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  • Pururambo
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Pururambo


List Price: $19.95
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Pururambo + Mysterious Mamberamo + Omo: A Journey to the Primaeval Age
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Product Details

  • Directors: Pavol Barabas
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Color, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Cinema Libre
  • DVD Release Date: October 28, 2008
  • Run Time: 54 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001FQHQ8W
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #278,950 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Pururambo" on IMDb

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

PURURAMBO

Customer Reviews

3.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Tradecraft TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 4, 2013
Format: DVD
Pururambo is the story of Pavol Barabas's journey into the rarely seen rain forest of New Guinea. The areas that are visited are so remote that very few people have ever ventured or seen these native tribes. Some of the natives are tree dwellers and actually build their home in trees as a method to have protection against mosquitos, as well as other, dangers in the tropical forest. Over 700 languages are spoken in this region of the world yet the inhabitants have very little, if any, contact with anyone outside of their tribe and have no idea who else inhabits the same forest. This documentary provides a very unique and interesting glimpse into a very primitive world that has not progressed with modern times. These natives start fire using primitive fire starting methods, have primitive tools, and yet they survive and provide for their families. As an outsider looking in it is difficult for me to determine if they "thrive" in their environment as it really depends on their perspective, not mine.

Many of the tribes are very fearful of outsiders, especially white people who they have never seen before, and Barabas really puts himself in some very potentially dangerous situations in order to meet the tribes. Pururambo is an interesting look into another world. It would be very difficult for "modern" people to live the lifestyle of these tribes especially considering what they eat such as mice, grubs, bugs, lizards, snakes, etc. It would also be interesting to see how these tribes would react to the modern world. Can you imagine how they would react to modern medicine, wars, nuclear weapons, televisions, cell phones, cars, airplanes, computers, or the fact that man has been on the moon! In the end these tribes should be left as they are and not interfered with in any manner.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By chickieD on November 5, 2013
Format: DVD
I watched this on Netflix recently. I recommend it but it is also disturbed me in a lot of ways. It was fascinating how they actually got through the jungle where there are no paths and so many dangers, and fascinating to learn about the tribal people's beliefs and culture. On the other hand, I felt disturbed the the filmmakers approach; his interactions with people, and his rather facile summary of the people he met as "pururambo" (good). They are headhunters, so, maybe we can find a way to think about them that is more complex? They aren't just there to help the filmmaker see the world more spiritually. And while their approach to life may make him feel good during a brief visit, if he were to be there during an actual act of cannibalism would he still think they were "good."

The people in these tribes live in a way that is unimaginable to Western people: focused obsessively on gathering food, so little possessions and tools, lives intertwined with magic and superstition. It is interesting - incredible - to see how they live, eat, survive. I recommend watching it, but it's hard to shake off how he went about getting the footage, and I had a lot of questions about what was happening when the camera was off.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By d7575u on September 1, 2012
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This documentary was really interesting and well narrated. Great example of how anthropology can be used to study indigenous tribes without being overly invasive or disruptive- takes an objective view of situations that would disturb most people.
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Format: DVD
Why does National Geographic, the History Channel, and Discovery continue to only use/allow journalists to explore and narrate these type of documentaries beats me. These networks are supposed to be managed by Westerners and 'civilized' educated people who have NO UNDERSTANDING of what Natives/Indigenous worlds really have been, are and will be. WHY WHY WHY are anthropologists not invited to do these type of documentaries? Why don't these networks rely on the true understandings that the anthropology discipline could bring? BECAUSE THEY WANT TO CONTINUE LYING TO THE VIEWERS and they want to continue the portrayal of a perfect Western civilized world making the 'other' seen as non-civilized, savage, or naive. PLEASE, IF NOT MADE WITHIN AN ANTHROPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE, IT IS WORTH 0. Hire the correct discipline to instruct us and not journalists with fantasy lala land ideologies.
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