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Quackenstein Hatches a Family Hardcover


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Quackenstein Hatches a Family + Hampire! + Pirate Princess
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  • Pirate Princess $14.23

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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 3
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Harry N. Abrams (October 1, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0810989735
  • ISBN-13: 978-0810989733
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 8.9 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #127,837 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

K-Gr 2–Quack the duck is grumpy. All the other animals in the zoo have someone to love and snuggle with, but Quack is alone. It doesn't seem to occur to him that the signs on his shack, “KEEP OUT ALL!! JUST LEAVE ME BE!” might account in part for his solitary status. One day he comes upon a basket of eggs with a sign that reads,“ORPHANED EGGS/HOMES NEEDED” and he decides to adopt one. He eagerly awaits its hatching, but when it does, he is horrified. What emerges is not the fuzzy duckling he had hoped for, but a red-eyed, sharp-clawed “monster.” Quack runs away in terror, the “monster” in hot pursuit. Eventually it corners Quack in a cave and he fears the worst. When the monster says, “Hello, Dad,” Quack's heart melts, and he and his son–a platypus–walk off, wing in paw. The idea that prospective adoptive parents would not only abandon, but would also be horrified when the child is not what they expect, or has a birth defect, creates a potentially hurtful scenario. The acrylic illustrations with touches of Photoshop feature murky blues and purples and are not likely to have a great deal of child appeal. Keiko Kaza's A Mother for Choco (Putnam, 1992) is an excellent antidote for the message this book sends.Grace Oliff, Ann Blanche Smith School, Hillsdale, NJ
© Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

About the Author

Sudipta Bardhan-Quallen visits schools to share her stories, and teaches writing. She lives in New Jersey with her three children. Visit her online at www.sudipta.com.

 

Brian T. Jones is a graduate of the Otis College of Art and Design whose work has appeared in the New Yorker. He lives in Pasadena, California. Visit him online at www.briantjones.com.


More About the Author

Sudipta Bardhan-Quallen never thought she'd grow up to be a writer. As a child, she thought of being a doctor (but she's afraid of blood), a lawyer (but she doesn't like losing arguments), a carpenter (but she's too clumsy), a model (but she likes eating too much), a presidential candidate (but she had a dissolute youth), a UN ambassador (the argument losing thing again)... almost everything but a writer.

In fact, in 2001, Sudipta was well on her way to not being a writer. She had graduated from the California Institute of Technology in 1998 with a BS in Biology, spent a year in Boston, and then had returned to Caltech as a PhD candidate in developmental biology. That's when she had her first child, Isabella. Bella's birth didn't change Sudipta's plans - she thought she'd take a long maternity leave then return to graduate school. Then, her daughter Brooklyn came along.

With two small children, Sudipta found herself less interested in biology as she was in parenting. And for the first time, she found that she had stories to tell, stories she wanted to share with her daughters, and she decided to try to get published. After a half-dozen rejections, in 2003, Sudipta sold her first story to a children's magazine, Highlights for Children.

Using her science background as a springboard, Sudipta began writing nonfiction for children, including Championship Science Fair Projects, Last Minute Science Fair Projects, AIDS, and Autism. She branched out into other nonfiction, including biographies of Franklin Delano Roosevelt and Jane Goodall, and altogether, Sudipta has written 18 nonfiction books for kids.

Her first love, however, was always picture books, so using a facility with word play and a love for animals (especially pigs), Sudipta worked on a number of manuscripts. Most of them were rejected (she freely admits, when she started writing picture books, they really stank!).

Sudipta kept at it, and fittingly, her first picture book, Tightrope Poppy, the High-Wire Pig, illustrated by Sarah Dillard, about a proud pig who perseveres was published in 2006. This was followed in 2007 by The Mine-o-saur, illustrated by David Clark, in 2008 by Ballots for Belva: The True Story of a Woman's Race for the Presidency, illustrated by Courtney Martin, and in 2009 by The Hog Prince, illustrated by Jason Wolff. Sudipta has nine other picture books scheduled for the next few years, including Pirate Princess, illustrated by Jill McElmurry, Half Pint Pete the Pirate, illustrated by Geraldo Valeria, and The Hampire, illustrated by Howard Fine. Her children, now including a son named Sawyer who was born in 2006, are a constant source of inspiration. Sudipta has heard the words "Mine! Mine! Mine!" shouted so many times that The Mine-o-saur almost flowed out of her mind naturally. Watching her daughters devour donuts inspired The Hampire, dress up playdates inspired Pirate Princess, and she refuses to admit what (or whose snoring) inspired Snoring Beauty.

As for The Hog Prince, well, any girl--including Sudipta--will tell you that you have to kiss a lot of hogs before you find what you want in life.

Sudipta visits schools to share her stories and experience, and teaches writing to children and adults. She lives in New Jersey with her family and an imaginary pony named Penny.


Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By AV on September 24, 2010
Format: Hardcover
This book is GREAT!! Such a fun read, the rhyming story flows well and is interesting for kids and adults. What really makes this such a great book though are the illustrations..they are so clever, bright and colorful. Excellent job Mr. Jones in bringing a fun story to life with your paintings!
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Meredith Raith on September 22, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Quackenstein is adorable. The pictures are beautiful, the story is uplifting and kids love it.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Happy Grandmother on September 19, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Cute story, great illustrations. Perfect for the 3-5 year old set - and adults who read to them.
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By Amber Lopez on December 17, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Really fun book ... And this author's book 'Hampire' is even better. The term 'Hampire' has become part of our families vernacular (used whenever someone is getting hungry-grumpy). We all wish we could find more books by this inventive author.
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