Queenpin: A Novel and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $13.99
  • Save: $2.17 (16%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Fast Shipping - Safe and Secure Bubble Mailer!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Queenpin: A Novel Paperback – June 5, 2007


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$11.82
$4.99 $0.01
Take%20an%20Extra%2030%25%20Off%20Any%20Book

Special Offers and Product Promotions

  • Take an Extra 30% Off Any Book: Use promo code HOLIDAY30 at checkout to get an extra 30% off any book for a limited time. Excludes Kindle eBooks and Audible Audiobooks. Restrictions apply. Learn more.

  • Get a $150 Amazon.com Gift Card: Get the Citi ThankYou® Preferred Card and earn a $150.00 digital Amazon.com Gift Card* after $1,000 in card purchases within 3 months of account opening. Learn more.

Frequently Bought Together

Queenpin: A Novel + The Song Is You: A Novel
Price for both: $24.44

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 180 pages
  • Publisher: Simon & Schuster; First Edition edition (June 5, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1416534288
  • ISBN-13: 978-1416534280
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.6 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (41 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #536,749 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Edgar-finalist Abbott (Die a Little) delivers a sharp, slender, hardboiled tale of a protégé's schooling by a notorious, been-there-done-that moll. The first time the unnamed 22-year-old female narrator lays eyes on Gloria Denton, her first thought is I want the legs. The setting is the Club Tee Hee, an indeterminate Las Vegas–L.A. nowhere where the kid is doing the mobbed-up books, and Gloria comes in every few weeks to count Jerome's vig. The kid absorbs very entertaining lessons in how to dress, move, behave, and how to pick up, transport and distribute payoffs and winnings—until she falls for sweet-talking gambler Vic Riordan. Abbott is pitch-perfect throughout: Gloria Denton, still turning heads in her 40s, is as hard a moll as any, and the kid is a beautiful combination of foil and tool as she strives to emulate her role model. The collision, violent and inevitable, rips away the facade of glitz and glamour, and leaves their low-end edifice starkly exposed.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Working from her story in the anthology Damn Near Dead (2006), noir's reigning crown princess delivers a royally entertaining rumination on toxic female friendships set in the harsh neon underbelly of early-1960s Las Vegas. The tale of an avaricious assistant to a Virginia Hill-style Mob courier unfolds so cinematically it's difficult not to picture it onscreen--perhaps pitched as The Grifters meets Casino, with Sharon Stone and Scarlett Johansson under the leering direction of Quentin Tarantino. "Gloria's girl," they call her when she's corralling payoffs from casino managers, fixing odds at the track, and doling out pad money to the cops. But she's out for a glorious score, and the taste of a gem heist she sets up only makes her ravenous for more. It's too bad that head for nasty business is paired with a body built for even nastier sin--and a heart foolish enough to go out to Vic Riordan, a self-destructive gambler nearing his final spin of the wheel. It'd be nice to get a better glimpse of her motivations, but this is a sleek, slick, seductive treat. Frank Sennett
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

More About the Author

MEGAN ABBOTT is the Edgar award-winning author of six novels, including Dare Me, The End of Everything and Bury Me Deep. Her writing has appeared in Detroit Noir, Queens Noir, Phoenix Noir, New York Times and Los Angeles Times Magazine. She is the author of The Street Was Mine: White Masculinity in Hardboiled Fiction and Film Noir and editor of A Hell of a Woman, a female crime fiction anthology. She has been nominated for awards including the Steel Dagger, the LA Times Book Prize and the Pushcart Prize. Currently, she is working on the screenplay for her novel, Dare Me, soon to be a major motion picture.

Born in the Detroit area, she graduated from the University of Michigan with a B.A. in English Literature and went on to receive her Ph.D. in English and American literature from New York University. She lives in Queens, New York City.

Customer Reviews

Highly recommend this to all fans of good noir fiction.
Michael J. Smith
No spoilers, but I thought the ending was a logical progression for the character, and nicely set up during the whole book.
NYC Family
Abbott's writing is excellent and quickly pulls you into the story and the world.
Book Nympho

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Gayle on October 2, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Die A Little is still my favorite, but this book is a sleek dark rocket. I could not put it down. When my husband read Die A Little, he said he loved it, and would read anything else Megan Abbott wrote, but that he wished James M. Cain had done a pass over it. He got his wish in this book. Lean and mean, but still displaying Abbott's own poetic voice, Queenpin is a knockout noir, taut and twisted, neon surface glitter hiding subterranean depths.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Sue Ann Jaffarian on March 26, 2008
Format: Paperback
I have never read much noir, but "Queenpin" was recommended to me by Christa Faust, who wrote the wonderful and gritty "Money Shot," which I also loved.

