Qty:1
Punk: Attitude has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by The_Media_Store
Condition: Used: Very Good
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for up to $0.55
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Punk: Attitude
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Punk: Attitude


List Price: $19.93
Price: $14.96 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
You Save: $4.97 (25%)
Only 9 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
13 new from $9.98 5 used from $6.99
Watch Instantly with Rent Buy
Other Formats & Versions Amazon Price New from Used from
DVD
"Please retry"
2-Disc Version
$14.96
$9.98 $6.99

Deal of the Week: Save 62% on "Murder, She Wrote: The Complete Series"
This week only, save on "Murder, She Wrote: The Complete Series". For the first time ever, all 12 seasons are available on 63 discs in one complete collection. Learn more
 
 
Buy This DVD and Watch it Instantly
Watch the Amazon Instant Video version on your PC, Mac, compatible TV or compatible device at no charge when you buy this DVD from Amazon.com. The Amazon Instant Video version will be available in Your Video Library and is provided as a gift with disc purchase. Available to US customers only. See Terms and Conditions.
 
 


Frequently Bought Together

Punk: Attitude + Punk's Not Dead + Another State of Mind
Price for all three: $36.54

Buy the selected items together

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?



Product Details

  • Actors: Henry Rollins, Thurston Moore, Chrissie Hynde, Jello Biafra, Mick Jones
  • Directors: Don Letts
  • Format: Dolby, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Shout! Factory
  • DVD Release Date: January 11, 2011
  • Run Time: 270 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00465I1B0
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #208,783 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

DISC 1

� Where Are They Now?

� Artist Bios

� Punk Family Tree

DISC 2

� Henry Rollins Interview

� Dave Goodman Feature

� California Screamin� �Behind The Masque�

� Fanzines

� Fashion

� Women In Punk

� Record Companies

� U.K. Vs. The U.S.

� The Attitude/Spirit Of Punk

� Punk On Culture And The Arts

� Punk Evolution

� The Gigs/Performance

� The Punk Sound

� U.S. Post Punk Documentary

� L.A. Punk (Short Film By Dick Rude)


Editorial Reviews

In the mid-1970s, a revolution was ignited on the streets of New York and London. Almost overnight it shattered the status quo and continued to impact all future generations of youth culture. Redefining popular music and fashion, it threatened the establishment and legitimized an independent, do-it-yourself attitude. Punk inspired an entire generation of filmmakers, poets, photographers, fashion designers and graphic artists.

PUNK: Attitude takes an original look at this movement. With a cast of historic and modern figures in popular culture, it ventures beyond the music, beyond the fashion, beyond the hype…

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

34 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Martin Percival on October 9, 2005
Format: DVD
Sometimes it does feel like punk never happened but, peel back the surface in a great many areas, especially in much literature and many films, and talk to some people in their teens and 20s and the true influences are still certainly there, albeit maybe a little beneath the surface.

If the question "where did the Punk movement come from & where did it go to?" has ever run through your brain then Don Lett's film "Punk Attitude", together with Jon Savage's book "Englands Dreaming", are the best places (so far) to start looking to answer this. They also both help explore the ways the movement influenced many peoples lives, and not only the musicians involved, especially in regards to getting them involved - to be players and not just spectators, also clearly demonstrating that it's still relevant to the FUTURE.

