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Crime and Punishment (Penguin Classics) Mass Market Paperback – Print, January 1, 1995


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Product Details

  • Series: Penguin Classics
  • Mass Market Paperback: 656 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Classics; Reprint edition (January 1, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140445285
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140445282
  • Product Dimensions: 7.7 x 5 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #144,747 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1821–1881), one of nineteenth-century Russia’s greatest novelists, spent four years in a convict prison in Siberia, after which he was obliged to enlist in the army. In later years his penchant for gambling sent him deeply into debt. Most of his important works were written after 1864, including Notes from Underground, Crime and Punishment, The Idiot, and The Brothers Karamazov, all available from Penguin Classics.


David McDuff was educated at the University of Edinburgh and has translated a number of works for Penguin Classics, including Dostoyevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov.


David McDuff was educated at the University of Edinburgh and has translated a number of works for Penguin Classics, including Dostoyevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov.

From AudioFile

Dostoyevsky's relentlessly bleak story about poverty and hopelessness in pre-Revolutionary Russia is boiled down to its essence. Alex Jennings is brilliant as Raskolnikov, a man unfortunate enough to have a conscience. Driven by poverty, greed, and a touch of madness, Raskolnikov murders two women for their money and spends the rest of the book trying to live with his crime. Jennings gamely works through the difficult Russian names, making them sound as common as Smith and Jones, while adding just the right amount of pathos and leaden tone to the voices of his characters. The famous novel goes a long way to helping listeners understand the root causes of the Russian Revolution. M.S. © AudioFile 2005, Portland, Maine-- Copyright © AudioFile, Portland, Maine --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

She had faith, and showed Raskolnikov the love of Christ through her actions.
Haley Mathiot
I have read it three times and always find something new and intriguing that I missed last time I was reading it.
superbookdude
A masterpiece of dramatic literature by one of the greatest novelist of all time.
fmeursault@yahoo.com

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By fmeursault@yahoo.com on October 3, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Set in Russia in the midst of its troubled transition to the modern age, this classic novel is the profound human drama of Raskolnikov, a sensitive intellectual driven by poverty and the belief of his exemption from moral law. Through his unforgettable gallery of characters, Dostoyevsky provides a provocative look at the human motivations of obsession and possession with unflinching philosophical and moral insight. A masterpiece of dramatic literature by one of the greatest novelist of all time. Crime and Punishment is the story of a murder committed on principle, of a killer who wishes by his action to set himself outside and above society. A novel of great physical and psychological tension, pervaded by Dostoevsky's sinister evocation of St Petersburg, it also has moments of wild humour. Dostoevsky's own harrowing experiences mark the novel. He had himself undergone interrogation and trial, and was condemned to death, a sentence commuted at the last moment to penal servitude. In prison he was particularly impressed by one hardened murderer who seemed to have attained a spiritual equilibrium beyond good and evil: yet witnessing the misery of other convicts also engendered in Dostoevsky a belief in the Christian idea of salvation through suffering. END
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Matthew M. Yau on May 3, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Hailed as one of the greatest novels ever written in all times, Fyodor Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment tells the tale of an ex-law student's meticulous, calculated murder of a pawnbroker woman and his showing no remorse for his atrocious crime. In this particularly vivid translation by David McDuff, the words "morbid" and "rabid fury" appear at least 5 times, respectively throughout the book. Such stylistic choices invariably set the mood. The dark and morbid prose ominously sets the foreboding tone of the novel as though the act of murder is indeed a preordained announcement of fate noted by Raskolnikov from the beginning.
The murder occurred at the very beginning of the book and proceeded which was Raskolnikov's meticulous planning and "rehearsal" of the perfect crime. He would paid a visit to the pawnbroker, made careful notice of the setup of her apartment, listened for the pitch of the notched key she used to unlock the chest, and sewed a piece of cloth inside his waistcoat to hold the axe. Whether the crime was destitute-driven, the origin of his action could be diffuse and was somehow associated with certain morbid sensations. Indeed Raskolnikov subsequently conferred on his theory about the psychological state of a criminal's mind throughout the entire process of committing the crime. In his audacious "ordinary vs. extraordinary" statement, the latter could commit the most atrocious crime to whom law did not apply. To Raskolnikov, the morbid theory justified the act of committing atrocious acts upon morally corrupt individuals (the loutish, loathsome, filthy old moneylender woman per se) for the benefit of society.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Rex Dillon on June 1, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Dostoyevsky is able to capture the human condition perhaps better than any writer since Shakespeare. This novel takes on the emotions so viscerally that is no wonder that he transcends nationality to being just Human. I also recommend his short story The Dream of a Queer Fellow. This has another English title as the use of the word queer has been alter since the story's original publication. Look it up on-line... it is posted on the Web! You can read that short story for free. Even so, do not live the rest of your life without reading this story. Like the Italian movie, The Bicycle Thief it will not fail to move you.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By David M. Synck on November 28, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I purchased this e-book edition recently and am really enjoying it so far. I did a lot of research on the various translations of this book before I decided on this particular translation To me, it seems much more readable than the Constance Garnett translation, which is what you get if you get the free e-book version. It definitely seems to be worth the $8.65 purchase price, as the readability really improves the Dostoyevsky experience.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Stephanie Redwood "Kindler" on October 31, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
I first read this about 20 years ago but didn't really appreciate it until now. It takes a while to get through but the story of Raskolnikov stays with one. I even started dreaming I was in that apartment. "`Oh God, how loathsome it all is! and can I, can I possibly....No, it's nonsense, it's rubbish!' he added resolutely. `And how could such an atrocious thing come into my head? What filthy things my heart is capable of.'" Indeed...
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Evan Wearne on July 11, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
How can one determine which novel is the best ever written? I would like to say this is the best novel I have read, but how can I compare Dostoyevsky to Hemmingway to Tolstoy. They all have different styles, and are excellent authors. This is the best book I have read by Dostoyevsky. Reading his novel, I feel, is better than reading history of 19th century Russia, and he does not intend to give a history lesson, the culture reveals itself in his novel.
Although I can not say this is the best book I have ever read, it has two conversations which are the best literature I have seen. Each time Rashkolnikov visits Porfiry, the novel becomes incredibly dramatic. This is the first time I have felt what a character in a novel (or movie) is feeling. I feel his nervousness being questioned. I felt arrogant that I could outsmart the cop. I became anxious over my possible punishment. I kept thinking, if I do not get found out this time, I will never do anything wrong again. Crime is to nerve racking.
My final comment is on Russia itself. I was surprised at how some of the 19th century contempory ideas have correspondants in our culture. Crime and Punishment is a great novel, I recommend it to all who enjoy literature.
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