Qty:1
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Quantum Mechanics has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This is a used text in good condition. It may have some writing and highlighting. Ships directly from Amazon. Eligible for free super saver shipping.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Trade in your item
Get a $19.25
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Quantum Mechanics Paperback – December 1, 1997

ISBN-13: 978-0471887027 ISBN-10: 0471887021 Edition: 3rd

Buy New
Price: $187.09
28 New from $112.42 26 Used from $44.81 1 Collectible from $82.77
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$187.09
$112.42 $44.81
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Rapid advances in quantum optics, atomic physics, particle physics and other areas have been driven by fantastic progress in instrumentation (especially lasers) and computing technology as well as by the ever-increasing emphasis on symmetry and information concepts--requiring that all physicists receive a thorough grounding in quantum mechanics. This book provides a carefully structured and complete exposition of quantum mechanics and illustrates the common threads linking many different phenomena and subfields of physics.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 672 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 3 edition (December 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0471887021
  • ISBN-13: 978-0471887027
  • Product Dimensions: 7.3 x 1.2 x 10.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #933,248 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Important Information

Ingredients
Example Ingredients

Directions
Example Directions

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

50 of 51 people found the following review helpful By Tobias James Osborne on October 30, 2000
Format: Paperback
Merzbacher is one of the `classic' learning books on quantum mechanics. It is commonly grouped together with Messiah, Schiff and Davydov. Unlike most of the other classics however, Merzbacher has moved with the times and managed to keep up with current trends in quantum mechanics.
When I originally flipped through this book I was impressed by the wealth of the content and the large number of interesting exercises that applied the fundamentals to the basic principles of various fields of research (quantum optics and quantum information for example). I then resolved to work through all of the problems and exercises. After having completed this book I am less impressed than I hoped I would be.
The problems in this book are divided into two classes, the first being exercises interspersed throughout the text, the second being problems at the end of each chapter. None of the exercises in the text are difficult but they tend to disrupt the flow of the book as they (especially towards the end of the book) are of the form: `now you have seen the most trivial case, verify this formula for the cases n=5,6,7 which will involve you inverting 27 4x4 matrices' (I exaggerate slightly). I am a little irritated by this as it requires the reader to switch into autopilot and wade through pages of algebra to get a result you knew you would get anyway. The problems at the end of each chapter range from the ultimately trivial to applications to some research topics (but still fairly straightforward).
The style of the presentation of the subject matter is a little quirky and idiosyncratic in places. This book is in its 3rd edition and it is easy to pick additions in this edition. The typo density increases in these chapters/sections and the text just skims the derivations.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
24 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Physics Prof on November 5, 1999
Format: Hardcover
I cannot let the posted reviews go unanswered. I have taught from the various editions of Merzbacher for many years (since I was a graduate TA for a QM course) and have always had good results with it. It is not, however, an undergraduate text at most institutions. And any student advanced enough to be in a course where Merzbacher is appropriately used knows that graduate physics textbooks are not intended to be problem solving manuals. At this stage of one's development, one knows how to convert the principles learned from lecture and study into appropriate problem solving strategies. My principal complaint is the price; I cannot ask my students to pay $100 for a textbook, even in 1999. More's the pity.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 1, 2000
Format: Paperback
Having had this text recommended for my graduate quantum class, but not taught from (instead taught out of the execrable book by J.J. Sakurai), I think that Merzbacher has written a very readable and very thorough book. Clearly, it is not a book aimed at undergraduates, but it is very elegantly written and uses the approach mirrored in Gasiorowicz and others, building the subject up with ordinary calculus and slowly bringing in matrix algebra. For a more modern treatment, and one very well written for the motivated self-studier, try Shankar's "Principles of Quantum Mechanics".
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 5, 2003
Format: Paperback
I would give it 2.5 stars if I could - I don't think it quite deserves 3.
A wealth of information. If you're looking for it, it's probably at least mentioned in here if it's mentioned in any QM textbook anywhere. Might make a good reference, then.
However, as a book to learn from it seems generally obtuse difficult to read (though some sections are better or worse than others). It isn't just that it's abstract or mathematical - I don't mind that at all; in fact that's one of the strengths of this book in my opinion - but that the necessary explanation just isn't there, or is ineffective.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 1, 1999
Format: Hardcover
I agree with Mr. Jacob; this is a classic for good reasons. A student with an introductory QM course under his/her belt will enjoy the more advanced subjects (2nd quantisation, dirac equation,...). I also agree with Mr. Jacob about the price: this is much too high for the average student, presumably the targeted audience; something like 40 dollars would be more reasonable. Moreover, a book should be judged on its own merits; it is not Merzbacher's fault that some students want a easier book. Giving a 1 star comment because a book is too difficult is inappropriate.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Physics_Student on December 20, 2005
Format: Paperback
In my opinion the critical problem with this book is that it fails to put quantum mechanics in the context of physical science. The entire book reads like a mathematical exercise contrived by a person to test/entertain other people, rather than the documentation of refined mathematical statements of empirical observations. Others have said it is hard to read, this is true. They have said the organisation is not great, this is also true, but the larger issue, once again in my oppinion, is that the book does not relate the mathematical act of DOING quantum mechanics calculations to the the physical world. Although this is a common malady amongts physics textbooks, texts on Quantum Mechanics by J.J. Sakurai and D.J. Griffiths, the former an advanced text, the latter introductory, manage to better put the mathematical theory in proper physical context. Buy it because its required for most graduate level Quantum Mechanics courses, but be prepared to consult other texts in order to develop an understanding of quantum mechanics.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Frequently Bought Together

Quantum Mechanics + Classical Electrodynamics Third Edition
Price for both: $295.34

Buy the selected items together