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Putting Amazing Back into Grace: Embracing the Heart of the Gospel Paperback – October 1, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Baker Books; Rev Upd edition (October 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0801014212
  • ISBN-13: 978-0801014215
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.1 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #81,736 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

Stand in amazement at God's incredible grace

"The gospel is a very specific announcement," says Michael Horton. "It's a message delivered from God to people in a precarious and hazardous spot--that is, to people like you and me." But what exactly is that message? What does it mean to be "saved by grace"?

Now revised and updated, Putting Amazing Back into Grace reminds us of the Reformation's radical view of God and his saving grace, the liberating yet humbling truth that we contribute nothing to our salvation. Horton lays out the scriptural basis for this doctrine and its implications for a vibrant evangelical faith.


"With all our technological expertise and intellectual arrogance, we have become the cleverest fools in world history. Mike Horton has seen through all the excuses and appreciates that true and timeless wisdom is found in the paths of the Christian gospel. Putting Amazing Back into Grace expresses the thrill of his soul--and mine--as we gaze upon the triumph of God's almighty grace."--from the foreword by J. I. Packer

Michael Horton (PhD, University of Coventry and Wycliffe Hall, Oxford) is J. Gresham Machen Professor of Systematic Theology and Apologetics at Westminster Seminary California. He hosts The White Horse Inn radio broadcast and is editor-in-chief of Modern Reformation magazine. He is the author/editor of more than twenty books, including Christless Christianity, The Gospel-Driven Life, and The Gospel Commission.

About the Author

Michael Horton (Ph.D., University of Coventry and Wycliffe Hall, Oxford) is J. Gresham Machen Professor of Systematic Theology and Apologetics at Westminster Seminary California. He hosts The White Horse Inn radio broadcast and is editor-in-chief of Modern Reformation magazine. He is the author/editor of more than twenty books, including Christless Christianity, The Gospel-Driven Life, and The Gospel Commission.

More About the Author

Michael S. Horton

White Horse Inn, President
White Horse Inn Radio Show, Co-Host
Editor-in-Chief, Modern Reformation Magazine
J. Gresham Machen Professor of Systematic Theology and Apologetics at Westminster Seminary California

B.A., Biola University; M.A., Westminster Seminary California; Ph.D., University of Coventry and Wycliffe Hall, Oxford.

Michael Horton is the president of White Horse Inn, a multi-media catalyst for Reformation. He is editor-in-chief of Modern Reformation magazine (www.modernreformation.org) and co-host of the nationally syndicated White Horse Inn radio broadcast (www.whitehorseinn.org). Michael Horton is also the J. Gresham Machen Professor of Systematic Theology and Apologetics at Westminster Seminary California. Before coming to WSC, Michael Horton completed a Research Fellowship at Yale University Divinity School. A member of various societies, including the American Academy of Religion and the Evangelical Theological Society, Michael Horton is the author/editor of twenty books, including a series of studies in Reformed dogmatics published by Westminster John Knox, whose final volume (_People and Place: A Covenant Ecclesiology_) was published in 2008 which won the 2008 Christianity Today Book of the Year award in Theology.

His most recent books are _The Gospel-Driven Life_, _Christless Christianity_ and _People and Place: A Covenant Ecclesiology_. He has written articles for _Modern Reformation_, _Pro Ecclesia_, _Christianity Today_, _The International Journal of Systematic Theology_, _Touchstone_, and _Books and Culture_.

Michael Horton is associate pastor of Christ United Reformed Church in Santee, California, and lives in Escondido, with his wife, Lisa, and four children.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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This book will leave you in awe before the greatness of our God.
Tim Challies
Though Michael Horton can write theology books that mainly theologians would enjoy or understand, this book is written so that the lay person can understand.
Dusty Rhodes
After one quick reading of this book, it all began to really make sense to me.
D. McHone

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

57 of 57 people found the following review helpful By Tim Challies TOP 1000 REVIEWER on September 25, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Putting Amazing Back Into Grace is the first book I have read by Michael Horton. It will certainly not be my last. On the cover of the book J.I. Packer declares the book "a breaktaking workout" and his praise is justified. This book points us back to the Reformation and ultimately to the Bible itself as the source of an amazing grace that much of modern Christianity seems to have lost. He presents timeless truths as being as relevant to us today as they were when they were first discovered.

