #42,251 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

``Contains a wonderful selection of the classic studies on psychology.'' (Journal of Marketing)

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Customer Reviews

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All lawyers should read this book.
Michael Barfield
It gives a very well rounded overview of the many aspects of decision making: selective perception, memory, biases and heuristic, behavioral traps, etc.
Lev Virine
This is a very dense book, relatively easy to read, and very2 helpful.
T SANTOSO

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

134 of 136 people found the following review helpful By Gaetan Lion on May 10, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a fascinating book analyzing how we are all far less Cartesian than we think. In other words, a slew of predictable human bias flaws what we feel is our own objective judgment. The author eminently demonstrates this point by forcing the reader to take a 39 questions test at the beginning of the book. This test is stuffed with all the traps that illustrate the human judgment flaws that he analyzes thoroughly in following specific chapters.
You can view the test as a very entertaining IQ test from hell. The questions seem often simple. But, they are not. Other times, they are obviously difficult. I got a bit more than half of them correct. This was mainly because I had some knowledge or experience regarding certain traps the questions presented. I had made the mistake before. So, I learned from that. When I did not have any prior knowledge of a question, my results were very human, meaning not that good. But, learning the correct answer was both fun and educating.
The author touches on several fascinating probability and statistic concepts. One of them being the Bayes theorem, which suggests that medical screen test can be highly unreliable despite being touted as 80% to 90% accurate. In other words, you better understand the Bayes theorem better than the medical specialists who screen you for various diseases. Because, based on the author's study, doctors don't have a clue. Another chapter had an excellent discussion on correlation vs. causation. This includes some tricky nuances that many analysts in the financial industry trip upon. Another interesting probability concept is why it takes only 23 people in a room to have greater than a 50% that two of them share the same birthday. This seems impossible, but it is true.
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86 of 94 people found the following review helpful By "self-study" on April 23, 2003
Format: Paperback
This is my first book on psychology for self-study. As the author puts in the preface, "the focus is on experimental findings rather than psychological theory, surprising conclusions rather than intuitions, and descriptive prose rather than mathematics."
The author tends to use nuclear weapon, war, and clinical examples more often than other topics in order to illustrate concepts. The examples are taken from actual empirical researches, including laboratory ones. Due to the purpose of the textbook, the examples are used to explain concepts, rather than to show how an experiment is designed or how "good" the experiment is in the sense of cause and effect. The bibliography list is correspondingly large given only some 260 pages. The author does not forget to provide tips on how to avoid particular biases presented in a given chapter. No exercises are provided at the end of each chapter, but a special section READER SURVEY given after preface asks you to answer 39 questions to be used in the main part of the text. No glossary is provided.
As I read through, I have warned myself not to generalize research results presented to be directly applicable to my life without careful thoughts. From my naïve point of view and based only on materials presented in the book, these research findings may be internally valid, but never guaranteed to work in any other circumstances or contexts. Such context dependence is treated explicitly in Chapter 4, but it all applies to any other concepts discussed throughout the book. The author warns this point to readers at the end of the book in Appendix.
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39 of 44 people found the following review helpful By Joseph J. Kranz on April 14, 2000
Format: Paperback
Scott Plous creates an effective learning experience by entrapping you into revealing your own personal psychology of decision-making...if only to yourself. It is an extremely entertaining and educational method that holds you from the first page to the last. Whether you're an academic interested in a useful textbook tool or a lay person, manager or other professional reliant on decision-making, you'll enjoy and appreciate this book.
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By T SANTOSO on July 5, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a very dense book, relatively easy to read, and very2 helpful. I love Blink and The Tipping Point, but this book probably has much much more materials, arguably more than 5 times of inside that those two best sellers combined.

I am very interested in the popular psycology stuffs, and Influence by Cialdini is my fav. So this book in some way give you the same chockful of surprises and new insight that will change the way you think.

I came across recomended by a University of Chicago MBA -email friend- who has much similar books favourites and he recomended this highly, and i absolutely agree and i would be glad to recommend this to anyone interested in human behaviour and psychology of bias.

MBA students should read this one and surely will enjoy this. I always draw, marks and put notes on my book and i think i end up marking so much of the materials.

Section one: Perception, Memory and Context

Section two: How Questions affect answers

Section three: Model of Decision making

Section Four: Heurictis and Biases.

Section five: The Social side of judgment and decision making

Section six: Common traps.

Some will complain that this book derived from a lot of previous psychological research, i agree, so for the psychology veteran out there, this might not the right book for you, but for most of us, this book will enlight, entertain and amuse us all...
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