Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Queen's Jewels Hardcover – September 1, 1997


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$42.00 $0.73

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Harry N. Abrams (September 1, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0810981726
  • ISBN-13: 978-0810981720
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 8.8 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,338,157 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

The Queen's Jewels captures the opulence and splendor of the gems of English queens from Mary Queen of Scots to Elizabeth II. Organized alphabetically by gemstones, this historical and visual documentary elegantly displays the world's most famous jewelry collection intertwined with accounts of romance, intrigue, and politics. It offers an inside look at the tastes of each monarch, from Queen Mary's Delhi Durbar emeralds to Elizabeth II's diamond engagement ring designed by Prince Philip. The Jewels of the Duchess of Windsor documents the final chapter of this century's best-known love story, that of the Engish king who abdicated to marry American divorcee Wallis Warfield Simpson, and the sale of the historic collection of jewels he gave her. Rayner, however, curiously focuses on a biography of the Duke and the events leading to the fabled marriage. Beautifully illustrated, the catalog portion meticulously describes and displays each of the 214 pieces, ranging from memorabilia of the Duke to the exquisite jewels designed mostly by Cartier and Van Cleef and Arpels. Includes a list of prices from the sale of the collection in 1987. Carefully researched and designed, both books are recommended. Stephen Allan Patrick, East Tennessee State Univ. Lib., Johnson City
Copyright 1987 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
5 star
26
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 28 customer reviews
Take time to view this book or buy it and enjoy.
Sandra M. Lias
Leslie Field's "The Queen's Jewels: The Personal Collection of Elizabeth II" is a splendid, splendid book in every way.
Catherine S. Vodrey
I have found a few errors which surprised me because I have a latter edition of the book.
Antonia G. Melamed

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Catherine S. Vodrey on September 1, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Leslie Field's "The Queen's Jewels: The Personal Collection of Elizabeth II" is a splendid, splendid book in every way. Field has gathered together hundreds of important photographs (of the nearly half million she saw altogether) of Queen Elizabeth's jewels. These are shown both in their cases and being worn by various monarchs, and we see how different royal family members have altered the look or the purpose of pieces as fashions and times changed over the years. Field has complemented these photographs with her outstanding, meticulously researched text. Even if you purchase the book mostly to drool over the photographs, you will end up being both captivated and educated by the accompanying text.
Field begins the book with the ascension of Queen Victoria to the throne. Because of the Salic laws passed by the House of Hanover in 1833, Victoria was prevented from becoming ruler of both the United Kingdom and Hanover. The kingdoms were split for the first time in well over a century. Immediately, King Ernest of Hanover--an uncle of Queen Victoria--demanded his share of the royal jewels, arguing that since the kingdom had been split, so must be the gems. Victoria disagreed, and the argument went on for two decades before finally being settled in favor of Hanover. Subsequently, Victoria gave up several important pieces of jewelry to her uncle's descendants--but was already well on her way to amassing an important collection.
Victoria was the first British monarch to make clear that some pieces belonged to the Crown and were for use by any Queen to follow her--and that some pieces were her personal property, and hers to dispose of as she saw fit.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Beverley Strong on June 28, 2005
Format: Hardcover
After reading this book and salivating at the photographs, I'll NEVER lust after anyone else's jewellery again. Apart from the sheer magnificence of the stones and the settings, the provenance of the pieces and just how they happened to be in the possession of the various members of the royal family, is completely fascinating. It's also a very interesting look at the social mores of the various eras. In Queen Victoria's time, she tended to wear more modest jewellery, much of which had a sentimental value to her, and so the ladies of the day tended to follow her example. In the following reign, that of Edward V11, the upper classes of the day followed the example of Queen Alexandra, who was a beauty and who dressed lavishly in her own particular style, which was followed by ladies of the court and which featured high necklines, decorated heavily with diamonds and precious stones. In the following reign of a very rigid George V and Queen Mary, the court seemed to be bolstering the idea of an unapproachable royalty, above the touch of scandal and to foster this idea by literally covering the Queen in jewels from head to toe. Today's monarch jewels up only on the most formal of occasions, but it's thanks to her and to the Queens of the past that this amazing collection has been built up over the years to amaze and bedazzle lovers of beautiful jewellery everywhere.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 9, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Field has produced an excellent balance of text and pictures and has done an exceptionally thorough job of documentation. I was fascinated by his descriptions of how the jewelry was modified over the years to accommodate the fashions of the day and the taste of the current owner. The only reason I did not give this 5 stars was due to the pictures. Most are black and white (for obvious reasons), however some were of very poor quality, and very few taken with the intention of displaying jewelry. There was one delightful story of a gift to the young Princess Elizabeth, a necklace and bracelet, which the Queen now refers to as "my best diamonds". But do we get to see the diamonds? No, the only available picture was a distant news photo of the young Princess sitting at an angle and the jewels nearly impossible to see. For Princess Diana fans, don't bother buying this book. There are less than a half dozen images of Diana, and nothing you haven't seen before. And just a reminder, this is her personal collection. You won't see any of the crown regalia.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Craig DiStaso on March 19, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I was so impressed with and have gotten so much Joy from this book, it has inspired me enough to go ahead and try my first on-line review. When I noticed this was out of print I was very surprised. Even more so when I realized there was also a 1997-revised edition. I am hopeful its simply because the newly expanded volume is getting its finishing touches. With digital imaging technology having come so far since the publishing of the first two editions (87/97), the detail that is now available will hopefully be prominently featured in the next. A unique aspect of this book is the thoroughness of information presented on several different topics.
The title subject is definitely covered in meticulous detail. Aside from the jewels it really is almost a complete mini-biography of most of the British Royal Family. After all the Men bought jewels too! It is amazing to see an 18th century piece on Queen Elizabeth and be able to trace it exactly from it origin through the centuries.
The information in text and pictures give a much better understanding of the whole concept of continuity, with many surprises along the way. Tidbits like how Queen Victoria stubbornly refused to return gems that another Royal House insisted it owned. How important Jewels were to Queen Mary, not for their monetary value but because of their family historical importance. Its the little details like this that give you a much more personal understanding of monarchs, without being dishy or gossipy.
Both the front and back inside covers gives a complete family tree dating back to Henry VII. Inside, thirteen categories/chapters cover everything from Diamonds and Emeralds to Sapphires and Amethysts, explaining who favored a particular kind of gem or style over another.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?