Horton redraws the standard TULIP acronym using modern terms. Total Depravity becomes Rebels Without A Cause, Unconditional Election becomes Grace Before Time, Limited Atonement becomes Mission Accomplished, Irresistible Grace becomes Intoxicating Grace and Perseverance of The Saints becomes No Lost Causes. While the terms may have changed, the truth behind each is defended and, perhaps best of all, made relevant to life. More than a theological treatise, this book contains an element of intense practicality where Horton shows how these doctrines are relevant to everyday life.

Among the other topics Horton covers are dispensationalism which he bravely attacks and the sacraments which he describes as being two keys to spiritual growth. I found the chapter of sacraments the weakest part of the book. While he has given me some food for thought, I do have to take issue with some of his statements. He takes a firm stance for paedo-baptism as well as a sacramental view of the "ordinances", so be prepared for that. His comments about evangelical churches adding extra sacraments (ie recommitment) are well-taken.

Perhaps my greatest praise is that this book challenges so many assumptions and so many of the words and phrases Christians use all the time.
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25 of 25 people found the following review helpful By D. McHone on July 6, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have been re-re-reading "Putting Amazing Back into Grace" by Michael Horton and am stunned once again! Any book that can capture your thoughts the third time around and make you expand on those thoughts is a book that you can really enjoy over and over until the binding wears out. The way I'm reading the book this time is reminiscent of the way I read "Desiring God" by John Piper about a year ago, chapter by chapter.

It is a slow, methodical process and one would think that reading a chapter more than once before moving on would get monotonous, but not so. This is my favorite way to read anything of substance.

When an author presents something radical and new to me, I pour over it and look at the evidence given. I consult other works that I trust and ask questions of those whose opinions I have learned to respect. I also look to these sources for objections. When I was told about the Doctrine of Grace, my first thought was, "Of course one is saved by grace as soon as he takes the necessary steps toward grace." Trusted brothers in Christ patiently presented a grace to me that was much more amazing than what I had believed before.

The radical idea that I don't have to jump through any hoops! The belief that God is active at every level of our being, including the important parts! The concept that the atonement was not even a partial failure! These are the kinds of things I wrestled with until this doctrine was presented to me.

I read and learned, but had some nagging questions about it all. And then came a book review by Tim Challies. I immediately decided to purchase this title.

After one quick reading of this book, it all began to really make sense to me.
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44 of 49 people found the following review helpful By Jacob Aitken on May 26, 2004
Format: Paperback
What St. Horton Really Said
Yes, I am basing my title off an N T Wright book (I borrowed the title, I am not critiquing or applauding Wright). I really get annoyed at having to write reviews that are both explanatory of the book and refuting what some anti-Horton apologist wrote. I am speaking particularly of the reader from Portland, OR. I will not spend too much time refuting him, he does a good job of it himself. My aim in this review is to speak of the book, refute the attacking reviewer, and explain how one is to write a review.
Horton attempts several things in this book: 1) present historic, reformed Christianity in a popular fashion, and 2) offer this new-found protestantism as an antidote to the self-help psychology group. Since many in the debate are familiar with the five points of Calvinism, I will forego them, sufficing to say that Horton gives them new (and better) names, killing the acronym. Instead of Total Depravity--Rebels without a Cause; Unconditional Election--Grace before Time; Limited Atonement--Mission Accomplished; Irresistable Grace--Intoxicating Grace; Perseverance of the Saints--No Lost Causes. Fear not, Calvinists, these are the same doctrines always taught, just renamed.
Horton does several challenging things with this gospel: 1) after affirming that God is Soveriegn, he then critiques Dispensationalism and charges it with affirming that God has lost control over creation. His second to last chapter is on keys to spiritual growth (think: sacraments). I have to disagree with him on baptism, although it is a well-defended chapter. I disagree with Horton on two points: Baptism and his representation of postmillennialism.
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