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Quantico Hardcover – April 16, 2007


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Vanguard Press (April 16, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1593154453
  • ISBN-13: 978-1593154455
  • Product Dimensions: 9.6 x 6.4 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,438,291 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

This thought-provoking near-future thriller from bestseller Bear (Dead Lines) focuses on two young FBI agents: William Griffin, the son of a legendary FBI lawman, struggles through training; Fouad Al-Husam, who expects suspicion for his heritage and Muslim faith, finds himself instead sent on super-secret missions to the Middle East. Playing a minor supporting role is their Quantico classmate, Jane Rowland. When a quiet man with mismatched eyes starts telling certain fanatics that he can make gene-keyed anthrax to destroy their hereditary enemies, Griffin and Al-Husam form an unlikely team, headed by veteran agent Rebecca Rose, to handle the threat. Bear's near-future science is, as always, eerily plausible, and while he doesn't stint on sharp criticism of political infighting and its potential to hinder antiterrorism efforts, his would-be terrorists become surprisingly sympathetic as the complex details of their true plan are slowly (sometimes too slowly) revealed. (Mar.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Veteran science-fiction author Bear proves here that he is as comfortable in the near future as he is centuries or millennia down the road. Just a handful of years from today, global terrorism has escalated out of control. In Jerusalem, a sacred religious site is destroyed. Another attack on U.S. soil has taken the lives of thousands. New killing technologies are being developed in secret labs around the world. America is losing the war on terror. Enter three young FBI agents, raw recruits whose hunt for an American terrorist could either save the world or destroy it. This chillingly plausible story displays Bear's storytelling gifts to their fullest: his ability to extrapolate from current technologies and political trends; his knack for creating flesh-and-bone characters; his capacity for keeping us on the edges of our seats. His legion of fans will be lining up for this one, and the novel's cross-genre appeal should guarantee it an even wider readership than usual. David Pitt
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

More About the Author

Greg Bear is the author of more than thirty books, spanning thrillers, science fiction, and fantasy, including Blood Music, Eon, The Forge of God, Darwin's Radio, City at the End of Time, and Hull Zero Three. His books have won numerous international prizes, have been translated into more than twenty-two languages, and have sold millions of copies worldwide. Over the last twenty-eight years, he has also served as a consultant for NASA, the U.S. Army, the State Department, the International Food Protection Association, and Homeland Security on matters ranging from privatizing space to food safety, the frontiers of microbiology and genetics, and biological security.

Customer Reviews

For a short book it was slow moving and the ending was boring and anti-climactic.
A. Wilson
When I really like a book I don't like to give too much away because I would rather have someone read the book themselves then to tell too much about the book.
George
Excellant mix of science fiction with thriller by Greg Bear in a very entertaining read.
Bryan J. True

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Rabid Reader on May 4, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Thrillers are one of my staple diet of mind candy & I grew up reading the hard core, science-oriented SF of the 1960's/70's. Mr. Bear has here combined the two with a fast-paced SF police procedural that I picked up on a Friday night and literally did not set down until I had finished it.

Bear's writing is unmuddied, and his plot is clipped to the exact pace of law enforcement officers under the gun (of time). His characters are amazingly well-fleshed for such a novel.
In a political thriller, it is often difficult to let the reader know which characters are trustworthy, which not, and which are conflicted without stirring so many red herrings into the mix that the reader is unable to enjoy the unfolding of the tale. There is no such problem here.
I also give him credit for his several allusions to the SF masters (for whom such times as ours would undoubtedly have produced many novels like this)and for maintaining the correct balance between too much and not enough science background. He makes the probability of bioterrorism seem too real and too possible and too terrifying to ignore--which is just what a near-future thriller ought to do. A very good job overall.
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30 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Louise Marley on May 6, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Bear combines a Crichton-style thriller with some damned good science to scare the pants off readers with this near-future story of bioterror, global politics, and heroic FBI agents. QUANTICO would make--and probably will make--a great movie, with a pace that rockets to the finish, and characters who should pop off the screen. One of Greg Bear's particular talents is to tell a hard science story with characters who live and breathe, and QUANTICO is no exception to the rest of his powerful bibliography. It's not for the faint of heart! But it's a most rewarding read.
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40 of 55 people found the following review helpful By David Arndt on June 4, 2007
Format: Hardcover
To the author's credit, he knows his stuff. This is definitely targeted at people who want intelligent ideas in their novels. I think the writing is pretty good, too, but I have two complaints.