"Punk Attitude" makes it very clear that punk didn't all start with the Ramones in the US and the Sex Pistols & Clash in the UK and that punk = an attitude, not a hair cut or a style of clothing - just in case people might think otherwise! Although all three bands were hugely influential when they formed in the mid 70s, and still are very much so now nearly 30 years later, they didn't come from out of nowhere and had their own host of influences back to Elvis and Jerry Lee Lewis and on through the British Invasion groups like the Who, Kinks and Small Faces. These groups in turn influenced the Standells, Sonics and Count Five and then on through the Velvet Underground, Doors, Stooges, MC5 plus the New York Dolls. Letts explores this cross polination and influencing process very well in "Punk Attitude", without turning it into a boring navel gazing university thesis style analysis that would have been totally inappropriate for such subject matter.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By John P. Lennon on July 24, 2005
Format: DVD
Just saw the the Don Letts produced and directed film "Punk: Attitude" on The IFC channel tonight. I think it really nailed what Punk really is, while at the same time debunked and demystified what corporate media tries to tell us to believe it is. Much was left out. What do you expect for an hour and half film. Some intelligent interviews are seen in the film, namely Chrissie Hynde, Henry Rollins, and Jello Biafra. Jim Jarmusch offers some interesting viewpoints from outside the music scene. But a lot of cool information is jammed into this hour and a half. Henry, Jello, and Thurston Moore even get a little political at the end which brought a little smile of amusement to my face. I dug it. I liken it to a fabric, torn, with many disparete threads, tied together in the end, giving the semblance of a cohesive whole. A video essay if you will. Of course, the film is made up of just personal opinions. Who's to say if they are true? Who cares? But, these are the people who were there, in the middle of it, who saw it happen. Noticably missing was Lenny Kaye (who did his duty in an earlier film) and Johhny Rotten (who has had his say many times over). I think the one bit of knowledge that we can all gain from this is that Punk (whether you call it by that name or not) is that it is one of the most enduring of the rock genres. It means freedom. It spells freedom. It's about freedom. It's not about fashion or guitar volume or how fast you can play. It's an attitude.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Melkor VINE VOICE on September 24, 2006
Format: DVD
I highly recommend this documentary for any punk rock fans, or fans of music history in general. Even if you don't like punk rock music, there is a lot to be learned from this film. This movie does a pretty good job of summing up why these people were making the music they were making, starting in the mid-60's, going through roughly 1980 in detail. The film includes interviews with many people who either made the music (New York Dolls, Suicide, The Damned, The Clash, Sex Pistols, The Ramones, Siouxsie and the Banshees, Buzzcocks, and more...well, the members still alive who would agree to interviews, at least), and people who made music that was influenced by the first wave of punk rock (Henry Rollins, Jello Biafra, Thurston Moore, Agnostic Front).

What is "punk rock"? That seems to be the mission statement of the film. How do you define a style that bases itself in the idea of non-conformity? One of the most interesting things to learn from the film is that many of the bands who made the music in the late `70's seem to believe that punk died when bands started referring to themselves as "punk".

The film does have a few faults. There are some glaringly missing interviews. From the pre/proto-punk era, they did manage to get a brief clip of John Cale from The Velvet Underground, and members of MC5, but not one member of The Stooges? Without a lot of interviews from the pre/proto era, that part of the film plays a little like one of those VH1 shows, where they show a clip of something nostalgic, and then a famous person comes on and says something like, "I remember that. I like that." Fortunately, there isn't too much of that, though.

Another problem with the film is the glaring omission of the 80's.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Max Jones on July 26, 2005
Format: DVD
I just caught this on IFC and found it to be a remarkably heartfelt journey into punk rock's greasy chasm. This is really the first Punk documentary I've seen that actually attempts to explore the punk thread way back to Jerry Lee Lewis (the Killer gets ample (vintage) screentime shaking his disheveled locks while standing atop a soon-to-be-torched grand piano.) Good attetion paid to

? Mark & the Mysterions, Standells, the Velvets, MC5 and John Sinclair, and of course, The Stooges, NY Dolls, Television, Suicide, The Ramones. Then we move to England and get The Clash, Sex Pistols, The Buzzcocks and the Damned. This section of the film is most succinct, perhaps due to Mr. Letts proximity at the center of the scene. This is very good, though, since it grounds the film a bit. I especially liked the "100-days-of-the-100-Club"

explanation.

The film follows punk into the post-punk movement (maybe a doc of it's own in the future?) And back to the US where the NO-Wave movement finally gets its screen-time. Then it's pretty much all west-coast Black Flag stuff, until Nirvana comes along and ruins everything. I would have loved to have seen the Germs, Adolescents, especially X. But I'm sure there just wasn't room. Maybe Mr. Letts will make another film and keep going, digging deeper and wider. I hope so. The interviews are what make this film special. Though I could have done with a bit less Rollins. S'funny... lots of the older British punks almost seem to cultivate some kind of Dickensian thing in manner and looks. This was really entertaining and kind of comes off as the antithesis of something like "The Filth and The Fury" : take a gander at Mick Jones, et al. On the other hand, the years have been quite good to (X-Ray Spex) Polly Styrene.

This film is a wonderfully engaging punk rock history lesson.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in