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Pygmalion Kindle Edition

4.4 out of 5 stars 68 customer reviews

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Length: 146 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product Details

  • File Size: 252 KB
  • Print Length: 146 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publication Date: May 11, 2012
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0082QHHGO
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,196 Free in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Free in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
Books like this one are hard to review because I feel like I can’t do them justice. Simply saying, “Book great. You must read” just don’t cut it. This is one of my favorite books, ok technically it’s a play, but I read it in book form, so I always think of it as a book. It’s definitely my favorite George Bernard Shaw play. It was also turned into one of my favorite musicals “My Fair Lady”. A bitter speech therapist, Henry Higgins, meats ups with Liza Doolittle, a "guttersnipe," which is like a bum or street person or gypsy. He bets his friend that he can make her ”talk good” and insert her into upper society and no one would realize she was a poor lower class person. In those days, as is now to a certain degree, your speech patterns and accents said a lot about you and who you were and where you fit into society. We see it in the States to a certain extent, but back then in England, class was everything. Of course, they kind of both fall for each other in the process, but both handle it very differently and not very well. It’s like a love hate relationship. They love each other, but come from such different worlds, plus Higgins has kind of sworn of women. Pygmalion was a Greek sculptor who fell in love with a statue he had carved, so you can see why Shaw called his book this. It also reminds me of Great Gatsby because it’s a good example of that society and how they thought.
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This is definitely a classic that should be read and appreciated. If you love the movie "My Fair Lady" this is the book the story was based on. I really enjoyed this book.
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The book is definitely better in regards to getting a deep perspective of the main characters. I still love the musical but the book allows a window into the personalities of people which we encounter everyday.
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Stories based on Shaw's Pygmalion are numerous and for good reason. This play's messages about the class distinction in turn of the century England and the struggles of the lower and middle class when faced with the lumbering and obstinate influences of an obsolete nobility reflect through any time period, explaining perfectly well why there seems to be an adaptation every ten years or so (My Fair Lady, Pretty Woman, She's All That, and Selfie to name a few).

The story of Eliza and Higgins is not one of love, except the kind of love one feels for their fellows. They are not meant to end up together as Shaw states in the closing essay included in the book. This serves to further show the distinction between the classes and the camaraderie of Higgins and Eliza.
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‘Pygmalion’ is a very entertaining and thoughtful play that ends abruptly. Thoughts, feelings and backgrounds in a play cannot easily be included in the dialog between individuals. Bernard Shaw does a better job of this in some of his other works. In ‘Pygmalion’ backgrounds are mostly included in the epilog. It is helpful to have first seen the Lerner/Lowe musical, ‘My Fair Lady’ (highly recommended) that fills in much of the background and feelings with music and additional dialog. Otherwise, I would suggest that the reader first read the first few pages of the Epilog (Act V) to Pygmalion before reading the play. All Bernard Shaw plays have many quotable quotes, and I thoroughly enjoy this work.
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If I had not already known this story/play, I might have been disappointed, but the notes at the end made me laugh out loud to consider what was NOT told in the play that I saw. The concluding notes were pretty funny considering how inept everyone seemed to be at doing whatever they needed to do to make a living--much less a success--of their businesses. It is pretty amusing to think of someone resenting being placed in the middle class and then suffering for it by having relatives need one's help. This story has not lost its meaningfulness even in this age.
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This is an amazing look at the transformation of a person blurs the lines between who she was and what she becomes. There is no going back to being a rough, uneducated flower seller for Lizza. Shaw's work demonstrates that sometimes the "creation" far out shines the creator. Still a wonderful play.....and and an excellent study of men's and women's relationships
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Format: Kindle Edition
My favourite character has got to be Alfred Doolittle (Eliza's father), a member of the undeserving poor, who isn't qualified to seek charitable benefits and subsequently justifies his "hustler" means of gaining money as a means of surviving an unfair society.

He's content (to an extent) with his lot in life - as it means he isn't inflicted with the chains that bind the Middle-class (possessions and people are burdensome you see). Hence middle class morality doesn't extend to his lifestyle (when we first meet him that is).

A few quotes of Mr Doolittle:

DOOLITTLE [to Pickering] I thank you, Governor. [To Higgins, who takes refuge on the piano bench, a little overwhelmed by the proximity of his visitor; for Doolittle has a professional flavor of dust about him]. Well, the truth is, I've taken a sort of fancy to you, Governor; and if you want the girl, I'm not so set on having her back home again but what I might be open to an arrangement. Regarded in the light of a young woman, she's a fine handsome girl. As a daughter she's not worth her keep; and so I tell you straight. All I ask is my rights as a father; and you're the last man alive to expect me to let her go for nothing; for I can see you're one of the straight sort, Governor. Well, what's a five pound note to you? And what's Eliza to me? [He returns to his chair and sits down judicially].

DOOLITTLE. Don't say that, Governor. Don't look at it that way. What am I, Governors both? I ask you, what am I? I'm one of the undeserving poor: that's what I am. Think of what that means to a man. It means that he's up agen middle class morality all the time. If there's anything going, and I put in for a bit of it, it's always the same story: "You're undeserving; so you can't have it.
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