"Queenpin" blew me away. From the opening line, Abbott takes you into the depths of her main character's mind, heart and soul and holds you hostage for the entire book.

I echo the comment made by another reviewer here: I want to read a prequel featuring Gloria Denton!

I'm hooked!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Keith Otis Edwards on December 23, 2012
Format: Paperback
Readers of popular fiction can tell from browsing a few pages whether the novel will be an entertaining read. The author either has or lacks the ability to string words together so that they "sound" right -- just as a musician has the talent to string notes together so that it sounds satisfying. A talented writer has an "ear" for words, especially dialogue, just as the musician has an ear for music, and obviously the actual organs we call ears are not as involved in these activities as is some neighborhood in the brain.

There are a lot of weak imitators of classic 1950s pulp fiction, but Megan Abbott has mastered the style perfectly. Short, declarative sentences. Sentence fragments. Best of all are the clever turns of phrase:
"Cut the theatrics, flannel mouth." (pg.94)
"Too stupid to be scared." (pg.6)

When the Queenpin is presented with the narrator, she asks skeptically, "Who's the lollypop?"

For my personal taste, I enjoy the novels of Megan Abbott, because the situations and characters are plausible -- unlike modern techno-thrillers -- but more than that, Megan Abbott has the "ear."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Paige Ellen on February 22, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've read all three of Ms Abbott's novels now. She is a quick read and will not strain your brain. However, her recollection of the time about which she writes is a delight. She also writes in a manner tough enough to invoke early Spillane and his peers (if he has any). The switch to dangerous females in lead roles is also quite fun. I read a lot of modern mystery writers, i.e. Fairstein, Scottoline, Barr, Henry, Stabenow, Graves, etc and Megan Abbott's perspective is refreshing. Her writing is crisp and moves along very nicely and easily holds the reader's attention. Give her a try; you won't regret it. Just remember, if you are looking for complex plot structure and deep detailed character development, go elsewhere. This is about scheming and action. Delightful to read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Book Nympho on October 17, 2012
Format: Paperback
I picked this book up because I've been wanting to read a noir style novel for some time now. I was also drawn to it because the main characters are female which seems to be rare in this genre.

Abbott's writing is excellent and quickly pulls you into the story and the world. As you read the concise language and wording makes you feel of that era. I found myself hearing the characters in voices similar to 1940s black & white noir films. The way they spoke was perfect without being too exaggerated or phony.

The main character is a young woman who is drawn to this shadowy world and can't resist its allure. She is taken under the wing of Gloria Denton and is a fast learner. But then she meets a man who even she knows is trouble but she's helpless to resist him. Although she's clever, she can't seem to untangle herself and it's like watching a car crash in slow motion because you know it won't end well.

Still the reading experience was amazing and I really enjoyed having a glimpse into that world. Abbott does such a great job of creating the atmosphere and showing all the characters without revealing too much. I can't wait to read more books like this and pretty much anything else Abbott has written.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Elijah on October 18, 2010
Format: Paperback
I am, in large part, a fan of long, sprawling, adventurous types of stories. Maybe it's because that constitutes the bulk of what I read that I'm so impressed by a hardboiled, pulp-type novel done well: because it manages to pack so much into so little space.

Coming in at a mere 180 pages, Queenpin by Megan Abbott is a frightening, violent, atmospheric little book that really won't let you go. You can finish it in an afternoon... and honestly, if you've got the free afternoon I don't see why you'd have it any other way.

The major virtue of Queenpin, in its way, actually reminds me a good deal of Walter Mosley's Devil In a Blue Dress. Each book somewhat co-opts the style of older crime novels, but adds an element that wouldn't really have been explored fairly in most books from the original time period. (Race in Mosley's tale, the role of women in Abbot's.) This serves to give each book a sort of modern spin on things, but not to the point of feeling shoe-horned in. Nothing's worse than when an author's work screams: "Look at my strong female characters! Aren't they great?!"

The female leads in Queenpin aren't one-note femme fatales, but they are as believably tough, crooked, strong, frightening, and weak as any male character. The unnamed lead character/narrator even finds herself prey to the same kind of ruining lust as a male noir lead.

Essentially, that main character finds herself taken under the wing of high-up female criminal who's been around since the 20's, (the book is set roughly in the early 60's) where she gets her requisite taste for the high life, etc. Then, she goes and falls for the wrong man. It really is the classic setup with the genders reversed, and she's never even really that dedicated.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?