Buy New
$6.63
Qty:1
  • List Price: $6.95
  • Save: $0.32 (5%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Pushing Gravity: New Pers... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Pushing Gravity: New Perspectives on Le Sage's Theory of Gravitation Paperback – April, 2002


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, April, 2002
"Please retry"
$6.63
$6.53 $6.52

Best Books of the Year
See the Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
$6.63 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Pushing Gravity: New Perspectives on Le Sage's Theory of Gravitation + What Is the Electron? + Einstein and the Ether
Price for all three: $19.49

Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Matthew R. Edwards studied biology, biochemistry and plant ecology at McMaster University, York University and the University of Saskatchewan. Since 1983 he has been at the Gerstein Science Information Centre of the University of Toronto. He has diverse research interests and has been the author of several articles on cosmology and the origin and early evolution of life.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Gold Box Deal of the Day: Up to 80% Off Fiction Favorites
Today only, more than 15 fiction favorites are up to 80% off on Kindle. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 316 pages
  • Publisher: Apeiron; y First edition edition (April 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0968368972
  • ISBN-13: 978-0968368978
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.7 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #531,975 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
5 star
71%
4 star
14%
3 star
0%
2 star
14%
1 star
0%
See all 7 customer reviews
Best essay is the one by Tom Van Flandern.
Glen
The book deserves reading my anyone adventarous enough to think that scientific ideas should be considered that aren't in the beaten path.
Don L. Jewett
Reading it is like taking a joyride through the universe at speeds thousands of times faster than light!
Michael Christian

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Neil DeRosa on February 21, 2003
Some of the greatest minds in history have pondered this question-and then pretty much given up on it. Newton, and later Einstein, to a more exacting degree, gave us mathematical models of gravity, which hold true to this day. Except that they say nothing about the mechanism which actually causes gravity. Einstein's theory, General Relativity (GR), attributes the cause to the "fabric of space." But as Tom Van Flandern, one of the contributors to this book, points out, Einstein's "rubber sheet analogy" presumes real gravity underneath the "fabric" which causes planets to sink down into the "gravity wells" in the sheet. It therefore explains nothing about the real cause of gravity.
In the mid 18th century, G.L. LeSage proposed a mechanical theory of gravity whereby tiny particles in space move about in all directions and at very high speeds, causing equal force on all sides of any object or planet they make contact with. But the space between any two objects has less of these particles or "gravitons" than the surrounding space, because some of the gravitons have already been absorbed as they passed through the object. This dearth of gravitons between objects causes a kind of low-pressure area allowing the gravitons in the outlying areas to push the objects together-thus causing gravity.
LeSage's theory has been revived and then rejected by many famous scientists over the years, and is presently undergoing its most recent revival. If such particles exist, there must be a way to detect them. One method, attempted by the physicist Q. Majorana, early in the 20th century, was to test the effect that gravitational shielding has on the absorption of gravitons and hence the weight of objects.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
23 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Ritchie Annand on January 7, 2004
This is an eminently refreshing book. In a world that takes "bending of space" as literal, and for granted, it's worthwhile remembering that we still don't have a mechanism for how gravity works. Even the "bending of space" might imply being "pushed" by interaction with particles from some physical fourth dimension.
This book takes a step back from that and tries to posit physical underpinnings of gravity in our own universe, no extra dimensions required.
The major underlying position of the papers in this book is that gravity is caused by the pushing force of particles. That said, there's an impressive variety of mechanisms through which it can be accomplished, and various authors set out to posit their particular solutions.
Explanations range from the markedly hypothetical (Tom van Flandern posits faster-than-light interaction, disallowed by Einsteinian relativity, but surprisingly allowed by Lorentzian relativity), to the almost 'banal' (positing that gravity is caused by normal EM particles of a particular wavelength, along the same way that microwaves and heat-infrared interact), and many options in-between.
There's a lot of solid mathematics going on here, which you can follow along with, and a lot of decent prose to go with it.
What I found most interesting was that, while many equations duplicate the inverse square law to the umpteenth degree, many of the theories posit testable aberrations from the inverse square law. That may be the lynchpin to their success (or failure). Some propose they might solve the mysteries of the aberrations of satellite orbits, or even why a galaxy can maintain its outer rim shape without huge amounts of dark matter.
Highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Don L. Jewett on February 13, 2005
This is a remarkable book, from both the historical side of science and

from the future side, as well. The book shows that, contrary to what is said

for the laity, gravity is still not understood, and perhaps Einstein wasn't correct

in everything. There is an amazing, short chapter uniting gravity and EM theory

by suggesting that gravity is just ultra-long EM waves! And they are ultralong

because of the Compton effect. The Compton effect puzzled Bohr and Einstein,

and ultimately convinced Bohr about quanta. That it might be the cause

of gravity is an exciting idea. The book deserves reading my anyone adventarous

enough to think that scientific ideas should be considered that aren't in the

beaten path.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Michael Christian on January 11, 2004
Verified Purchase
I'm by no means a scientist -- I got a "C" in chemistry in college -- but I enjoy books about cosmology and astronomy, especially ones that challenge accepted wisdom. I loved this book. Reading it is like taking a joyride through the universe at speeds thousands of times faster than light! All the essays were great, especially Tom Van Flandern's. Ever wonder what Copernicus felt as he realized that most scientists of his day had it wrong? Get this book and you'll experience some of that sense of wonder and excitement. Then read Van Flandern's magnum opus "Dark Matter,Missing Planets and New Comets: Paradoxes Resolved,Origins Illuminated."
by Michael Christian
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?