Buy Used
$0.01
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by -usedbooks123-
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Very Good used copy: Some light wear to cover, spine and page edges. Very minimal writing or notations in margins. Text is clean and legible. Possible clean ex-library copy with their stickers and or stamps. We ship daily!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Putting A Roof On Winter: Hockey's Rise from Sport to Spectacle Hardcover – December 31, 2000


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$45.90 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Douglas & McIntyre (December 31, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1550547984
  • ISBN-13: 978-1550547986
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 6.5 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,530,350 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

The author resides in Vancouver, British Columbia.

More About the Author

Michael McKinley is an author, journalist and screenwriter. He was born in Vancouver, and educated at UBC and Oxford University. His crime novel The Penalty Killing was nominated for an Arthur Ellis Award for best first crime novel in 2011. He has written several best-selling books on hockey, as well as award-winning documentaries for CNN, and is currently working on a novel set in the Vatican. Facetime, a crime thriller novella, is his first Amazon Kindle Single. He lives in New York City with his wife and daughter.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 18, 2003
Format: Hardcover
This book is fascinating on a number of levels. It gives a great account of the beginnings of hockey, including the tensions between anglo and francophone players in Montreal in the early days.
It's also a great trip down memory lane for any fan who remembers a few decades back to players like the Rocket, and has even further, but fuzzy, memories of guys like Turk Broda or Howie Morenz. McKinley covers all the major players and moments of hockey past.
But the book is more than that. It's at many levels an argument about the game, and the recurring message is that, from the very start, there's been tension between owners who have tried to outspend each other in order to win.
Reading about this element puts the currently approaching labor crisis in a historical perspective in a way that no other hockey book I'm familiar with does. For that reason alone, it's worth the read.
It makes me wish that Gary Bettman, every NHL owner, and every player would pick up a copy. It might enlighten them to know that the money and contract issues currently plaguing the game are not new. Fans can only hope that it would have the further effect of waking them up to the effects of excess before they give the game a black eye through another work stoppage.
A fantastic book. McKinley is to be congratulated.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 26, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Fantastic Stories about the history of hockey and the Stanley Cup. Not written like a usual history book, but written as a wonderful story! To anyone who plays hockey or is a big fan, this book is a must!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Corey Mull on January 21, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
There aren't a ton of all-encompassing books of hockey history - unlike, say, the hundreds available about baseball. So when I find out about one, I typically buy it.

This book is pretty good, especially for an American - I suppose I didn't really understand all the nuances of Canada's relationship to the game, and particularly French Canada's relationship to the Montreal Canadiens. But, as another reviewer mentioned, minor issues dog the book throughout. It's in serious, serious need of copy editing - for instance, the author spells a Maple Leaf vice-president's last name two different ways in the same paragraph, and, a few pages before that, writes that Player A replaced the irreplaceable Player B. I mean, I get what you're going for there, but use a different word than "irreplaceable".

I can't speak to the factual errors, not knowing a lot of details about the history of the game. But this book needs a serious clean-up.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Originally written for the paperback version of the book:

A well written book that has extensive details on the early formation of hockey. Includes details that are hard to find in any other book. Great for learning about the pre-NHL history of the game, as well as some of the lesser known, and shadier, aspects of the Original Six era. Also offers a short description of the Summit Series, possibly one of the most defining tournaments in sports history.

The only problems I had with the book were few and far between. A lack of a bibliography stands out, which would have been nice for someone hoping to look further into the subject at hand. I also saw, in one chapter at least (about Cyclone Taylor), what looked like a clear case of plagiarism, with a whole paragraph lifted out of another book written about Taylor (Cyclone Taylor: A Hockey Legend, by Eric Whitehead). There were also several factual errors, with the author giving the wrong years for players winning awards in nearly every occasion. One that stood out for me was stating that Syl Apps was the first winner of the Calder Trophy for rookie of the year in 1937 when Carl Voss was the inaugural winner in 1933. This happened several times, and by the end I was becoming concerned that if the author couldn't get these simple dates correct, what other parts of the book are wrong, specifically parts that aren't so easy to find a source for.

Regardless, the book is excellent for anyone looking to learn how hockey rose from nothing to become the sport that it is today.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again