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Psychosemantics: The Problem of Meaning in the Philosophy of Mind (Explorations in Cognitive Science) Paperback – September 7, 1989

ISBN-13: 978-0262560528 ISBN-10: 0262560526

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Psychosemantics: The Problem of Meaning in the Philosophy of Mind (Explorations in Cognitive Science) + Naturalizing the Mind (Jean Nicod Lectures)
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Product Details

  • Series: Explorations in Cognitive Science
  • Paperback: 187 pages
  • Publisher: A Bradford Book (September 7, 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0262560526
  • ISBN-13: 978-0262560528
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.5 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #962,041 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Cognitivism argues that psychology studies behavior to infer unobservable theoretical constructs, such as `belief,' that summarize and explain empirical observations and predict new phenomena. Here, Fodor tries to provide a scientific account of commonsense belief/desire psychology by defending a representational theory of mind. Assuming that there is no alternative to the vocabulary of commonsense psychological explanation, he proposes that we have an infinite set of mental symbols at our disposal and that a propositional attitude is equivalent to a symbol's occurring and its functioning in a particular causal role. Underlying his account is the view that mental processes will turn out to be physical processes. Highly recommended for philosophers of mind and cognitive psychologists. Robert Hoffman, Philosophy Department, York Coll., CUNY
Copyright 1987 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

(Fodor's) aim in this book is to protect folk psychology, as a solid basis for mental science, from a range of objections that have been brought against it in recent years, mainly by philosophers. He does so with verve, clarity and wit, generally getting the better of his revisionary opponents. The book is vintage Fodor: clever, stimulating, challenging, infuriating.

(Colin McGinn Nature)

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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Clutch on November 6, 2001
Format: Paperback
If you know much about the philosophy of mind, then you already know that Psychosemantics is a high-water mark for one thread of debate about belief-desire psychology. If you do not yet know much about the field, this book is very strongly recommended, with two important caveats. First, it is biased. Fodor is not trying to educate; he's trying to persuade, and he does this in part by offering characterizations of his opponents' views that they would not always recognize. Second, Fodor's style is misleadingly accessible. He is funny and casual, catching himself with (almost, but not quite) the same barbs the he levels at his opponents. But his arguments -- even the humour -- presumes a very considerable knowledge of philosophy and psychology. This is a book to be read in conjunction with a pretty thorough introduction, for the novice. A companion to metaphysics would be a good idea!
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7 of 37 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 18, 2000
Format: Paperback
Fodor does not give arguments in this book. He is merely stating his opinion on issues in philosophy of mind. Why is this guy getting so many MIT Press, Harv. U. Press contracts?
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