1) The quote on the top of the dust jacket loudly proclaims "an adrenaline-amped thriller that will scare the hell out of you." I would disagree with this. It may have picked up momentum at the end, but the start of the book was definitely plodding. It was interesting, but it hardly "scared the hell out of me."

2) The book is positively dismal in tone. There is no lightness, no optimism. You have to alternate dark and light moods or the book becomes too heavy too enjoy. Maybe that was what the author intended, but if so, it was too depressing for me.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By R. Thomas on October 15, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I like the way Mr. Bear develops characters, how he pulls you into the story and builds to a climax and this is a good example... but he lost me at the end... just too Deus Ex for me to suspend belief. Reality would have been more catastrophic. Adding a political vector or a stronger religious vector to the plot (you don't "Star Wars" Mecca without politics) would have added to the story and perhaps made the ending more believeable.

The science was scarily good (except at the end) and the characters believeable. It's a book I'll add to my library for the concepts.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By PurpleSlog on May 8, 2008
Format: Hardcover
It is a near-future thriller about Bioterror and hints around the edges at the future events in the Mideast, terrorism, the US Intelligence Community and hi-tech National Security gadgets.

It was just okay.

It was really about hi-tech bioterror. Secondary themes were about how the USGOV and the IC isn't doing enough...and is doing too much. And of course, the villain can't be a Muslim.

While some of the gadgetry (Bear is a Science Fiction writer) was interesting (stuff like in this post), most of the characters are cardboard. There is no sense of the importance and scope of 4GW with the importance of messages, information and perceptions.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By clifford on January 4, 2008
Format: Hardcover
I am not a huge greg bear fan. I have been picking up his books for what must be three decades now. However, to the best of my memory, he has always left me feeling like I was unsatisfied with the reading experience. Quantico in my opinion has some stark problems that hold a light to Bears faults as an author. However, at the same time, I can see Bear attempting to deal with these problems, the only thing is that he just barely does not pull it off.

My main beef with Quantico is Bears story telling. He has a great idea, one that he goes back to again and again in different ways, and that is the notion of humanities end. Here he plays with biological warfare, a strain of Anthrax and a new virus that could possibly wipe out all of humanity. For Bear, he has some fairly interesting protagonists. I could feel the extra effort he made to flesh out the characters this time, and for three quarters of the book, I was totally sucked in. However, Bear uses several characters to tell the story and eventually you get lost following one of at least a half dozen story lines. I think he could have done a better job by just sticking to one character.

If you like Bear, you will enjoy this book. Bear is an idea man and this is a good one. In the hands of a more gifted story teller, this would have been dynamite.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By John L. Miller on December 30, 2012
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Greg Bear is an accomplished sci-fi writer who has written previously about genetic engineering, viruses, bacteria, etc. in books like Blood Music, Darwin's Radio, and others.

In the near-future, 'Griff' is just graduating from the FBI academy at Quantico. Terrorist attacks and paranoia have resulted in a proliferation of US government investigative branches, sometimes created solely to investigate other branches. Just because you're paranoid, however, doesn't mean no one is out to get you... Griff's father is a legendary FBI agent, staking out a long-time white supremicist, bomber, and domestic terrorist. Clues he uncovers wind up setting his son's path: what do ink jet printers, yeast, and fireworks have in common? The answer could destroy us all!

While science fiction and bio-engineering play an important role, this is a character-driven investigative thriller. It's a good enough book, but it is a far cry my favorites, such as Queen of Angels and Slant, set in the distant future. Still, it had a satisfying conclusion, and I'm getting the second in the series, Mariposa.

If you like police / FBI thrillers with a taste of Crichton, this is a good choice for you. For me, it was just alright, and hence three stars.
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