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Pushing Yourself to Power: The Ultimate Guide to Total Body Transformation Spiral-bound


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Pushing Yourself to Power: The Ultimate Guide to Total Body Transformation + Isometric Power Revolution: Mastering the Secrets of Lifelong Strength, Health, and Youthful Vitality (Transformetrics: The Ultimate Training System) + The Miracle Seven: 7 Amazing Exercises that Slim, Sculpt, and Build the Body in 20 Minutes a Day
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Product Details

  • Spiral-bound: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Bronze Bow Publishing (January 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1932458018
  • ISBN-13: 978-1932458015
  • Product Dimensions: 10.9 x 8.5 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (128 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #362,903 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

JOHN PETERSON is a 50-year-old businessman/physical fitness expert who has a physique that makes eighteen-year-olds jealous. HeÂ’s been using this training system for years and guarantees to turn lambs into lions. So do it now! Do it anywhere!

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Customer Reviews

Very good inspiring book.
Bob Rosenberg
I am lean and have well developed muscle definition since being on his program and only using self resistance, visualized resistance and bodyweight exercises.
Luke Barrett
I've been meaning to write a review of this book from some time, but I wanted to wait until I had a chance to really work with the exercises.
Mark J. Grice

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

333 of 347 people found the following review helpful By Mark J. Grice on December 5, 2005
Format: Spiral-bound
I've been meaning to write a review of this book from some time, but I wanted to wait until I had a chance to really work with the exercises.

A little background on me (since anyone thinking of buying an exercise book wants to know: Will it work for a guy like me?)

I am ready to turn 45. I am what you might call a weekend athlete. I play hockey in a league here. I have never been a world-class athlete or body-builder, but I've never been horribly out of shape, either. I take care of myself. Don't smoke, drink a little, and watch what I eat. I'm in pretty good shape. I am not as trim as I was in High-School, but I don't have much of a gut. I am 6'2" and about 200 pounds. So, kind of middle of the road physique-wise.

I am a reader, so I have read all kinds of books on fitness and bodybuilding, and buy Men's Health every month (damn, I could save some money with a subscription, come to think of it!). I know about every theory you can name. (If only knowing were the same as doing!)

Last year, I joined a local fitness club. After three weeks, I felt a difference. My body tightened up nicely. My waist trimmed. I looked better in clothes, and my wife appreciated the difference out of them.

I wasn't bulky big. But the difference was noticeable. I felt good.

But, you know how it is... you have a job, a wife, two kids... Getting to the Gym is hard when you are also designated Kid Taxi.

I stopped going... lost my definition, put on some weight, and was pretty disappointed in myself.

Enter Push Yourself to Power (PYPT). I've been working out with it for a couple of months, and the gym results are back - even though I haven't darkened the door of any gym. That's very cool!

Is it magic? Are you kidding?
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162 of 170 people found the following review helpful By J. Swift on October 25, 2004
Format: Spiral-bound
This is the best book you can buy on increasing your strength, losing weight, and just getting into perfect shape. The money you would have to spend to equal the information in this one book, would be alot. Its an encyclopedia on Physical culture. Its the best resource that Im aware of. And the book is just filled with information. 182 pages filled with text and pictures. Unlike Pavel and Matt Furey's books that use huge font, and 1 or 2 pictures of the exercise. Example John does the Furey Pushup and shows 8 pictures of him doing it during different parts of the exercise. Matt Furey shows 2 pictures of him doing it. If you buy Matt's book "Combat Conditioning" you would still probably have to buy a video to figure out how to actually do the exercise. Not with PYTP after seeing the 8 pictures of John doing the exercise you know exactly how to do it. And the whole book is like that. Thats just one example.

The strong part of the book is the layout. The book breaks down like this.

John's writing style is very readable. You can tell he knows what he writing about. Every subject from the exercises to nutrition, to goal setting is very well done. Good explanations of the exercises, good uplifting advice(motivational), with enough humor thrown in to keep it from ever getting dry.

As far as books about BWE's go this is the best one Ive read to date. He outdoes Atlas and Furey with this book. I havent read anything from Liederman so I cant comment on his work.

John's workouts are designed to give you 7 attributes of Dynamic Fitness

1.Strength

2.Flexibility

3.Endurance

4.Speed

5.Balance

6.Coordination

7.
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64 of 68 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Tobey on October 18, 2003
Format: Spiral-bound
This is one of the few fitness books (especially those dealing with bodyweight training) that really can be used by anyone of any fitness level. Can't do a pushup or a chinup? No big deal, John has a workout that can allow you to build up strength until you can handle your own bodyweight. On the other end of the spectrum, he presents several ways that you can continue to challenge yourself through a lifetime of working out without ever having to go to a gym or buy special equipment.
The exercises John teaches have been around for years and since the old Charles Atlas stuff (a big part of these workouts) went out of fashion at least a quarter century ago, many of us have never heard of some of these techniques.
While the workouts haven't been mainstream for a generation or so, the nutrition advice is pretty much in line with what most registered dieticians would recommend. It's not a low carb diet, but an approach that will allow you to shed fat and provide enough energy for your workouts.
It's a good, entertaining read and the workouts are definitely worth a try.
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30 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Gregory Smith on September 16, 2006
Format: Spiral-bound Verified Purchase
It's so hard to find a balanced review of this book. There are people who love it, and people who hate it, and a lot of the difference between those groups comes from their background and what they were expecting. Hopefully you can figure out from my outline of what's good and bad whether this title would be useful to you, and set your expectations accordingly.

Most of what PYTP discusses is musty history. The main value of the book is to serve as an aggregator of techniques rather than an innovator of them. There's a heavy influence from the many decades old Charles Atlas "Dynamic Tension" program. The book gives Matt Furey credit he probably deserves for popularizing ancient exercises that Furey himself never tried to take credit for inventing; this seems to annoy some for no good reason. If you're already familiar with the classic systems from people like Atlas and Liederman, and you're familiar with Furey's exercises, then, no, you won't find much value here.

Those who are new to these techniques will find this glossy treatment an easier way to learn than trying to accumulate all of them separately. Suggesting one should instead decipher the tutorials or ancient texts scans floating around the Internet is really missing the point. When I was trying to learn how to do a "Furey Pushup" aka "Hindu Pushup" aka any number of other names it's been called, I appreciated having Peterson's clear pictures sitting next to me on the floor as I worked it out. I know perfectly well that I can download and print many valuable bodyweight training systems myself, for "free", from sites like Sandow Plus.
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